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Convict Ship Surgeons - H

 

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B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

 

 

 

*Date of Seniority Royal Navy

 

 

HALL, James
 

(Two surgeons by the name of James Hall...... (1) *2 August 1808;   (2) James Hall *28 August 1809

From the  Australian Dictionary of Biography Online  -  James Hall, naval surgeon, was born on 17 September 1784 at New Inn Yard, Shoreditch, London, son of Joseph Hall and his wife, Mary Shaw. James was a second surgeon at the naval hospital at Corfu, Greece, in 1807. At the risk of his life he warned a British sloop that the French had occupied Corfu, thus saving her from seizure, and gave the commander of H.M.S. Weazle information which enabled him to sink three privateers and capture a gunboat with eight transports under convoy, loaded with French troops bound for Corfu. He was appointed an assistant surgeon in the navy in August 1809 and surgeon in September 1817.

In 1820 James Hall was surgeon-superintendent of the convict transport Agamemnon which reached Sydney in September 1820. (He signed the Journal of the Agamemnon J. Hall, Surgeon, formerly of the Imperial Russian Navy.)

Charles Bateson in The Convict Ships describes James Hall as a zealous, meddlesome and litigious individual who was later surgeon on the Brothers in 1824 and the Mary Anne in 1822 and the Georgiana to Tasmania in 1833...( These Journals are all signed James Hall {2}, Surgeon )

James Hall M.D. (28 August 1809) was on the List of Retired Surgeons of the Royal Navy in 1841.

 

 
HALLION, John William *1 November 1810

 

John William Hallion was born c. 1790 in Edinburgh, Scotland.

He was on the list of surviving men entitled to Naval General Service Medal clasps for actions between 1793 and 1827. He served as Assistant-Surgeon on the Alfred. (84)

He was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814 and was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Alexander. The Alexander departed Ireland 4 November 1815 and arrived in Port Jackson 4th April 1816.  On arrival John Hallion wrote a letter of recommendation and request that ten of the women of the Alexander be exempt from being sent to Van Diemen's Land.

John Hallion married Margaret Catherine Liephardt on 22 December 1817 at St. Marys, Lambeth (103)

He was employed on the convict ship Isabella in 1818. The Isabella departed Portsmouth 3 April 1818 and arrived in Port Jackson 14 September 1818. The voyage was not an easy one. Only 11 days out from port a private ordered into handcuffs for insolent and contemptuous behaviour, committed suicide by jumping overboard (Charles Bateson, The Convict Ships); and on the 18th April John Hallion became aware of a 'serious and alarming conspiracy' to take the ship. Depositions were taken but there seems to have been no further action taken.  He did not intend to remain long in the colony after arrival and was planning to depart for England on the Isabella in October.

Following are some of the children of Margaret Catherine and John William Hallion -  John William, baptised 20 October 1818;  Matilda was baptised in 1820;  daughter Catherine baptised in 1821; George Alexander baptised in 1823; Isabella in 1826; Louisa Ursbet in 1829; Fanny baptised in 1831; Matilda baptised in 1831; Thomas Charles in 1833; Henry Brook in 1836; Julia in 1837

John W. Hallion was on the List of Surgeons unfit for service in 1841 and on the list of Surgeons retired in 1851.

John Hallion age 70, can be found in the 1861 Census residing at Marylebone with his wife Margaret (who was born in Hamburg) and four of their adult children, all unmarried....Catherine age 38 is a Governess; Louisa age 30; Charles age 27, a copying clerk and Julia age 23.

He was on the Medical Register List of 1865. Residence: 29 Charrington St. St. Pancras, London. Qualifications Surgeon in the Navy 1810.

He died in Charrington Street, Oakley square, St. Pancras, Co. Middlesex aged 77 on 13th April 1868. His Will was proved by the oath of Mary Catherine Hallion of the Vicarage Sutton Valence near Staplehurst, Co. Kent, spinster, his daughter. (45)

 

 

HAMETT, Sir John
 

John Hamett (Hammett) was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 20 August 1812. He was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was appointed to the Coromandel in 1818 (Edinburgh Magazine)

He was appointed assistant surgeon to the Leander in 1819

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Gilbert Henderson which arrived in Hobart in 1840. Twenty years later the voyage of the Gilbert Henderson was written of by a young midshipman who was a passenger :-

'In the year 1841, I sailed from Woolwich on board the barque Gilbert Henderson, of Liverpool, chartered as a convict ship by Government, and bound to Hobart Town, Van Diemen's land, with a living freight of three hundred and fifty female convicts.....Besides the naval surgeon (in our case one Sir John Hammet), the passengers on board the Gilbert Henderson comprised a retired 'naval physician of the fleet', who was going out to settle in Van Diemen's Land, on a grant of land he had received from Government; his nephew, a young Irishman about twenty years of age, of no profession, who was going out to seek his fortune, under his uncle's patronage; his son, a lad of fifteen years; a retired army captain, greatly addicted to microscopic studies, who was also going out to take possession of a Government grant; and a midshipman of the Royal Navy (myself) going out to rejoin my ship, after having been on sick furlough.

Sir John Hamett was a surgeon of higher naval rank than it was or is usual to appoint to do duty on board a convict ship. He had been knighted for his services (in Prussia) on behalf of the English Government, during the period of the cholera epidemic of 1831-32. But he had accepted the appointment because it afforded him an opportunity to reach Van Diemen's land free of expense, in order to settle upon a grant of land in the interior of the island, which had been accorded to him for his medical services, in addition to the honour of knighthood.

I may, however, here state that the worthy knight who was somewhat of an eccentric, and was the most enthusiastic of the party respecting the anticipated delights of a colonial life, very soon found his way back to England.

He had provided himself with all the requisites of a settler in the 'bush', such as tents, axes, spades, garden seeds, cooking utensils, etc., and to these had added all the comforts and elegancies of civilisation that he could stow on board, such as articles of furniture, cases of books, pipes and barrels of wine and beer, etc, and, according to his own account, was going to found a Utopia in the wilderness; yet on landing at Portsmouth two years afterwards, the first person I met on the quay was Sir John Hammett!

"I heard that the B had just arrived", he said, as he shook hands with me, "and I came down expecting to find that you had returned to England with the vessel. I thought I'd like to shake hands with my old shipmate again. We had some pleasant days on board the Gilbert  Henderson."

"Yes Sir John", I replied, "But you of all persons are the last I should have expected to meet. I thought you were long ago comfortably settled in the bush."

"Wouldn't do my dear sir", replied the knight. "Not at all the thing for a man of my years. I was sadly disappointed. Not a living soul within twenty miles of my grant. Went to look for it couldn't find it for a long time. Found it. A wretched place. Nobody to speak to but the convict servants I took with me. Should have been dead and buried in less than six months if I'd stayed. Remained a week. Came back to Hobart Town, and sailed for England on board the first vessel that was ready for sea. Sad take in. Grants of land indeed! Cost me hundreds of pounds all thrown away. Ruinous! Come and dine with me today but don't speak of Van Diemen's Land. It makes me miserable to think of it."

I accepted the invitation to dinner and found Sir John very comfortably situated in a modest establishment near Portsmouth, with his wife and daughter, enjoying a much nearer approach to the Utopia of his sanguine imagination than ever he would have succeeded in founding in Tasmania.'

Sir John Hammett was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841 and was appointed to the Vindictive in 1842 (124)

 

 

HAMILTON, James *29 January 1811
 

James Hamilton was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers of 1814

Surgeon Superintendent James Hamilton kept a Medical Journal from 10 March to 12 September 1821 on the voyage of the Adamant

He was also employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Chapman in 1824 and kept a journal from 4th March to 31st July 1824.

James Hamilton was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who were fit for service in 1841

He is on the List of the Medical Registry of 1865 - Residence Newtown Stewart, Co. Tyrone. Qualifications - Surgeon in the Navy 1811, Poor Law appointment 1852.

 

 
HAMILTON, John Macauley
 

John Macauley Hamilton was appointed assistant surgeon on 13 September 1826.

He was appointed assistant surgeon on the Buffalo on 21st January 1833

Pigot's Directory 1837, Stromness, Orkney....

 

In the 1851 Census John Hamilton resided at Stromness, Orkney with his wife Marion age 42. Others in the house hold included Marion age 18, Gavin age 15, John age 13, Helen Hamilton age 11, Margaret age 9, Katharine age 7, Thomas age 4, Colin age 3 and Jessie age 1.

From the British Medical Directory 1854......

 

John Macauley Hamilton's wife Marion was a sister of John Rae. They moved to Canada in the 1850's (1)

 

 

 
HAMILTON, William *10 February 1797
 

William Hamilton was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Elizabeth in 1818. He returned to England in April 1819 on the Shipley with seven other naval surgeons(2)

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Maria to Van Diemen's Land in 1820

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Norfolk in 1825

 

 

 
HAMPTON, John Stephen
 

John Hampton was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Mexborough in 1842. The Mexborough departed Dublin 12 August 1841 and arrived in Van Diemen's Land on 26 December 1841 with 143 female prisoners.  John Hampton kept a Medical Journal from 28th July 1841 and 4th January 1842.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Constant in 1843. He kept a Medical Journal during the voyage from 12 April to 18 September 1843

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Sir George Seymour which departed Woolwich on 9 November 1844. He kept a Medical Journal from 23rd September 1844  to 26 April 1845..........On the 9th October a guard consisting of 2 officers and 30 rank and file accompanied by the usual proportion of women and children embarked on board the Sir George Seymour at Deptford. Next day the ship dropped down to Woolwich where damp cold weather produced several cases of catarrh among the soldiers, one of whom was sent to the military hospital. During the night of the 27th October a soldier's wife was delivered of a fine male child, who afterwards died on board from an attack of infantile fever brought on by neglect and ill treatment. On the morning of the 28th and 29th October 345 Exiles and Convicts were sent on board direct from Pentonville Prison where they had been shut up in separate confinement for periods varying from fifteen to twenty two months. The sudden change from extreme seclusion to the  noise and bustle of a crowded ship produced a great number of cases of convulsions attended in some instances with nausea and vomiting in others simulating hysteria and in all being of a most anomalous character.

He was appointed Comptroller General of Convicts for Van Diemen's Land in 1846 (The Standard 27 May 1846) and Governor of Western Australia in 1862. He died in 1869 at Hastings, East Sussex.

Australian Dictionary of Biography

Australian Medical Pioneer Index

 

 

 

HARRIS, John
 

 

 

HARTLEY, David
 

David Hartley was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the Warrior on the voyage from Calcutta to Port Jackson in 1835

 

 

HASLAM, John *17 August 1815

 

John Haslam was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Mariner in 1816

John Haslam died in 1824........On the 8th instant, at Harwich, aged 31, Mr. John Haslam, surgeon of his Majesty brig Investigator, son of Dr. Haslam of Hart Street, Bloomsbury. (The Examiner 23 May 1824)

 

 
HENDERSON,  Alexander

 

 

 

 

 

HENDERSON, Andrew

 

Andrew Henderson was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 21 May 1811.

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships

Florentia to NSW in 1830

Lord William Bentinck to Van Diemen's Land in 1832. He kept a medical journal from 3 April to 3 September 1832

Royal Admiral  to NSW in 1833

Aurora 1835 to Van Diemen's Land

St. Vincent to NSW in 1837

Royal Sovereign in 1838 to Van Diemen's Land

 

 

 

 

 
HENDERSON, William
 

 (Two surgeons by the name of William Henderson....(1) William Henderson *22 March 1797 (2) *29 October 1808)

Charles Bateson in 'The Convict Ships' records William Henderson as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Bussorah Merchant in 1830, however the signature on the Surgeon's Journal of the Bussorah Merchant seems to be the same as the signature on the Surgeon's Journal of the City of Edinburgh in 1828. Surgeon on the City of Edinburgh was William Anderson.

 

  

HILDITCH, Sir Edward
 

Edward Hilditch was born at St. Andrews Holborn, Middlesex on 13 May 1805, the son of John Frederick and Sarah Hilditch. His brother George William was born 12 October 1803. Both were baptised on the same day in June 1805 . His wife Jane was born at Lambeth Surrey. 

He studied medicine at St. George Hospital, took his diploma in 1826 and entered the naval medical service. He was on the West Indian station and had extensive experience in dealing with outbreaks of yellow fever. (57)

 

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Susan to Van Diemen's Land in 1837 and the Theresa in 1839

In 1841 Edward Hilditch was on the List of Surgeons of the Royal Navy who was fit for service. He was employed at the hospital at Jamaica.

 ....1844

In 1847 it was announced that Edward Hilditch of Jamaica had been appointed to the Bermuda Hospital in place of Dr. Oliver Evans who had been appointed to the position of Deputy Medical Inspector at Plymouth Hospital. (56)

Edward Hilditch was employed at the Royal Naval Hospital at Plymouth in 1861. The Census records him residing there with his wife Jane aged 55 and 50. Edward is employed as Deputy Inspector General of Hospitals. Also employed at the Naval Hospital at this time was surgeon Robert Beith.

Edward Hilditch was knighted and in 1859 was named honorary physician to the queen.

He was included in the Medical Register of 1865 - Qualifications Mem Royal College Surgeons, Eng, 1826, M.D. Marisch College University of Aberdeen 1859.

He died at Bayswater on 24 August 1876 age 71.(57)

 

 

 

HILL, Patrick

 

Patrick Hill was appointed Assistant Surgeon on 28 September 1812.

He was appointed to the Leviathan in 1813.  In 1814 the Leviathan had just returned from the West Indies where 150 of the crew had been affected with fever. She was quarantined on arrival in England and it was after this that Campbell France was appointed to her. (133)

Patrick Hill was appointed Assistant Surgeon to the Salisbury in 1818 (Peter Fisher was also assistant surgeon to the Salisbury at this time). Patrick Hill was promoted to the position of Surgeon to the Raleigh in 1819 (The Edinburgh Magazine)

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on convict ships to New South Wales, Atlas in 1816 and Earl St. Vincent in 1820.

He was appointed to the post of Assistant Surgeon on the Colonial Medical Establishment in 1821, with responsibility for the Medical Department at Liverpool. He married Mary Throsby, niece of Charles Throsby of Glenfield on 12th July 1827. In 1840 they resided in a commodious family house consisting of a dining room, drawing room, four bedrooms, kitchen, laundry, store room and servants' offices, with stables, coach house and an excellent garden, situated on George's River.

Patrick Hill remained at Liverpool for twenty years and when he left in January 1841, he was presented with a handsome service of Plate and an Address by grateful residents. He took up an appointment as Superintendent of the Hospital and the Parramatta Asylum (formerly the Female Factory). In 1848 he was appointed Superintendent of the Parramatta Gaol

Patrick Hill died in March 1852 - On Saturday the 13th instant at his farm, in the county of Camden, Patrick Hill, surgeon in the Royal Navy, after a few hours illness in the 58th year o his age.

Patrick Hill was an acquaintance of surgeon Campbell France. Select State Library of NSW  to find out more about Patrick Hill and  correspondence between Patrick Hill and Campbell France written in 1833.

....1824

 

  

HISLOP, Joseph

 

Joseph Hislop was employed as surgeon on the convict ships Nile which arrived in New South Wales in December 1801

 

 

HOGAN, John

 

John Hogan was employed as surgeon on the Marquis Cornwallis in 1796.

 

 

 

HUGHES, Joseph Hugh R.N., *19 August 1805

 

Joseph Hugh Hughes was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Chapman to VDL in 1826

He was employed as surgeon superintendent on the convict ship Elizabeth in 1828

Joseph H. Hughes was on the List of Retired Navy Surgeons in 1841

3rd September 1859 - At Islington, aged 87, Joseph Hugh Hughes, surgeon in the Royal Navy. The deceased was grandson and heir of George Baron Sempill and Elliottstown, of Renfrew, N.B., whose titles and estates were forfeited as a consequence of the great Rebellion of 1745. (Annual Register)

 

  

HUGHES, Richard

 

Richard Hughes was employed as surgeon on the convict ships -

Aeolus  in 1809

Providence in 1811

General Hewitt in 1814

 

 

 
HUME, Archibald * 17 August 1815

 

Archibald Hume was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Guildford  in 1818 and the Coromandel in 1820

(Edinburgh Magazine 1822)

 

 

 

HUNTER, James *3 October 1814

 

James Hunter was entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers in 1814

He was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ships Minerva  in 1818 and Prince Regent  in 1820

After the voyage of the Prince Regent in 1820 James Hunter offered his services to Philip Parker King who was searching for a surgeon to join his third expedition on the Mermaid.  King was grateful for the presence of an experienced surgeon on the expedition......I accepted the proffered services of a young man who was strongly recommended by his Excellency the Governor, and he was on the point of joining me, when a surgeon of the navy, Mr. James Hunter, who had just arrived in charge of a convict ship, volunteered his services, which were gladly accepted, and he was immediately attached to the Mermaidís establishment. The accession of a surgeon to our small party relieved me of a greater weight of anxiety than I can describe; and, when it is considered that Mr. Hunter left an employment of a much more lucrative nature, to join an arduous service in a vessel whose only cabin was scarcely large enough to contain our mess-table, and which afforded neither comfort nor convenience of any description, I may be allowed here to acknowledge my thanks for the sacrifice he made.

On 20th July at Port Bowen James Hunter and explorer Allan Cunningham spent the day ranging about the vicinity of the shore whilst Mr. Roe with a boars crew was employed in filling empty water casks from a gully at the back of the beach. (1)

In August 1820 he was appointed to a Medical Board of Enquiry to investigate and report on the qualifications of certain persons who were practising surgery and medicine without qualifications. He returned to England on the Shipley early in 1821 and was again employed as surgeon on the Princess Royal in 1823

 

 

 
HUNTER, Thomas  *24 April 1813

 

There were two Surgeons by the name of Thomas Hunter entered in the Navy List of Medical Officers of 1814. (Thomas Hunter * 24 April 1813 and Thomas Hunter * 18 May 1796)

Thomas Hunter was appointed assistant surgeon to the Ardent in 1809

Thomas Hunter was employed as Surgeon Superintendent on the convict ship Competitor in 1828

 

 

 

 

 

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