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Australian Slang and Unique Phrases


Last Updated 24 May 2020



Humping Bluey.....Humping Bluey




According to Watkin Tench who who arrived on the Charlotte with the First Fleet in 1788.... 'A leading distinction, which marked the convicts on their outset in the colony, was a use of what is called the Flash or kiddy language. In some of our early courts of justice an interpreter was frequently necessary to translate the deposition of the witness and the defence of the prisoner. I have ever been of opinion that an abolition of this unnatural jargon would open the path to reformation. And my observations on these people have constantly instructed me that indulgence in this infatuating cant is more deeply associated with depravity and continuance in vice than is generally supposed.'

James Hardy Vaux author of Vocabulary of the Flash Language, Australia's first dictionary, penned at Newcastle in 1812, wrote that 'to speak good flash is to be well versed in cant terms'. Vaux' Vocabulary of the Flash Language lays down many words that can still be found in our language today, e.g.,....croak = to die; bolt = to run. Others have long fallen into disuse e.g., chant = dwelling place; cly-faker = pickpocket.

Just as words from the flash language have disappeared, so too are some slang words disappearing from our language e.g., cobber = mate; blow = to boast. In their place come new words eg., sus = suspicious; blind = drunk. There are so many more that could be added to the list below. Missing are those with racial undertones as well as many words and phrases that are crude or offensive. Many new slang words are also not included, partly because they have not stood the test of time but also because they would fill another page!

A


ABSENTEE - a runaway convict
A BAKER'S DOZEN - 13 of something
ABDUL - Turkish soldier WW1
ABSO-BLOODY-LUTELY - beyond doubt; you better believe it
A BUM - 'Any boss who sacks anyone for not turning up today is a bum' - said by Prime Minister Bob Hawke following Australia's victory in the 1983 America's Cup
ACCADACCA - slang for ACDC rock band
ACE - excellent
ACE - WW1 pilot who had shot down 5 or more enemy aircraft
ACE IT UP - be asked to improve performance
A COLD ONE – Beer
ACROSS THE DITCH - to cross the Ditch means crossing the Tasman Sea to Australia from New Zealand, or vice versa
ACT - Australian Capitol Territory - Canberra
ACT THE GOAT - behave foolishly
A CUP OF TEA, A BEX AND A GOOD LIE DOWN - marketing phrase for APC powders in 1960's
ADD INSULT TO INJURY - to make things worse than they already are
A DEAD CERT - horse race that is sure to win
A DETERMINED SOUL WILL DO MORE WITH A RUSTY MONKEY WRENCH THAN A LOAFER WILL ACCOMPLISH WITH ALL THE TOOLS IN A MACHINE SHOP - Robert Hughes.
ADFA - Australian Defence Force Academy
A DINGO TOOK MY BABY - A cry by Lindy Chamberlain in 1980 when she found her baby missing
ADVANCE AUSTRALIA - Portrait of Caroline Chisholm painted by A.C. Hayter
ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR - Australia's National Anthem
AERIAL PING PONG - Australia Rules Football
A FEW STUBBIES SHORT OF A SIX PACK - a little slow
A FEW SANDWICHES SHORT OF A PICNIC - a little slow
A FROG IN THE THROAT - a sore throat
AGGRO - aggressive
A HAIR PAST A FRECKLE - response when asked the time
AH WELL! IT'S COME TO THIS AT LAST - reported to be the last words of Ned Kelly
AIN'T - abbreviation of is not
AIR CON - Air conditioning
AIRY FAIRY - vague
AKUBRA - wide brimmed felt hat
A LEGEND - a great bloke
'ALF A MO - fraction of a second
ALICE, (THE) - Alice Springs
A LIFE LIVED IN FEAR IS A LIFE HALF LIVED - from Baz Luhrmann's movie Strictly Ballroom
ALL FROTH AND NO BEER - superficial, no substance
ALL IN - exhausted
ALL THE GO - in vogue
ALL THE WAY WITH LBJ - a remark made by Prime Minister Harold Holt while visiting President Lyndon B. Johnson at the White House during the Vietnam War era
ALL TIP AND NO ICEBERG - Paul Keating describing Peter Costello
ALL TO PIECES - to fall away
ALL OVER HIM LIKE A RASH - can't keep his hands to himself
ALL OVER RED ROVER - finished
ALL PISS AND VINEGAR - sour, trouble making person
ALL YOUR CHRISTMASES HAVE COME AT ONCE - unexpected good luck
ALWAYS BACK THE HORSE NAMED SELF-INTEREST,SON. IT'LL BE THE ONLY ONE TRYING" - Jack Lang
AMBER FLUID - beer
AMBO - paramedic
APM - 1. A Permanent malingerer. 2. Assistant provost marshall, an unpopular staff officer
AMSCRAY - scram
ANKLE BITER - child
ANNIVERSARY DAY - Australia Day was first known as Anniversary Day - Celebration of the raising of the British Flag in Sydney Cove on 26 January 1788
ANNUAL - a bath
ANTS PANTS - a person who thinks they are just the best
ANY TICK OF THE CLOCK - about to happen soon
ANZAC - Australian and New Zealand Army Corp
ANZAC BISCUITS -sent to soldiers in WW1, because they were able to keep for a long time
ANZAC BUTTON - nail used instead of a trouser button (WW1)
ANZAC DAY RULE - a tradition in Canberra that heaters should not be used before Anzac Day
ANZAC SOUP - shell hole water polluted by a corpse (soldier slang WW1)
ANZAC WAFER - army biscuit (WW1)
A PENNY SHORT OF A POUND - someone who is a bit stupid/slow
APPLE ISLE - Tasmania
ARCHIE - anti aircraft shell /gun WW1
ARC UP - to lose your temper
ARE YOUR EARS PAINTED ON? Someone who doesn't listen
ARGUE THE TOSS - dispute a decision
ARGY BARGY - argument
AROUND THE TWIST - insane
ARSE OVER TIT - falling over
ARSE UP - upside down
ARSE WIPE - an idiot; unpleasant person
ARSEY - lucky
ARVO – Afternoon
A SHINGLE SHORT - wrong in the head
AS HAPPY AS LARRY - very happy
AS POPULAR AS A POLLY WAFFLE IN A PUBLIC POOL - not very popular at all
AS SCARCE AS HEN'S TEETH - very rare/ hard to find
AS SMOOTH AS SILK - everything went ok
AS TOUGH AS A UTE FULL OF MALLEE ROOTS - tough, hardy
AS USEFUL AS TITS ON A BULL - useless
ASH WEDNESDAY BUSHFIRES - a series of bushfires that occurred in south-eastern Australia on 16 February 1983
ASHES, (THE) - Ongoing series of Cricket Tests between Australia and England
AURORA AUSTRALIS - southern hemisphere atmospheric phenomenon that be seen from Tasmania, New Zealand and Antarctica during winter months. Similar to Northern lights
AUSSIE/S - abbreviation of Australian. Often refers to Australian-born citizens of Anglo-Celtic descent
AUSSIE SALUTE – Wave to shoo the flies
AUSTRALIA DAY - The official national day of Australia. Celebrated annually on 26 January, it is anniversary of the 1788 arrival of the First Fleet and the raising of the Flag of Great Britain at Sydney Cove by Governor Arthur Phillip
AUSTRALIAN CRAWL - freestyle swimming stroke coined early 1900s
AUSTRALIA FELIX - Latin for 'fortunate Australia' or 'happy Australia'. The name given by Sir Thomas Livingstone Mitchell to lush pasture in parts of western Victoria in 1836.
AUSTRALIAN GRIP - a hearty handshake. The bushman shakes hands very heartily - a long grip with the whole hand, following three deep shakes. He does not crush your hand but is sarcastic about the limp shakes and one finger shakes of people out from England (c.1890)
AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE - mounted troops with characteristics of both cavalry and mounted infantry, who served in the Second Boer War and World War I
AUSTRALIA'S GOLDEN GIRL - Olympian Betty Cuthbert
AVAGOODWEEKEND - Have a good weekend
AVO - Avocado
AWAKE - to know all
AWAY WITH THE PIXIES - day dreaming
AWNING OVER THE TOY SHOP - man's beer gut
AXLE GREASE - butter
AY? - what did you say?



B

BAAL - indigenous term for disapproval
BABBLING BROOK - The Cook (soldier slang WW1)
BABBLER - shortened version of above
BACK BLOCKS - away from the city
BACK CHAT - answer back (WW1)
BACK OF BEYOND - very far away
BACK OF BOURKE - somewhere out of the way/ isolated
BACK HANDER - to give a bribe
BACK OUT - retreat from difficulty
BACKSHEA - something for nothing (soldier slang WW1)
BACK SLUM - a back room, a back entrance
BACK THE BARRER - to intervene without invitation on a conversation
BAD EGG - dishonest person BAD TROT - period of misfortune
BAD CASE OF THE TROTS - diarrhoea
BAG - to criticise someone behind their back
BAGGY GREEN - cap worn by Australian Test cricketer
BAGS - a big quantity
BAGS - to have first choice
BAGMAN - swagman; tramp
BAIL - To cancel plans.
BAIL UP - secure cattle by means of a bail
BAIL UP - bushranger term. To rob someone
BAKED - tired out. Because meat put in the oven is said to be baked when it is done, a man who is done up or done, is said to be baked (c.1890)
BALD AS A BANDICOOT - having no hair
BALI BOMBING - On 12 October 2002, two bombs triggered by suicide bombers exploded at Kuta in Bali. 202 people killed including 88 Australians
BALIBO FIVE - The Balibo Five was a group of journalists for Australian television networks who were killed in the period leading up to the Indonesian invasion of East Timor in 1975
BALL AND CHAIN - wife; also trouble and strife
BALLS UP - error, bad mistake
BALONEY - ridiculous; a bunch of baloney. Also ?luncheon meat in NSW (Bologne)
BANANA BENDER - coming from Queensland
BANANA REPUBLIC - In 1986 Paul Keating remarked that the economy was in danger of turning Australia into a banana Republic (politically unstable country with an economy dependent upon the exportation of a limited-resource product, such as bananas or minerals)
BANANAS (going) - going crazy
BANDICOOT - fossick for gold in previously worked ground
BAND OF HOPE - lemon syrup
B AND S BALL - Bachelor and Spinster's Ball- a singles dance held in rural areas
BANGED UP - pregnant
BANGERS - sausages
BANGS LIKE A DUNNY DOOR IN A CYCLONE - sexually promiscuous woman
BANJO - shovel
BANKER - river in flood - 'And every creek a banker ran, And dams filled overtop; We'll all be rooned, said Hanrahan, If this rain doesn't stop'. 'Said Hanrahan', a poem written by Australian bush poet John O'Brien
BANKSIA MAN - from May Gibbs Snugglepot and Cuddlepie
BANTUM - a hot headed person
B-A-R - safe place/ home in various children's games
BARBEQUE STOPPER - a topic of great public interest, esp. political
BARBIE – Barbecue
BARCOO BUSTER - westerly wind outback Qld
BARCOO ROT - ulcers that won't heal
BARCOO SALUTE - Aussie fly swat/ wave of the hand (also bush salute)
BARE BELLIED JOE (EWE) - a ewe with hardly any wool on its belly
BARNEY - dispute; fight
BAROMETER - gas helmet (soldier slang WW1)
BARRA - barramundi
BARRACK - cheer for a sporting team
BARRY CROCKER - a shocker; awful
BASH - wild party
BASH - Someone's ear - talk at length; boring
BASKET CASE - a crazy person
BAT - tool used in two up
BAT - old bat = old woman
BATS - crazy
BATHERS – Swimsuit ; togs, swimmers
BATHURST BURR - Australian plant; annoying person
BATTERED SAV - A saveloy which has been battered, deep fried and served with tomato sauce
BATTERED SAV - Australian comedy duo Roy & HG commentary of Sydney 2000 Olympic Games defined battered sav as a gymnast move when a male gymnast pushes his groin to the floor and 'batters' his 'sav'
BATTLEAXE - (OLD) - derogatory term for an older woman. Often mother in law
BATTLE OF BEERSHEBA - Light horse men usually fought dismounted, using their horses as transport to the battlefield and as a means of swift retreat. A famous exception was the charge of the 4th and 12th Light Horse Regiments at Beersheba on 31 October 1917
BATTLE OF BEERSHEBA COMMEMORATIONS - Commemorations of the Battle of Beersheba occur at the memorial in Canberra every year on 31 October
BATTLE OF LONE PINE - Gallipoli 1915
BATTLER - working class, underdog
BAZZA - Barry
BEAK - nose
BEAK - Magistrate
BEAL - aboriginal drink
BEAN COUNTER - accountant
BEANIE - hat worn in winter
BEANO - feast, gala affair
BEATEN BY A BLOW - line from song Click go the Shears, blow being shearing term for a run of the shears
BEAT AROUND THE BUSH - saying a lot without much meaning
BEAT IT - move off quickly
BEAT THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS OUT OF - violent thrashing
BEAUTY! – excellent.
BEAUTY BOTTLER - excellent
BEAVER HAT- made of imitation beaver fur
BEEF - complaint
BEER GOGGLES - while drunk, to think something is better than it is
BEER GUT - fat tummy
BEER O'CLOCK - time to have a beer
BEETLING ABOUT - flying aimlessly (1918)
BEG YOUR'S - I beg your pardon, what did you say/ mean?
BELL TOPPER - tall silk hat
BELL'S LINE OF ROAD - named for Archibald Bell Junior who at the age of nineteen years discovered a route across the Blue Mountains
BELLWETHER SEAT - An electoral district where voters have historically chosen a candidate from the election-winning party in a series of elections
BEYOND THE BLACK STUMP - imaginary isolated place; outback
BIBLE BASHER - vocal about religious convictions
BICKIE - biscuit
BIDDY BIDDY - kind of burr
BIFF - a hard strike around the head
BIG BICKIES - a lot of money
BIG NOTE - to brag about yourself
BIG SMOKE - the city
BIG WIG - authoritative person
BILLABONG - A pond in a dry riverbed
BILLY – can to boil water over open fire
BILLY BARLOW IN AUSTRALIA - an original song by Benjamin Pitt Griffin of Maitland published in the Maitland Mercury in 1844
BILLY CART - child's go cart; also billy goat cart
BILLY LIDS - kids
BIN CHICKEN - also Tip Turkey. Ibis (bird) regarded as a pest in Australia because of scavenging
BINDI-EYE - weed with sharp barbs. Also known as Joeys or Jo Jos
BINGLE - small car accident
BINT - a woman
BIONIC EAR - Cochlear implant invented by Professor Graeme Clark, Melbourne University in the 1970s
BIRD - a quaint person
BIRDIE - General Sir William Riddell Birdwood - British Army officer who was Commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915
BIRDSVILLE RACES - Horse races held each year in September in Birdsville, Queensland
BIRDSVILLE TRACK - Once a 520 km stock route, it has become popular 4WD drive.
BIRTHDAY SUIT - naked
BITE - put the bite on; ask for loan
BITE YOUR BUM - be quiet
BITIES - biting insects eg mosquitoes
BIT OF A BROTHEL' - bit of a mess
BIT OF A YARN - have a chat together
BIT OF FLUFF - girl; derogatory
BITSER - a mongrel dog. A bit of this a bit of that
BLACK ARM BAND HISTORY - Polarising term first used by Australian historian Geoffrey Blainey in his 1993 Sir John Latham Memorial Lecture
BLACK BOX - flight recorder invented by David Warren 1954
BLACK HAWK TRAGEDY - Military Aviation disaster. In June 1996 near Townsville during a Black Hawk training exercise involving the Special Air Service (SASR) Regiment and Army Aviation Corps 18 men died when two helicopters collided mid-air and crashed
BLACK FRIDAY BUSHFIRES - Victoria on 13 January 1939. Among the worst natural bushfires in the world. 71 people died
BLACK SATURDAY BUSHFIRES - a series of bushfires that ignited or were burning across Victoria on and around Saturday, 7 February 2009. 173 fatalities
BLACK TRACKER - Aboriginal used to track criminals
BLIGHTY - home (England) - a wound severe enough to be returnd to Britain for hospitalisation. Soldier Slang WW1
BLIMEY - Exclamation of astonishment
BLIND - drunk
BLIND FREDDY COULD HAVE SEEN THAT- to state the obvious
BLIND FREDDY - if Blind Freddy jumped off a cliff, would you? - don't be a follower
BLINKY BILL - Australian children's book character created by Dorothy Wall
BLOB - a fool
BLOCK - parcel of land BLOKE - man
BLOKEY - behaving in a manly way
BLOODS WORTH BOTTLING - a valuable person
BLOODY – Very. Used to extenuate a point
BLOODY HELL - expressing displeasure
BLOODY OATH – yes; or it's true.
BLOODY RIPPER - really awesome
BLOTTO - drunk - beyond capacity to stand up
BLOW - to boast
BLOW A FUSE - lose your temper
BLOW A PLUGGER - breaking the toe divide in a thong (flip flop)
BLOWER - telephone
BLOWIE - blow fly
BLOW IN - arriving univited
BLOW ME DOWN - expression of astonishment
BLOW ME DOWN WITH A FEATHER - expression of astonishment
BLOW THE FROTH OFF A FEW - have a few glasses of beer
BLOW YOUR DOUGH - spend all your money
BLOW YOUR OWN TRUMPET - skite
BLUBBER - to cry
BLUDGER – Someone who’s lazy, generally also who relies on others
BLUE - make a mistake
BLUE - argue, fight
BLUE BOTTLES - stinging marine creatures that wash up on the beaches, often on the east coast under a northeasterly wind
BLUE HEELER - Australian cattle dog breed
BLUE HEELER - police
BLUE RIBBON SEAT - An electorate that has consistently voted for the same member or party over a long period of time therefore making it a safe seat
BLUE SHIRT - garment worn by a gold digger
BLUE SWIMMER - crab
BLUE TONGUE - lizard indigenous to Australia BLUEY / BLUE- red head
BLUEY - a swag carried by sundowners and called after the blue blankets that were common at the time
BLUFF - bumptious
BOARD BUMPS - bumps on surfers' from knee paddling
BOARDIES - boardshorts
BOB - shilling
BOBBY - a policeman
BOBBY DAZZLER - something very good
BOBBY PIN - two pronged device for pinning back hair
BOB'S YOUR UNCLE - everything is ok
BODGIE - bad job
BODGIE AND WIDGIE - youth subculture in the 1950s
BODYLINE - cricketing tactic devised by the English cricket team for their 1932–33 Ashes tour of Australia, specifically to combat the extraordinary batting skill of Australia's Don Bradman.
BOGAN – uncultured person; uncouth, ocker
BOGEY - swimming hole
BOGGED - when vehicle is stuck in mud or sand
BOGRAT /BOGGY - junior pilot - someone who is qualified, but not a QFI/FC Instructor (military)
BOG IN - eat up!
BOG ROLL - toilet paper
BOILER - an old woman
BOLTER - runaway convict
BOKO - nose (WW2) BOMB - an old car
BOMBED - high on drugs
BOMBING OF DARWIN - During wartime on 19 February 1942, 188 Japanese planes were launched against Darwin
BOMBORA - indigenous Australian term for an area of large sea waves breaking over a shallow reef
BOMMIE - shortened verson of above
BONDI BEACH - famous Australian beach in Sydney
BONDIE CIGAR - exretement floating in the surf
BONDI ICEBERGS - a group of people who swim at Bondi beach in winter. Established 1929
BONKERS - crazy
BONZER - awesome
BOOB - cell (Army 1945)
BOOFHEAD - fool; idiot
BOOKIE - short for bookmaker
BOOMER - large kangaroo
BOOTS AND ALL - wholeheartedly
BOOZE BUS – Police vehicle used to catch drunk drivers
BORED SHITLESS - bored to death
BOSS COCKY - employer, supervisor
BOTANY BAY BAR-FLY - referring to early Sydney people drinking habits
BOTTLE-O – Bottle Shop, - a place to buy alcohol
BOTTLER - excellent, exceptional
BOTTOM OF THE HARBOUR SCHEME - referred to destroying company records and dumping them in the Sydney harbour 1970s. Tax avoidance
BOUNDARY RIDER - stockman on a sheep or cattle station who regularly checks boundary fences and rounds up stray stock
BOX - Television
BOX HEAD - a term used to describe Macedonian people.
BOXHEAD - Paul Keating to Wilson Tuckey: 'You boxhead you wouldn't know. You are flat out counting past ten.'
BOXING KANGAROO - The boxing kangaroo served as the symbol for the successful Australian challenge for the America's Cup in 1983
BOY CHARLTON - Andrew Murray who was an Australian freestyle swimmer c. 1920s and 30s was known as Boy Charlton. He won gold in the 1500 m freestyle at Paris Olympics
BRASS RAZOO - broke; no money
BREAK THE ICE - to begin
BREATHER - take a rest
BREKKIE - breakfast
BRICKFIELDER - westerly dusty wind, Sydney 1800s
BRICKIE - bricklayer
BRIGHT AS A BUTTON - very intelligent
BRIGHT EYED AND BUSHY TAILED - in good spirits
BRING A PLATE - contribute to event by bringing a plate of food to share
BRING ME BACK ALIVE - an anti aircraft man (WW2)
BRISBANE BRONCOS - Rugby League team based in Brisbane
BRISVEGAS - Brisbane
BROKE - having no money
BRONZED AUSSIES - sun baked beach boys
BROLLY – Umbrella
BRUCE – An Aussie Bloke
BRUMBY - wild horse
BRUMMY - false
BUBBLER - drinking fountain
BUCK - resist
BUCKLEY'S CHANCE - no chance at all
BUCK'S NIGHT - celebration for a bride groom put on by his mates
BUILT LIKE A BRICK SHIT-HOUSE - large sturdy physical build
BUSCKSHEE - something for nothing, free (1918)
BUCKSHEE BREAD - over the usual ration of bread
BUCK UP - to gain courage
BUDGIE / BUDGERIGAR - small Australian parakeet
BUDGIE SMUGGLERS – Speedos
BUG-A-LUGS - term of endearment to child
BUGGER - bad luck
BUGGER ALL - to have nothing
BUGGER ME - to be surprised
BUGGER OFF - go away; get lost
BUGGERED - exhausted
BUGGERED - having no idea
BUGGERISE AROUND - messing around
BULL - a lie
BULLAMAKANKA - middle of nowhere; mythical
BULL DUST - rubbish! nonsense!
BULL DUST - fine red dust found in the Australia Outback
BULLET - got fired, sacked
BULLSHIT - a lie
BULLSHIT ARTIST - a liar
BUM FLUFF - hair on the face
BUMMER - a cadger
BUMPER - butt of cigarette
BUM STEER - mislead someone deliberately
BUNDLE, DROP THE - show cowardice
BUNDOOK - a rifle (soldier slang WW1)
BUNDY - Bundaberg rum
BUNG - to put something in somewhere
BUNG - broken, exhausted. Aboriginal
BUNG ON AN ACT - feign superiority
BUNGER - large fire cracker
BUNK - abscond or do a bunk
BUNNY - fall guy
BUNYIP - mythical outback creature
BUNYIP ARISTOCRACY - an Australian term satirising attempts to develop a titled aristocracy in the NSW government.
BURGOO - porridge (soldier slang WW1)
BURL - to try anything. Give it a burl
BURNING THE MIDNIGHT OIL - working late
BURNT CHOP SYNDROME - mothers giving the best food or item to others in the family and having what is left
BUSH BAPTIST - a person of uncertain religion; someone who does not claim or admit affiliation with a particular church
BUSH BASHING - go off road
BUSH BRIDE - a woman who is married in country Australia. Sometimes used disparagingly to denote lack of sophistication
BUSH CHOOK - emu
BUSH LAWYER - claiming to have legal knowledge but unqualified
BUSH, THE – in the country away from cities and town
BUSH SALUTE - Aussie fly swat / wave of the hand (also Barcoo Salute)
BUSH SCRUBBER - a bumpkin or slatternly person who came from the scrub. c1896
BUSH TELEGRAPH - gossip network
BUSH WEEK - When country folk come to the city
BUSHED - exhausted
BUSHIE/BUSHY - country person
BUSHRANGER - outlaw, highwayman
BUSHWHACKER - a person who lives in the bush
BUSTED - caught doing something wrong
BUTT IN - intrude
BUTTINSKI - an intruding person
BUZZ OFF - go away
BY A CAT'S WHISKER - just in time
BY CRIKEY - exclamation of surprise
BY JINGO or BY JINGOS - expression of astonishment at something good
BYO - Bring your own

C

CABBAGE HEAD - NSW term for a person from Victoria
CABBAGE TREE HAT - unique colonial hat made from cabbage tree palm leaves
CABBAGE TREE HAT MOB - Australian born men who formed the first cricket teams in Australia c. 1820's.
CAB SAV – Cabernet Sauvignon
CACTUS – useless, broken; malfunctioning equipment (WW2)
CACKY HANDED - left handed
CADY - hat
CAKE HOLE - mouth
CALL IT A DAY - finish for the day
CALL IT QUITS - to stop
CAMP DRAFTING - unique Australian sport involving a horse and rider working cattle
CAN - toilet (dunny can)
CANNING STOCK ROUTE - the world’s longest stock route. Used to drive cattle from the Kimberley to the railhead at Wiluna, WA early 1900s
CAN'T PUT IN WHAT GOD LEFT OUT - without natural talent
CAN'T TAKE A TRICK - unlucky
CAPTAIN'S CALL - decision made by a leader without consultation
CAPTAIN COOK - have a look
CARBIE - carburettor
CARDIE - cardigan
CARK IT - Die
CARRY ON LIKE A PORK CHOP - over react
CASTLE HILL REBELLION - convict uprising in 1804
CATCH YOU ROUND LIKE A RISSOLE - See you later
CAT'S PYJAMAS - very special
CATTLE DUFFER - cattle rustler; stealer of cattle
CATWALK - wired alleyway between compounds (Army 1945)
CELESTIAL - an immigrant from China during gold rush days
CHANNEL COUNTRY - a Region of outback Australia in Queensland South Australia, Northern Territory and NSW. The name comes from the numerous intertwined rivulets that cross the region
CHARDONNAY SOCIALIST derogatory for someone who enjoys affluent lifestyle but espouses left wing views
CHARGE LIKE A WOUNDED BULL - charge a high price for something
CHARGE OF THE 4TH LIGHT HORSE AT BEERSHEBA - Known as the Battle of Beersheba. 31 October 1917. Remembered as the last great cavalry charge
CHATEAU DE CARDBOARD cask of wine
CHATTER BOX - Lewis gun (soldier slang WW2)
CHATTY - Affected with French vermin (soldier slang WW1)
CHEAP AS CHIPS - very cheap
CHEAP DRUNK - person who becomes drunk quickly
CHECK IT OUT - look at that
CHECK OUT CHICK - supermarket cashier
CHERIOS - small sausages from delicatesan
CHEESED OFF - annoyed about something
CHEWING THE FAT - have a talk
CHEW IT OVER - talk it over
CHEWY- chewing gum
CHIACK - to tease or jeer
CHICK - girl
CHICKEN OUT - too scared to join in
CHICK FLICK - a movie that women like
CHICKEN HEARTED - a coward
CHICKEN SALT - flavoured salt to sprinkle on chips etc
CHICKEN STRANGLERS - soldiers capable of living off the land
CHICKEN WING TACKLE - A move in Australian rules football and rugby league, in which a player locks an opponent's arm so that he or she cannot legally move the ball. Coined by Fox Sports NRL Producer Geoff Bullock in 2008
CHIKO ROLL - deep-fried snack food
CHILDERS BACKPACKERS HOSTEL FIRE - On 23 June 2000, the backpackers' hostel was destroyed by a deliberately-lit fire. Eighty-eight people occupied the hostel at the time of the fire; fifteen died
CHIN WAG - a long talk
CHIPPIE - carpenter
CHIT-CHAT - a talk
CHIVVY - back talk, lip (WW2)
CHOCCY BICKY – Chocolate Biscuit
CHOCOLATE CRACKLES - children's party food made from rice bubbles
CHOCKA BLOCK – Full
CHOCK AND LOG FENCES - rough timber fences made in 1860s before the use of wire became widespread
CHOCKERS - full up
CHOCS - soldiers who were believed to be unwilling to fight (WW1)
CHOOF OFF - leave
CHOOK– Chicken
CHOOK RAFFLE - held in the local pub
CHOOK SHED – Chicken shed
CHOOM - English soldier - WW1
CHOPPERS - teeth
CHOP UP - division of spoils
CHRISSIE – Christmas
CHROME DOME - a bald man
CHUCK - throw
CHUCK A LEFTY - turn left
CHUCK A SPAZ - angry; tantrum
CHUCK A TANTY - have a tantrum
CHUCK A U-EY - do a U-turn
CHUCK OFF AT - to sneer at
CHUCK UP - vomit
CHUCK A WOBBLY - throw a tantrum
CHUCKING A DUMMY - fainting on parade (soldier slang WW1)
CHUMP - a simpleton
CHUNDER - vomit
CIGGY– a Cigarette
CLAGGED OUT - worn out
CLANCY'S GONE TO QUEENSLAND DROVING, AND WE DON'T KNOWN WHERE HE ARE - line from Banjo Paterson's poem 'Clancy of the Overflow'
CLANGER - make an ill-timed or inappropriate comment
CLAP - gonorrhoea
CLAYTONS - substitute for the real thing
CLEAN UP AUSTRALIA DAY - rubbish cleanup campaign done by volunteers co-founded by Ian Kiernan and Kim McKay
CLEAR AS MUD - complicated, unclear
CLEAR SKINS (also CLEANSKINS) - unbranded young stock running wild
CLICK GO THE SHEARS - iconic Australian bush ballad. 1890s
CLINCH - agree; clinch a deal
CLINER - young unmarried female
CLINK - gaol
CLOBBER - suit of clothes
CLOBBER - gear or pack (Army 1945)
CLODHOPPERS - heavy shoe or foolish awkward person
CLOUT - hard blow
CLOWN - fool, idiot
CLUCKY – feeling maternal
C'MON AUSSIE C'MON - World Series Cricket slogan
COALOPOLIS - refers to the city of Newcastle
COATHANGER - Sydney Harbour Bridge
COBB AND CO. - Pioneered road transport in Australia. Their horse-drawn coaches carried passengers and mail from 1853 to the 1920s.
COBBER – Very good friend.
COBBER - Chocolate coated caramel lolly
COBBLER - last sheep to be shorn
COBRAH - Bush Tucker. Obtained from timber which had been in the river. Small round looking beetle which changes to become a large whitish looking worm ; teredo navalis
COCK AND BULL STORY - a tall tale
COCKATOO - a person posted to keep lookout during illegal activities. esp. during two-up
COCKATOO FENCE - a rough fence made of logs and saplings before the use of wire became widespread
COCKATOO WEATHER - fine by day, rain at night
COCK-EYED BOB - small whirlwind; also called willy-willy or dust-devil
COCKIE - Native Australian bird
COCKIE - person who owns a small farm
COCKROACH - person from NSW
COCKY'S JOY - golden syrup spread
CODS WALLOP - unbelievable
COLDIE– Beer. ‘Come over for a few coldie’s mate.’
COME A CROPPER - to fall; or have a setback
COME ACROSS - bestow sexual favours
COME A GUTZER/GUTSER - fall heavily (WW1)
COME-DOWN - a disappointment
COME GOOD - turn out alright
COME IN ON THE GROUTER - take advantage of the misfortune of another
COME IN SPINNER - call at gambling game two-up
COME TO BLOWS - fight- workers
COMFORT FUNDS - shells (soldier slang WW1)
COMPO - workers' compensation
CONCHIE - conscientious objector during war time
CONCRETE MACAROON - army biscuit (WW1)
CONK - nose
CONVICT ATTAINT - (felony attaint) - In England condemned criminals were not allowed to give evidence in court, act for another person or sue in the civil courts. As well their goods were forfeited to the crown. Convict attaint was not removed when sentences were commuted to transportation to a penal colony. Only the expiry of the sentence or a pardon could remove the attaint
COOEE - call out (in the bush)
NOT WITHIN COOEE - figuratively a long way
COOEE MARCH - Recruiting march in WW1
COOK THE BOOKS - falsify accounts
COOLABAH TREE - eucalyptus tree
COOLGARDIE SAFE - uses evaporation to keep food inside cool while protecting it from flies and scavengers. Invented in Coolgardie on W.A. Goldfields in the 1890's by Arthur McCormick
COOT - a person of no account, an outsider
COP - policeman
COP IT SWEET - accept defeat with good grace
COPPER - police man or woman
COP SHOP - police station
CORKER - something that is excellent
CORNSTALK - born in Australia, in the past of convict parents
CORNSTALK - Victorian name for a person from New South Wales.
COTTON ON TO - realise; become friendly
COSSIE - swimsuit; togs; swimmers
COULD HAVE BLOWN ME DOWN WITH A FEATHER - expression of astonishment
COULDN'T PICK A WINNER IN A ONE HORSE RACE - incompetant
COULDN'T CATCH A FLY IN A COUNTRY DUNNY - incompetant
COULDN'T ORGANISE A PISS UP IN A BREWERY - incompetant
COULDN'T LIE STRAIGHT IN BED - untrustworthy
COULDN'T RUN A CHOOK RAFFLE - useless
COUNTER LUNCH - pub lunch
COVE - an individual
COW - it stinks (WW2)
COWARD'S CASTLE - When parliament is used to vilify, abuse others while under parliamentary privilege
COW LICK - piece of curly hair
COWRA P.O.W CAMP OUTBREAK - On 5 August 1944 Japanese prisoners of war (POWs) housed in the detention camp in Cowra a mass outbreak
CRABS - pubic lice
CRACKS - The best stockmen - the best whip crackers.
CRACKER JACK - a good thing
CRACKER NIGHT - Celebrated on the Queens Birthday long weekend. Now Banned
CRACK A BOO - is to divulge a secret
CRACK HARDY - to suppress feelings
CRACK ON TO - to hit on someone; make their acquaintance
CRACK ON TO- understand
CRACK THE WHIP - hurry up
CRACK UP - become exhausted;
CRACK UP - laughing
CRAPPER - toilet
CRAWCHIE - freshwater crayfish (Qld); yabby
CRAWLER - sheep left behind on the road
CREAMED - to be defeated (sport)
CRIB - a house
CRIB - worker's lunch
CRIKEY MATE - Steve Irwin's catch phrase
CROAK - die
CROCK - a load of nonsense
CROOK– Being ill
CROOK AS ROOKWOOD - extremely ill, nearly dead
CROOKED AS A DOG'S HIND LEG - criminal connections
CROOK SPIN - run of bad luck
CROPPER - fall; come a cropper
CROW EATER - person from South Australia
CROW TO PLUCK - to take issue with someone (Maitland 1833, but probably earlier English origin)
CRUDDY - poor quality
CRUELLED THE PITCH - upset arrangements
CRUISY - easy; relaxed
CRUST - earn a crust; earn a living
CRY BABY - sook; easily upset
CUNNING AS A DUNNY RAT - very cunning
CUPPA - cup of tea
CUR - cowardly; mean or dishonest
CURRENCY LADS AND LASSES - The first generation of free children born to convicts in Australia.
CUSHY - easy
CUT LUNCH - sandwiches
CUT OUT THE MIDDLE MAN; FIND SOMEONE YOU HATE AND BUY THEM A HOUSE - quote from mockumentary film 'Kenny'2006
CYCLONE SEASON - cyclone season starts in mid-December and finishes at the end of April
CYCLONE TRACY - Tropical Cyclone Tracy, category 4, struck Darwin in the early hours of 25 December 1974. 71 deaths


D

DAD AND DAVE FROM SNAKE GULLY - radio drama series based on the On Our Selection stories of Steele Rudd
DAG – Someone who’s a bit of a nerd or geek.
DAG - a wag in the crowd (WW1)
DAGGY - unfashionable
DAGWOOD DOG - frankfurter on a stick that is battered and deep-fried
DAISY CUTTER - anti-personnel bomb (WW1)
DAKS– Trousers
DAMPER - bushmans bread cooked on campfire
DANCING - method of robbery at the goldfields
DANDER - anger
DARLING SHOWER - dust storm in the Riverina
DARWIN STUBBY - Northern Territory. Introduced by Carlton & United in 1958 with an 80 fluid ounce (2,270 ml) capacity
DAWN SERVICE - first commemorative event of Anzac Day is the Dawn Service at 4.30 am. This is about the time men of the ANZAC approached the Gallipoli beach 25 April 1915
DAZZA - nickname for Darren
DAZZLER - good looking person
DEACON SKINNER - dinner (soldier slang WW1)
DEAD BEAT - a derelict
DEAD HEAD - a good for nothing
DEAD HEART OF AUSTRALIA - Memoirs written by J.W. Gregory referring to Lake Eyre
DEADLY - excellent; strong
DEAD MEAT TICKETS - identification discs (soldier slang WW1)
DEADSET – True - exactly
DEAD RINGER - exactly the same
DEAD TO THE WORLD - sound asleep
DEANER (DEENER) - A shilling (ww2)
DEAR - expensive
DEAR AUNTIE - a phrase signifying utter weariness or disgust (soldier slang WW1)
DEATH ADDER - machine gun (WW2)
DEEP THINKER - reinforcement soldier who arrived late in the war (soldier slang WW1)
DEMOCRACY SAUSAGE - a colloquial name given to the sausages cooked and eaten as part of the Australian tradition of holding a fundraising sausage sizzle at polling places on election day.
DERO - derelict homeless person
DERRICK'S SHOW - final assault on Sattelberg, New Guinea during WW2 became known as Derrick's Show after Victoria Cross recipient Tom Derrick's bravery during the battle
DERRY - to have a grudge; a feud
DERWENTER - ex convict from VDL
DESERT RATS - Rats of Tobruk. Australian Army soldiers who served in North African campaign WW2
DEVVO – Devastated
DEVON - luncheon meat; called Fritz in S.A.; Polony in W.A.
DIAL - face
DICE IT - throw it out!
DICKEN - disgust; doubt or disbelief
DICKHEAD - an idiot
DICKY - something of low quality or broken
DIDDLE - to cheat
DIDGERIDOO - a wind instrument that was originally found only in Arnhem Land in northern Australia
DIDN'T BAT AN EYELID - gave no reaction to news
DIDNT COME DOWN IN THE LAST SHOWER - not easily duped
DIGGER - Australian soldier ; also gold digger
DIGS - the place you live
DILL - an idiot
DILLYBAG - Aboriginal term; small bag
DILL BRAIN - idiot
DINGBATS - annoyed; crazy
DIGBATS - delerium tremens (c 1920)
DING DONG - fine, swell (WW2)
DINGO - compulsory trainee in the Militia (WW2)
DINGO'S BREAKFAST - no breakfast at all
DINGO FENCE - longest fence in the world. South Australia. Finished 1885
DINKUM - genuine; real
DINKUM OIL - authenticated news (WW1)
DINKY DI - genuine, authentic
DINKY RIDE - double up on a bike. Passenger
DINNER - lunch
DIPSTICK - loser; fool
DIRTY - angry about an injustice
DIRTY BIG - enormous. eg. dirty big truck
DISH IT OUT - to serve roughly
DIVVY - divide into portion
DIVVY - The Store's famous dividend rewarded members for buying goods. Newcastle NSW
DO A HAROLD HOLT - bolt
DO A MELBA - make repeated farewell performances
DOB - report someone to police etc
DODGER - bread (soldier slang WW1)
DODGIE - poor quality
DOE RAY ME - money
DOESN'T MISS A TRICK - doesn't miss an opportunity for advantage
DOG ACT - cowardly, treacherous behaviour
DOGGED IT - didn't show up
DOGGEREE -Go on; go straight ahead (soldier slang WW1)
DOGS BREAKFAST - a total mess
DOG'S EYE - meat pie
DOG'S LEG - Stripe (Army 1945)
DOLE - unemployment payment
DOLE BLUDGER - on who is content to live off social security payments in contrast with one who is genuinely unemployed
DOING A BRADBURY - winning something against the odds, after Steve Bradbury's win at the Winter Olympics
DOING A BUNK - running away
DONE HIS DASH - finshed up; lost opportunity
DONGA - Temporary shelter
DONKEY VOTE - ballot cast in an election where a voter ranks candidates based on the order they appear on the ballot paper
DONKEYS YEARS - a long time
DONE LIKE A DINNER - finished, over with, completed
DON'T COME THE RAW PRAWN WITH ME - Don't try to fool me (WW2)
DON'T GET YOUR KNICKERS IN A KNOT - don't get upset
DON'T KNOW THAT PERSON FROM A BAR OF SOAP - don't know them at all
DON'T PUT ON A PERFORMANCE - don't make a fuss
DON'T YOU EVER LET A CHANCE GO BY, OH LORD - line from Bob Hudson's 1975 hit 'The Newcastle Song'
DON'T YOU WORRY ABOUT THAT - catch cry of Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen
DOORSTOPPING - practice by journalists of conducting a brief interview of politicians at the entrance to a building
DOOVERLACKIE - referring to something you don't have a name for
DOROTHY DIXER - parliamentary question asked of a Minister by a colleague to give the Minister the opportunity to deliver a prepared reply
DOSS - to sleep
DOUBLE D - short for double disillusion, the simultaneous dissolution of both houses of a parliament preparatory to an election
DOUBLE DUTCH - children's skipping game using two ropes
DOUGH - money
DO THE DIRTY - do the wrong thing
DOWN ON - angry with
DOWN THE GURGLER - wasted money, opportunity or effort
DOWN THE STREET - shopping street
DOWNUNDER - coming from Australia
DO YOUR BLOCK - lose your temper
DO YOUR LOLLY - lose your temper
DO YOUR 'NANA - lose your temper
DRAG THE CHAIN - lag behind
DRIBS AND DRABS - a little bit at a time
DRIP - fool
DRIZA BONE COAT - Unique Australian coat
DROGO - rookie
DRONGO - loser, no-hoper
DRONGO - name of a race horse that never won a race in 37 starts. 1920s
DROP A CLANGER - say something embarrassing or inappropriate
DROP BEAR - hoax featuring carnivorous version of a koala
DROP KICK - an idiot; not very smart
DROP THE BUNDLE - give up
DROVER - an experienced stockman, who moves sheep, cattle, and horses over long distances
DROVER'S DOG - one who owns no respect
A DROVER'S DOG COULD LEAD THE PARTY TO VICTORY - Bill Hayden after losing labour leadership
DROVING - driving or moving a herd or flock over a long distance.
DRUM - a brothel
DRUNK AS A SKUNK - blind drunk
DRY AS A DEAD DINGO'S DONGA - thirsty for alcohol
DUD - a failure
DUDS - trousers
DUFFER - a fool
DUFFER - unproductive shaft in gold mine
DUFFER - cattle duffer = cattle rustler
DUG OUT - protective hole dug out of the sides of trenches (WW1)
DUMMY - pacifer for baby
DUMP - centre struck out of the holey dollar. The holey dollar was worth five shillings, and the dump fifteen pence
DUMPER - large strong wave in surf that pushes the surfer to the bottom
DUNNY - outside toilet in a small outhouse at the back of the house used before the septic system
DUNNY MAN - council worker who collected toilet pans and transferred them on his shoulder to the dunny truck
DUNNY ROLL - toilet paper
DUNNO - dont know
DURREY - a cigarette you roll yourself
DUST-DEVIL - small whirlwind; also called willy-willy and cock-eyed bob
DUST UP - a fight

E

EAR BASH - talk non stop
EARLY MARK - let out of school early
EARWIG - eavesdropper
EASY ON - take it easy; slow down
EKKA - Brisbane Exhibition (annual show)
ELBOW GREASE - hard work
EMPIRE DAY - The celebration of Queen Victoria's birthday on May 24 was renamed Empire Day in 1903 after her death in 1901. It was celebrated throughout the British Empire culminating in fireworks and bonfires in the evening. The last celebration of Empire Day in Australia took place in 1958
EMPTIES - empty beer bottles
EMU PARADE - picking up litter in a group
ESKY – An insulated container to keep food and drink cold
EUREKA FLAG - First used in the Eureka Rebellion of 1854. Has a dark blue field with a central white symmetric cross consisting five eight-pointed stars, representing the Crux constellation. The design was first used in the Eureka Rebellion of 1854.
EUREKA STOCKADE - a battle which took place at Ballarat on 3rd December 1854 after diggers’ opposition to miners’ licenses. Often regarded as the birthplace of Australian democracy
EVEN STEVENS - equal after repaying a debt
EVERY COUNTRY NEEDS ITS HEROES, AND WE MUST FOLLOW THEM - Colonel Sir Ernest Edward Weary Dunlop 1907 – 1993 was an Australian surgeon who was renowned for his leadership while being held prisoner by the Japanese during World War II
EVERY MAN AND HIS DOG - extremely crowded place
EVERY DOG HAS ITS DAY - your day will come eventually
EYES LIKE A HAWK - 20/20 vision
EXXY - high price

F

FACELESS MEN - people who wield (especially political) power behind the scenes
FAFF ABOUT - dither
FAG - cigarette
FAIR COW - a louse or heel (WW2)
FAIR CRACK OF THE WHIP - request for fair treatment
FAIR DINKUM – true
FAIR ENOUGH - expression used to concede a point
FAIR GO - to treat someone with fairness and reason
FAIR SHAKE OF THE SAUCE BOTTLE - used several times by Prime Minister Kevin Rudd
FAIR SUCK OF THE SAUCE BOTTLE - be fair (sauce perhaps being booze)
FAIRY BREAD - white buttered bread covered in hundreds and thousands
FAIRY FLOSS - heated sugar spun into threads and eaten from a stick
FANTAILS - chocolate-covered caramels introduced by Sweetacres in 1930. wrappers included brief biographies of movie stars.
FATS - wide tyres
FEBRUARY 14 1966 - introduction of decimal currency to Australia. Accompanied by a famous jingle to the tune of Click Go The Shears
FEDERATION DROUGHT - name given to a prolonged period of drought that began 1895 and reached its peak in 1901 - 1902
FEED THE CHOOKS - to hold a press conference; to feed the media
FELLAS - men
FELL OFF HIS PERCH - died
FELL OUT OF THE UGLY TREE - not attractive to look at
FFF - Forlorn, famished, and far from home (soldier slang WW1)
FIELD DAY - day used to display new farm equipment
FIELDS OF WHEAT - street
FIFO - fly in - fly out - flown in to remote work area and flown back again to town
FIGJAM - Acronym for F.ck I'm good. Just ask me.
FILUM - film, movie picture
FINGER - an eccentric or amusing person
FIRIE - a fireman
FIRST CAB OFF THE RANK - first there
FIT AS A MALLEE BULL - healthy
FITZROY YANK - flashy dresser (WW2)
FIVE EYES - An alliance comprising Australia, Canada, New Zealand, UK and USA for joint cooperation in signals intelligence, military intelligence, and human intelligence
FIVE FINGER DISCOUNT - to steal without getting caught
FIVER - ‎£ 5 note
FIX YOU UP - pay back money
FIZZ-GIG - police informer
FIZZER / FIZZLER - disappointment
FIZZY DRINK - soft drink/ cordial
FLABBERGAST - astonish
FLAG FALL - initial hiring charge for a taxi
FLAKE - shark meat
FLAKE OUT - collapse, lie down
FLAMING GALAH - idiot; stupid person
FLAMIN' HELL - for goodness sake
FLAP THE GUMS - talk endlessly
FLASH - showy
FLANNIE / FLANNO – flannelette shirt
FLAT AS A TACK - low in spirits, lacking energy
FLAT CHAT - doing something quickly
FLAT OUT LIKE A LIZARD DRINKING - busy
FLAT TO THE BOARDS - busy working
FLICK - get rid of
FLIP YOUR LID - to be angry
FLOATING KIDNEY - soldier unattached to a unit (WW1)
FLOG - to steal; also to sell
FLOG - Wanker; someone with ideas above their station
FLOGGED WITH A WARM LETTICE, (LIKE BEING) - Paul Keating re John Hewson's debating skills
FLOGGING A DEAD HORSE - a hopeless cause
FLOORDROBE - leaving clothes on the floor instead of putting them away
FLOORED - knocked down
FLUKE - lucky break
FLUMMOX - perplex
FLUTTER - a small bet on the races
FLYBOG - Jam (WW1)
FLYING OFF THE HANDLE - angry outburst
FLY SCREEN - gauze door screen to keep out flies
FOODIE - lover of gourmet food
FOOTPATH - sidewalk or pavement
FOOTY - Australian Football League (AFL), Rugby Union (Union) or Rugby League (NRL). Not Soccer
FREAK VILLA - the cook house (soldier slang WW1)
FRED - small metal spoon in ADF combat ration pack - Field Ration Eating Device - also F.cking Ridiculous Eating Device
FREDDO FROG - Chocolate lolly Freddo Frog was introduced by MacRobertson’s in Melbourne 1930
FREEBIE - get for free
FREE CHEWING GUM - chin strap (soldier slang WW2)
FREEDOM ON THE WALLABY - A poem by Henry Lawson 1891
FREEDOM RIDE BUS - students from University of Sydney formed a group called the Student Action for Aborigines. Led by Charles Perkins, they travelled into New South Wales country towns
FREEZ-A - a popularity hunter. Origin found in 'for he's a jolly good fellow' (WW1)
FREMANTLE DOCTOR - cooling afternoon wind. Western Australia
FRENCHIE - condom
FREO - Fremantle W.A.
FRIDGE - Refridgerator. In 1855 James Harrison of Geelong was granted a patent for an ether vapour-compression refrigeration system.
FRITZ - luncheon meat; called Devon in NSW; Polony in W.A.
FROG IN A SOCK - energetic
FRONT UP - to turn up
FROTHING - very keen
FRUIT LOOP - crazy person
FUDGE - to cheat
FUGLY - ugly
FULL AS A GOOG - satiated of food or drink
FULL OF BEANS - lots of energy
FULL ON - intense
FUNNY FARM - mental hospital
FURFIC - rumour (soldier slang WW1)
FURPHY - idle rumour. Jewish origin
FX and FJ Holden cars - FX launched in 1948. FJ launched in 1953. FX First mass made locally produced car

G

GABBA - Brisbane cricket ground at Woolloongabbaba
G'DAY – Hello
GALAH – a noisy, stupid person.
GALLIPOLI GALLOP - dysentery (WW1)
GALLOOT - clumsy, foolish man
GAME AS NED KELLY - brave
GAMMON - to deceive
GAMMY LEG - crippled or injured leg
GANDER - take a look
GARBAGE GUTS- greedy
GARBOS - garbologists; garbage collectors
GAZZA - short for Garry
GAZZOB - a fool or a blunderer
GEE GEES - race horses
GEEK - take a look
GEE WHIZZ - expressing surprise
GET A GUERNSEY - receive an award
GET A HANDLE ON - understand
GET A WRIGGLE ON - hurry up
GET DOWN OFF YOUR HIGH HORSE - stop acting superior
GET THE DRIFT - understand
GET OFF THE GRASS - unbelievable; tell the truth
GET ON YOUR GOAT - someone annoying you
GET STUFFED - dismissal after a disagreement
GET THE WIND UP - soldier slang for a scare (WW1)
GETTING OFF AT REDFERN - referrring to contraceptive technique
GET YOUR DANDER UP - get upset
GIBBER - a small rock
GIBBER - GUNYAH - home in a cave; aboriginal
GILGAI - aboriginal word meaning small waterhole
GINGER BEERS - engineers (military)
GINGER MEGS - popular and long-running comic strip created in the early 1920s by Jimmy Bancks
GINGER MEGS - legs
GIVE IT A BREAK - stop talking!
GIVE IT A CRACK - give it a try
GIVE A BUM STEER - mislead
GIVE IT A BURL - give it a try
GIVE SOMEONE A SERVE - give them a piece of your mind
GIVE THEM A BURL - give them a good spin (two-up)
GIVE US A HEADS UP - let us know
GIVEN THE BULLET - sacked
GLORY BOX - box in which a young woman gathers items to use after marriage
GO ON A SPREE - go on a drinking binge
GOB - mouth
GOBFUL - abuse
GOB SMACKED - surprise
GOD BOTHERER - religious person
GO DOWN THE GURGLER - go broke
GOD BLESS AMERICA, GOD SAVE THE QUEEN, GOD DEFEND NEW ZEALAND AND THANK CHRIST FOR AUSTRALIA - Russell Crowe
GOES DOWN LIKE A LEAD BALLOON - a failure
GO FOR IT - expression encouragement
GOING OFF– things are busy
GOING OFF AT- telling someone off
GOING TROPPO - going crazy
GOING WALKABOUT - travelling
GOLDEN CASKET LOTTERY - est. c. 1916 to pay for soldier repatriation (QLD)
GOLDEN GUITAR AWARDS - Country music festival awards held annually in Tamworth
GONE WALKABOUT - item that is misplaced or lost
GONE WEST - dead (soldier slang WW1)
GONG - medal (military)
GONNA -going to
GOODIES - treats, usually lollies
GOOD IRON - commendation; from game of quoits throwing the ring over the iron
GOOD-O. Everythings all right
GOOD OIL - reliable information (WW1)
GOOD SPORT - fair person
GOOD ON YA – Good work
GOOG - as full as a goog = drunk
GOOGY-EGG - child's name for a boiled egg
GOOLEY - a stone
GOOLEY - a single bomb dropped from a plane
GOON – flagon of wine
GOOSE - insult describing someone considered foolish
GO ROUND WITH - Go out together, date. 1970s
GOSFORD SKIRT - A very short skirt, so called because the NSW city of Gosford is close to a town called The Entrance.
GO TO BUGGERY - go away; leave me alone
GO THE KNUCKLE - engage in a fist fight with another person
GO UNDER - fail; collapse
GO UP IN SMOKE - fail, collapse; lose
GOVERNMENT MEN - convicts
GO WALKABOUT - Aboriginal - living a nomadic life
GOYDER'S LINE - George Goyder established the margin between reliable and unreliable rainfall regions in South Australia 150 years ago
GRAFTER - a good worker (WW2)
GRANNY FLAT - detached building on your property where your mother or father might live.
GRAPPLING IRONS - spurs (WW1)
GREASING THE SWAG STRAPS - Swagman's language time to move on
GREAT AUSTRALIAN DREAM - a belief that in Australia, home-ownership can lead to a better life and is an expression of success and security.
GREAT SOUTHERN LAND - a single released in1982 by the Australian rock band Icehouse.
GREAT WHITE SHARK - Nick name of golfer Greg Norman
GREEN - inexperienced person
GREEN GROCER - type of cicada
GREENIE - environmentalist
GREEN WHISTLE - temporary analgesic given to trauma patients
GREY NOMAD - retired person who travels Australia usually in a caravan
GRIND THEM INTO THE DUST - Quote - Don Bradman - When you play test cricket, you don't give the Englishmen an inch. Play it tough, all the way. Grind them into the dust
GROG - alcohol
GROG SHOP/ GROG SHANTY - pub or bottle shop
GROMMET - young surfer
GRONK - idiot, lacking in social skills
GROUSE - great
GRUB - food
GRUMBLEBUM - complainer
GRUNDIES - underwear/ undies
GUFF - foolish talk
GUFFED - deceived
GULLY RAKING - stealing unbranded livestock from distant station
GUN - expert shearer
GUN FIRE BREAKFAST - originally British however popular in Australia now as a follow-up to the Anzac Dawn service
GUNYAH - temporary shelter from sheets of bark at NSW goldfields. From Dharuk Aboriginal language
GUTLESS WONDER - a coward
GUYVER - pretence; make believe. Jewish origin

H

HAIRY BELLY - sycophant (soldier slang WW1)
HAIRY EYEBALL - give someone the once over or examine closely
HALF ARSED - job that is half done
HALF YOUR LUCK - wishing for the good fortune of someone else
HALF WAY DECENT - reasonably attractive person
HANGER ON -unwanted person
HANG ON A TICK - wait a moment
HANG OUT FOR - anticipate
HANGRY - hungry and angry at the same timeme
HAPPY AS A DOG WITH TWO TAILS - very happy
HAPPY AS A PIG IN SHIT - very happy
HAPPY AS LARRY - very happy
HAPPY LITTLE VEGEMITE - very happy (advertising jingle)
HARBOUR BRIDGE PASS- in rugby a high looping pass
HARD CASE - an amusing or eccentric person
HARD LINES - bad luck
HARD UP - destitute
HARD YAKKA – Hard work
HARD WORD - put the hard word on = make demands
HARRY CAFE DE WHEELS - iconic trailer cafe at Wooloomooloo, Sydney
HAVE A BLUE; - have a fight
HAVE A CAPTAIN COOK - have a look
HAVE A CRACK - have a go
HAVE A GO YA MUG - try harder
HAVE A GOOD ONE - have a good day
HAVE A NATTER - talk, usually between women
HAVE A SQUIZ - have a look
HAVE A STICKY - pry into the personal affairs of another
HAVEN'T GOT TWO BOB TO RUB TOGETHER - broke
HEAD OVER TURKEY - head over heels
HEAPS – loads, lots, many
HE'S LIKE A SHIVER WAITING FOR A SPINE TO RUN UP - Paul Keating referring to John Hewson
HELL FOR LEATHER - fast
HELLO POSSUMS - Dame Edna Everidge's catch cry
HEN'S NIGHT - bachelorette party
HEXHAM GREYS - large mosquitoes found in Hexham district NSW
HICKORY - Be off. (soldier slang WW1)
HICKS - people who live in the country/bush
HIDEY; - children's game - hide and seek
HIGH AS A KITE - high on drugs
HILL'S HOIST - rotary clothes hoist invented by motor mechanic Lance Hill in 1945 South Australia
HILTON HOTEL BOMBING - An explosion occurred outside the Hilton Hotel in Sydney on 13 February 1978 where a Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting was taking place
HISSY FIT - tantrum
HIT FOR SIX - laid low
HIT THE FROG AND TOAD - hit the road - get out!
HODDLE STREET SHOOTING - In Melbourne on 9 August 1987 a gunman fired a total of 114 rounds in the space of 45 minutes, killing seven people and wounding a further 19, including two police officers
HOLD YOUR HORSES - request for patience
HOLEY DOLLAR - what remained of a Spanish dollar when the centre of the coin (the dump) had been struck out of it. The holey dollar was worth five shillings, and the dump fifteen pence.
HOLEY DOOLEY - expression of surprise
HOLLYWOOD - shanty town at Lambton NSW c. 1930s
HOME AND DRIED - safe and sound (soldier slang WW1)
HOME AND HOSED - safe and sound
HONEY JOYS - children's party food made from cornflakes
HONKER - nose
HOON – lout; also bad and fast driver, usually young
HOOROO - see you later
HOP OUT - a challenge to fight c. 1920
HOP OVER - go over the top to fight (soldier slang WW1)
HORNBAG - Sexually attractive person
HOT AS HADES - a scorcher of a day
HOT UNDER THE COLLAR - angry
HOTTIE - souped up car
HOWARD'S BATTLERS - working class people, traditionally regarded as Labor voters, who were instrumental in electing John Howard’s conservative Coalition to power in 1996
HOW ARE YOU GOING ? - How are you?
HOW WOULD YOU BE? - How are you?
HOW'S THE SERENITY - Darryl Kerrigan in 'The Castle' - how good is this place?
HOWZAT - appeal a decision in cricket
HUMDINGER - remarkable person or thing
HUMIDICRIB - incubator for premature babies
HUMPING BLUEY - carrying a swag
HUMP THE DRUM - also on the Wallaby Track - walk to outback or bush
HUMPY - bush hut
HUNDREDS AND THOUSANDS - coloured sprinkles for cakes
HUNGRY FORTIES - depression of the 1840s
HUNKY DORY - all's well

I

I AM, YOU ARE, WE ARE AUSTRALIAN - popular Australian song written in 1987 by Bruce Woodley of The Seekers and Dobe Newton of The Bushwackers
I BELIEVE YOU BUT THOUSANDS WOULDN'T - calling out a liar
I DEMAND AN APOLOGY, ONE OF YOUR TEAM MATES CALLED ME A BASTARD - Douglas Jardine to Australian Player. Reply: Which one of you bastards called this bastard a bastard? from the movie Bodyline [1984]
IDIOT BOX - television
IF BLOOD SHOULD STAIN THE WATTLE - from Henry Lawson's poem Freedom on the Wallaby
I FEEL LIKE A TOOHEYS – Tooheys advertising slogan
IFFY - questionable; a bit risky
IF YOU ASK ME, I THINK IT'S THE BIGGEST CHAUVINISTIC EXERCISE IN THE WORLD - THAT'S WHY NOBODY ASKS YOU, DARLING - Quote from movie 'The Dish'
I'LL BE A MONKEYS UNCLE - expression of surprise
I'LL GO THE BASTARD - cause physical altercation
ILLYWHACKER - confidence trickster
I LOVE A SUNBURNT COUNTRY, A LAND OF SWEEPING PLAINS - from Dorothea Mackellar's 'My Country'
I'M ALRIGHT JACK -don't worry about me
IMSHEE - begone - take yourself off (soldier slang WW1)
IN A MO - soon
IN A TIZZ - excited
IN GOOD NICK - in good condition
INKED - drunk
INLAND TROUGH - or dry line, is a semi-permanent feature of the synoptic pattern over the interior of Queensland mostly during warmer months
IN LIKE FLYNN - successful (Errol Flynn)
I NEED IT LIKE A HOLE IN THE HEAD - don't need it at all
IN THE BOX - In the Front Line (Army 1945)
IN THE STICKS - in the bush; away from civilization
IODINES - Army Medical corps
I GOT ONLY A FIVER FOR THE SONG, BUT IT'S WORTH A MILLION TO ME TO HEAR IT SUNG LIKE THIS - Banjo Paterson on hearing Waltzing Matilda sung at an army camp at the beginning of WW1
IRON LUNG - wouldn't work in an iron lung - extremely lazy
IRON RATIONS FOR FRITZ - shells for the enemy (soldier slang WW1)
ISLAM AS A COUNTRY - 'I don’t oppose Islam as a country, but I do feel that their laws should not be welcome here in Australia.' Stephanie Banister, a candidate for Pauline Hanson’s One Nation Party 2013
I STILL CALL AUSTRALIA HOME - song written by Peter Allen; later Qantas theme song
IT'S BETTER THAN A SLAP IN THE BELLY WITH A WET FISH - not as bad as it could be
IT'S JUST NOT CRICKET - an unjust or unfair occurrence
IT'S MOMENTS LIKE THESE YOU NEED MINTIES - Advertising slogan 1920s
IT'S EITHER SYDNEY OR THE BUSH - a final choice or decision
IT IS BETTER TO BE DEFEATED ON PRINCIPLE THAN TO WIN ON LIES - Arthur Calwell, politician.
IVORIES - teeth
I WISH YOU WERE A STATUE AND I WERE A PIGEON - by Yabba, heckler at the Sydney Cricket Ground
I WOULDN'T BE DEAD FOR QUIDS - a reply to Howya going?
I WOULDN'T GIVE TUPPENCE - of no value

J

JACK UP - refuse to do something
JACK OF IT - had enough of it
JACKEROO - cattle station worker
JACK OR JACKMAN - lazy digger or one who places himself above others
JACKS - military police WW1
JACK SCRATCH - got a match? (soldier slang WW1)
JACKY HOWE - sleeveless, singlet worn by shearers
JAFFAS - chocolate coated orange lollies first made in 1931
JAFFLE IRON - Device used to make toasted snacks by heating over a fire. First patented in Australia 1849
JATZ CRACKERS - Rhyming slang for knackers; male genitalia
JELLY CAKES - small cakes covered in jelly and rolled in coconut
JERILDERIE LETTER - 56 page document written by bushranger Ned Kelly as a justification of his actions in the year before his death
JIFFY - a brief period of time
JIGGERED - broken
JINDALEE RADAR SYSTEM - developed in 1995 to detect stealth aircraft through monitoring sea and air movements.
JINKER - wood carrier; vehicle
JOB - strike a blow
JOE BLAKE - snake
JOE BLOW - an average sort of bloke
JOES or JOE BLAKES - the blues or delerium tremens (WW2)
JOES - Gold fields - Licence boundaries for mines were strictly enforced, and the approach of the police was signalled by the cry of Joe! Joe! as miners without licences scrambled to escape the grasp of the law. Joe or Charlie Joe were terms of derision for the Lieutenant-Governor Charles Joseph Latrobe
JOEY - young marsupial. Also pinkie
JOEY - a fake (Army 1945)
JOEY or JO JOS - another name for bindi-eyes. Used around Newcastle Hunter Valley
JOURNO; - journalist
JUG - prison
JUICE - petrol
JUMBUCK - sheep
JUST ROCK UP - come whenever

K

KANAKA - labourer from the South Seas
KANGAROO LOOSE IN THE TOP PADDOCK - intellectually challenged
KANGAROO FEATHERS - 1. a tall tale. 2. an impossible thing.
KANGAROO FEATHERS - Emu feather attached to the slouch hat of the light horse men, became a symbol of the light horse, inseparable from its legend. Appreciating a practical joke, when asked about their plumes, First AIF light horsemen pulled many legs by replying that they were, in fact, "kangaroo feathers"(AWM) (WW1)
KANGAROO MILE - a distance longer than an actual mile because of adverse conditions. Coined by David Burn in 1842
KARK IT - die
KEEP THE BASTARDS HONEST - Slogan for the Democrat Party coined by leader Don Chipp—the 'bastards' being the major parties and politicians in general.
KEEP YOUR SHIRT ON - don't get angry
KELPIE - short haired Australian bred dog sometimes with part dingo
KENTUCKY SHOUT - Dutch treat
KERR'S CUR - Gough Whitlam's reference to Malcolm Fraser in 1975
KERO - Kerosene
KIBOSH - prevent from
KICK ARSE - overpower, succeed
KICK IN FOR A PRESSIE - contribute to gift
KICK OFF - to commence
KICK ON - to continue to party
KICK THE BUCKET - die
KIDDING - deceiving
KILLER - the straw that broke the camel's back
KILLING IT - winning, doing well
KIP - take a nap
KNACKERED - very tired
KNICKERS – female underwear
KNOCK - criticise
KNOCK-ABOUT - A man hired on a sheep or cattle station to do odd jobs
KNOCK BACK - refuse something
KNOCK BACK - reversal of fortune
KNOCK BACK A FEW - drink a large amount of alcohol
KNOCKED - wounded (soldier slang WW1)
KNOCK IT OFF - stop doing that
KNOCK OFF - poor copy of an original
KNOCK OFF TIME - time to finish work
KNOCKED UP - pregnant
KNOCK YOURSELF OUT - go ahead and do it
KNUCKLE SANDWICH - punch in the mouth
KNUT - a flash person
KOOKABURRAS - Light Horse men
KOORI - aborigine

L

LAG - old convict
LAKEMAC - Unfortunate nickname applied to Lake Macquarie in recent years
LAMINGTON - chocolate iced cake rolled in coconut invented by Armand Gallad
LAMINGTON DRIVE - fundraising event selling lamingtons
LANCE-JACK - Lance-corporal (Army 1945)
LAND THE MUSTARD - to win money
LARK - joke
LARRIKIN – young man who’s always up for a laugh; prankster
LAUGHING JACKASS - kookaburra
LAYABOUT - lazy unemployed person
LEARNING THE HARD WAY - learning from experience
LEATHER JACKET - dough fried in a pan (pancake). - G. Haydon c. 1846
OI, LEAVE OUR FLIES ALONE, JARDINE. THEY'RE THE ONLY FRIENDS YOU'VE GOT HERE - by Yabba, heckler at the Sydney Cricket Ground
LEERY - a common person
LEFTIE - derogatory term for a person who supports the left side of politics
LEG IT - walk
LEGLESS – Someone who is really drunk
LEMON - something useless or in bad repair; car
LET THE WORD 'AUSTRALIAN' DIGNIFY THE LOWLIST MAN - by poet Arthur Balydon
LID -a hat
LIFE. BE IN IT – Australian Government slogan
LIFE WASN'T MEANT TO BE EASY - Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser quoting George Bernard Shaw
LIGHT HORSE - Australian cavalry
LIGHT ON THE HILL - Australian labour party catch phrase - Ben Chifley
LIKE BILLYO - energetically
LIKE A BLOW FLY IN A PICKLE BOTTLE - agitated
LIKE A RAT UP A RAFTER - very fast
LIKE A RAT UP A DRAINPIPE - very fast
LIKE A SHAG ON A ROCK - stands out; lonely
LIKE A SHIVER WAITING FOR A SPINE TO RUN UP - Paul Keating describing John Hewson
LIKE A TERRIER - Never gives up
LIKE PITT STREET, SYDNEY - busy; lot of traffic
LIMA DECLARATION - Disastrous for Australia, the Lima Declaration called for the redistribution of world industry so that developing countries would have 25% of it by the year 2000. Signed by Whitlam in 1975, ratified by Fraser
LINDT CAFE SEIGE - Hostages taken by Islamic State operative Man Monis on Monday 15 December 2014 at the Lindt Cafe, Sydney
LINGO - Language
LIPPIE - lipstick
LIQUID AMBER - beer
LIQUID LUNCH - beer only for lunch
LITTLE AUSSIE BATTLER - hard working Australian down on his luck
LITTLE AUSSIE BLEEDER - referring to Australian comedian Norman Gunston
LITTLE DIGGER - Billy Hughes, Australia's 7th prime minister
LIVING OFF THE SHEEP'S BACK - referring to Australia's prosperity because of the wool industry
LIVE OFF THE SMELL OF AN OILY RAG - to live frugally
LOADED - with money; rich
LOLLIES – Sweets
LOLLY WATER- fizzy drink
LONDON TO A BRICK - certainty
LOO - toilet
LOOKED LIKED HE'D SWALLOWED A SHEEP - carrying too much weight; obese. - Shane Warne to Sri Lankan Arjuna Ranatunga
LOOK SEE - have a look
LOOSE CANNON - out of control; unpredictable
LOST THE PLOT - lost site of objective
LOUIE THE FLY - Mortein advertisement
LUGS - ears
LUNA PARK - heritage-listed amusement park at Milsons Point, on Sydney Harbour. The park was constructed during 1935
LUNA PARK FIRE - On 9 June 1979 at approximately 10:45pm, six children and one adult were killed when a ghost train amusement ride at Luna Park caught fire
LURK - a scheme for success

M

MABO - The Mabo Case was a significant legal case in Australia that recognised the land rights of the Meriam people, traditional owners of the Murray Islands
MACCAS – McDonalds
MAD AS A CUT SNAKE - angry; crazy
MAD AS A GUM TREE FULL OF GALAHS - crazy
MAD AS A MEAT AXE - crazy
MAD MICK AND BANJO - pick and shovel (soldier slang WW1)
MAFEESH - nothing (soldier slang WW1)
MAGGIE - magpie
MAGIC PUDDING - endless resource
MAINTAIN YOUR RAGE AND ENTHUSIASM FOR THE CAMPAIGN - Gough Whitlam after the dismissal
MAKE A BLUE - make a mistake
MAKE A GALAH OF YOURSELF - behave foolishly
MAKE A QUID - make a living
MAKE A WELTER OF - take advantage of
MAKING TUCKER - making a living (1858)
MANILLA HAT - hat made of imported fibres
MARALINGA - site of British nuclear tests 1956 and 1963. Part of the Woomera Prohibited Area in South Australia
MARCHING KOALAS - The Marching Koalas were formed in 1982 as a band from the Hunter Region of NSW representing local high schools and the community
MATE - term of friendship or greeting
MATELOTS - Sailors
MATE'S RATES - lower price for friends
MATILDA - swag
MAY YOUR CHOOKS TURN INTO EMUS AND KICK YOUR DUNNY DOOR DOWN - a way of wishing someone bad luck
McMANSION - Coined during the urban sprawl of the 90s, when large homes began to dominate the outer suburbs
MELBOURNE CUP - Australia's most famous annual Thoroughbred horse race. Conducted by the Victoria Racing Club on the Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne. The event starts at 3:00 pm on the first Tuesday of November and is known as "the race that stops the nation". First hel in 1861
METHO - methylated spiritsts
MEXICAN - someone from Victoria
MIDDLE OF NOWHERE - in the outback; far away
MIDDY - a measured glass of beer
MILKO - milkman
MILKSHAKE DUCK - to be popular in the media at first but later to lose favour because of questionable behaviour
MINTIES - mint flavoured lolly created in 1922
MISERY GUTS - miserable person
MISSUS - wife
MOB - A way to refer to a group of Aboriginal people who have a connection to one another.
MOB - a lot of cattle
MOCK GOOSE - colonial recipe using butter beans or mutton and other ingredients when unable to afford a goose
MOGGIE - cat
MOLESKINS – trousers of heavy, closely-woven cotton material worn mostly by stockmen
MOLLY DOOKER - left handed person
MONGREL - dispicable person; also flamin' mongrel
MOOLAH - money
MOOMBA - Melbourne Festival
MOOMBA - IT'S AN OLD ABORIGINAL WORD MEANING 'LET'S GET TOGETHER AND HAVE FUN'. THEY GAVE US THE WORD BECAUSE THEY HAD NO FURTHER USE FOR IT. - Barry Humphries
MORE FRONT THAN MARK FOYS - over confidant person
MORE MONEY THAN YOU CAN POKE A STICK AT - a rich person
MORE NUTS THAN THE BRIDGE - person who is a bit crazy - nuts being of the Sydney Harbour bridge
MORGY - something to eat (soldier slang WW1)
MOUTH LIKE THE BOTTOM OF A COCKIE'S CAGE - dry mouth
MOZZIE – Mosquito
MOZZLE - luck
MR. SQUIGGLE - early Australian TV children's program
MUCKING AROUND - joking
MUDDY - mud crab
MUD MAP - map drawn on the ground
MUG - a useless person
MUG'S GAME - unrewarding activity
MUG PUNTERS - amateur gamblers
MULLOCK - waste rock or earch
MULLOCKY - rubbishy, messy
MULLY GRUBBER; - cricket - a ball delivered so that it stays very low after pitching.
MUNCHIES - snack food
MUNGO MAN - discovered in Mungo National Park, New South Wales, lived between 40,000 – 68,000 years ago.
MUSTER - herd livestock

N

NAME IS MUD; - utterly discredited; of no account whatever
NAIPOO - no way (WW1)
NAPOO - almost done with, finished (1918)
NARKED - to be angered or foiled
NARKY - irritable
NASHO - person who underwent compulsory military training
NEENISH TART - small cream pastry with icing on top
NEVER BE AFRAID TO LAUGH AT YOURSELF, AFTER ALL YOU COULD BE MISSING OUT ON THE JOKE OF THE CENTURY - Dame Edna Everidge
NEVER LET THE TRUTH GET IN THE WAY OF A GOOD STORY - embellish a story with a lie
NEVER NEVER - the outback
NEVER NEVER - unrealistic utopian future
NEVER SEE A NEED WITHOUT DOING SOMETHING ABOUT IT - said by Mary MacKillop, Australia's first saint
NEWBIE - new person at work
NEWCASTLE EARTHQUAKE - On 28 December 1989 an earthquake measuring 5.6 on the Richter scale hit Newcastle
NEW CHUM - a young man sent out to Australia to gain some experience of life in the colonies
NICK - steal
NICK OFF - go away
NICKY NU - naked
NIGEL - someone who has no friends
NIGGLE - irritable
NINCOMPOOP -fool
NINE O'CLOCK BREEZE - cooling summer night breeze, Emerald, Central Queensland
NINETY TO THE DOZEN - constant and fast talking
NING NONG - Sometimes abbreviated to nong - someone who has done something stupid or clumsy
NIPPER - young surf life saver
NIT WIT - silly person
NOAH'S ARK - shark
NOAH'S DOVES - reinforcements who were at sea on their way to war zone when armistice was signed (WW1)
NO BUTS ABOUT IT - no dispute
NO DRAMA – No problem / it’s ok
NO FLIES ON - quick witted person
NOGGIN - head
NO HOPER - someone who will never do well; a loser
NONG - a simple person
NORM - initially for a fitness campaign c. 1970's. Depicted an unfit, beer drinking male
NOSH; - food
NOSY PARKER - sticky beak
NOT BACKWARD IN COMING FORWARD - confident, brash person
NOT FOR ALL THE TEA IN CHINA - not at any price
NOT HAPPY JAN - Yellow pages advertisement
NOT IN THE RACE - no hope
NOT ON - not having it; its not going to happen
NOT ON YOUR NELLIE - under no circumstances
NOT PLAYING FOR SHEEP STATIONS - don't take competition so seriously
NOT THE FULL QUID - lacking in intelligence
NOT WHAT IT'S CRACKED UP TO BE - disappointing
NOT WITHIN COOEE - figuratively a long way
NOT WORTH A CRACKER - of no value
NOT WRONG - correct
NO WORRIES -No problem, it’s ok
NO WUCKERS - phrase progression from no worries = no f.ckin' worries = no wuckin' forries = no wuckers - means no problems, it's ok
NUDDY – Naked
NUGGETT - handy name for someone (soldier slang WW1)
NUGGETTY BLOKE- man with a short stocky build
NUKE - microwave
NUMBER CRUNCHER - accountant
NUT OUT - to work out a problem
NUTTY AS A FRUIT CAKE - crazy

O

OARSOME FOURSOME - nickname of Australian Olympic men's rowing crew
OCKER - rough uncultivated man, bogan
OFFSIDER - a bullock-driver’s assistant who walks on the off-side of the team and flogs the bullocks on that side when needed
OFFSIDER - work mate
OFF THE PLANET - taking drugs
OI - used to get someone's attention or to convey annoyance
OI OI OI - Chanted three times after Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, - national sporting cry.
OK BOOMER - eye-roll put-down of Baby Boomer's lecturing of Millenials
OKEY DOKEY - ok
OLD CHEESE - mother
OLD COUNTRY - England
OLD HAND - Ex-convict c. 1860
OLDIES - parents
OLD LAG - ticket of leave holder; ex convict
OLIVER IN TOWN- Oliver used to mean moon. This expression meant it was unfavorable night for burglars
ON A GOOD WICKET - successful
ON A STICKY WICKET - in trouble
ONCE OVER - look over quickly
ON FOR YOUNG AND OLD - full scale fight
ON THE BLINK - broken
ON THE MAKE - looking for profit or conquest
ON THE NOSE - smelly
ON THE NOSE - bad food (Army 1945)
ON THE OUTER - excluded
ON THE RAG - period
ON THE TURPS - drinking heavily, turps being abbreviation of turpentine
ON THE WALLABY TRACK - tramping the outback
ONE ARMED BANDIT - poker machine
ONE FOR THE FATHER, ONE FOR THE MOTHER AND ONE FOR THE COUNTRY - Treasurer Peter Costello on introducing the Baby Bonus in 2002
ONE FOR THE ROAD - the last drink at the pub before you leave
ONE STAR PIP - second lieutenant (soldier slang WW1)
ONYA BIKE - Get on ya bike - tell someone to leave
ON YOUR PAT MALONE - on your own
ONYA - good on you
OPEN SLATHER - free-for-all; no rules
OPERA HOUSE LOTTERY - subsidised the building of the Sydney Opera House
OP SHOP - opportunity shop; second hand goods
OUR VISION IS TO LOOK THROUGH THE EYES OF OUR KIDS. WE ARE A LUCKY, PEACEFUL NATION. WE ARE AN UNSELFISH PEOPLE. THAT'S ONE OF OUR PROUDEST NATIONAL ATTRIBUTES. - General Sir Peter Cosgrove
OUTBACK - interior of Australia; dry, unpopulated
OUTHOUSE - dunny
OUT THE BACK - back yard, nearby
OUT TO IT - dead drunk
OVERPAID, OVERSEXED, AND OVER HERE - phrase thought to have originated in Australia during WWII in regards to American servicemen who arrived in the country shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbour by the Japanese
OVERLAND - across country
OVERLANDER - stockman who herds cattle over great distance
OVERLAND TELEGRAPH LINE - 200 km telegraph line that connected Darwin with Port Augusta in South Australia
OVER THE RIVER - signifying good-bye
OVER THE ROAD - across the street
OZ - Australia

P

PACKING IT - scared
PACK IT IN - give up
PACK OF GALAHS - group of no hopers
PADDLE-POP - icecream on a stick
PADDY MELON - small marsupial similar to wallaby. From the Aboriginal word badimaliyan
PADDY WHACK - spank
PANIC MERCHANT - person who panics easily
PANNIKIN - undersized quart pot
PARALYTIC - drunk
PART UP - to pay
PASH – a long kiss
PASH RASH - red irritated skin because of a lengthy kiss or pash
PASS MUSTER - be approved of
PASS OVER THE GREAT DIVIDE - die
PASS THE BUCK - pass the blame to someone else
PATERSON'S CURSE - noxious weed introduced in 1840s
PATLANDER - early immigrant or convict from Ireland (Sydney Gazette 1832)
PAT MALONE - on your own
PAVLOVA - meringue dessert
PAY OUT - to make fun of
PAY THROUGH THE NOSE - pay too much
PEACOCKED IT - get the best bits
PEARLER - impressive
PEB - a tough; a larrikin; an appreviation of pebble
PEGGED OUT - died
PERKINS PASTE - Glue first made by Maurice Bertram Jeffery c. 1934. Specifically for children many of whom loved the taste!
PERV - looking surreptitiously at the opposite sex
PETROL HEAD - someone who loves cars; drives fast
PICK A BOX - one of the first game shows on Aussie TV. Bob and Dolly Dyer
PICK THE EYES OUT OF IT - get the best bits
PICKLED - drunk
PIECE OF CAKE - easy
PIECE OF PISS - easy
PIG IRON BOB - Refers to Robert Menzies because of a 1938 political industrial dispute at Port Kembla protesting the export of pig iron from Australia to Japan
PIG - F-111 aircraft
PIGS - derogatory term for police
PIG'S ARSE - not true
PIG STICKER - bayonet (WW1)
PIKER - someone who leave a party early
PINKIE - young marsupial - joey
PIPPED AT THE POST - beaten at the last minute
PISS OFF – go away, get lost
PISS UP – a party, a get together and in Australia – most social occasions
PISS WEAK - no strength
PISSED – Intoxicated, Drunk
PISSED OFF – Annoyed
PITT STREET FARMER - Someone who lives in the city but has rural property, possibly as a means of tax avoidance
PLATES OF MEAT - feet (WW2)
PLAY FUNNY BUGGERS - act in a silly or sly way
PLAY SILLY BUGGERS - as above; mucking about
PLAYING POSSUM - pretending to be asleep; keeping quiet
PLAYING FOR SHEEP STATIONS - used ironically to describe something as a big deal
PLAYING WITH FIRE - tempting fate
PLAY LUNCH - morning tea time at school (NSW)
PLEASE EXPLAIN - Said by Pauline Hanson, founder of the anti-immigration One Nation Party, on being asked in October 1996 on the television show 60 Minutes if she was xenophobic.
PLONK - cheap wine from vin blanc - (WW1 origin)
PLONK DOWN - sit down heavily
PLUGGERS - cheap rubber thongs
PODDY DODGER - thief who steals unbranded cattle
POKE BORAK - to insult (WW2)
POKE MULLOCK - to deride, to tease
POKIES - Poker machines
POLLY or POLLIE - Politician
POLLY WAFFLE - Cylindrical shaped chocolate bar created by Melbourne based business Hoadley's Chocolate in 1947
POLONY - luncheon meat; called Devon in NSW; Fritz in S.A.
POMMY - person born in England. Derogatory. Acronym, origin debatable
POMMY SHOWER - not using a shower with water, just using deodorant
PONG - bad smell
POOR BASTARD - expression of sympathy for another's misfortune
POOR FELLOW MY COUNTRY - A novel by Xavier Herbert re wasted opportunities of Australia to build a just and independent country
POOR MAN'S DIGGINGS - land from which gold was mined without substantial capital investment
POPULATE OR PERISH - Catch phrase of Labor Immigration Minister Arthur Calwell as he sought boost population by immigration after WW2
PORK BARRELLING - term used in politics when promises are made for more funding to marginal seats than safe seats
PORKY PIES - lies
PORT - suitcase
PORT ARTHUR MASSACRE - On Sunday 28 April 1996, gunman Martin Bryant used a military style weapon to kill 20 people in the Broad Arrow Cafe at Port Arthur,Tasmania. He then killed a further 15 people within Port Arthur and the nearby region and injured 21 others
POSER - a show off
POSSIE - position (soldier slang WW1)
POSSUM, STIR THE - cause controversy
POSTIE -- postman
POTTY - a bit crazy; eccentric
PRAD - a horse
PRANG - car accident
PREZZIE - gift
PRINCE ALBERTS -socks
PUB TEST - term used to describe the general opinion of everyday Australians about current events and politics
PUGGLE - baby echidna
PULL A SWIFTIE - do something dishonest
PULL SOMEONE'S LEG - play a trick; a joke
PULL THE WOOL OVER SOMEONE'S EYES - deceive someone
PULL YOUR FINGER OUT - hurry up
PULL YOUR HEAD IN - be quiet; leave off even if you are correct
PUNCH A DART - smoke a cigarette
PUNCHING THE BUNDY - Bundy clocks were mechanical. Employees used cards that were punched by the machine to record their working hours
PUNCH ON/ PUNCH UP - a fight
PURE MERINO - first class
PUT A SOCK IN IT - be quiet
PUT HIM DOWN - Paul Keating referring to Andrew Peacock.The Leader of the Opposition is more to be pitied than despised, the poor old thing. The Liberal Party of Australia ought to put him down like a faithful old dog'
PUT THE BOOT IN - attack someone when they are already down
PUT THE HARD WORD ON - make sexual proposition
PUT THE MOCKERS ON - jinx someone; cause them to have bad luck

Q

QANTAS - Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services
QUACK - doctor without qualifications
QUARTER ACRE BLOCK - suburban plot of land. Together with a 3 bedroom bungalow, once part of the Great Australian Dream
QUEENSLANDER HOUSE - Single detached timber high-set house with a corrugated iron roof and a characteristic veranda
QUEUE JUMPER - illegal immigrant
QUID - 1 pound note
QUIET AS A MOUSE - very quiet
QUIET AUSTRALIANS - Prime Minister Scott Morrison credited Quiet Australians for his 2019 election victory

R

RAAFIE – an Air Force person
RABBIT KILLER - quick chop/hit at the nape of neck with side of hand. Used as a term in boxing
RABBITING ON - talking endlessly
RABIT PROOF FENCE - Western Australia. Completed 1907
RACK OFF – go away. Exclamation of dismissal
RACK OFF HAIRY LEGS - go away, leave!
RAFFERTYS RULES - no rules at all
RAGE - party; have a good time
RAINBOWS - soldiers who came out after the war storm was over (soldier slang WW1)
RAINING CATS AND DOGS -heavy rain
RANGA - offensive term for red headed person
RAPT – Very happy
RAT BAG - cheeky, unpredictable person
RATS OF TOBRUK - Australian soldiers who held the Libyan port of Tobruk against the Afrika Corps, during and after the Siege of Tobruk in World War II
RAW PRAWN, DON'T COME THE - don't try to fool
RAZOO - non existing coin
RAZOR GANG - violent criminal gang in Sydney
RAZOR GANG - government committee to reduce spending
RECKON – believe
REG GRUNDIES - undies
REINSTOUSHMENTS - Reinforcements (WW1)
RELLIE – Relatives
REMEMBRANCE DAY - Observed on 11 November to recall the end of hostilities of First World War on that date in 1918.
REMITTANCE MAN - shady Englishman usually of good family sent out to Australia and paid an allowance by his family so long as he remains
RIDGIE DIDGE - true
RIGHT HANDER - strike across the face with an open right hand
RIGHTO - OK
RING - call or phone
RINGER - fastest shearer in the shed
RING IN - substitute
RIP OFF - item that costs more than it should
RIPPER– excellent
RIPSNORTER - excellent
ROAD TRAIN - truck used in rural Australia. Prime mover plus two or more trailers
ROCK HOPPER - fisherman on coastal rocks
ROCK LOBSTER - crayfish
ROCK UP - turn up unannounced
ROCKS PUSH - Also The Push. Larrikin gang in Sydney in 1890's
ROLL UP - gather for a meeting (goldfields)
ROLL YOUR OWN - making your own cigarette
ROLLED GOLD - genuine or first class
ROO - kangaroo
ROONED - ruined. 'We'll all be rooned said Hanrahan', quote from iconic poem Said Hanrahan
ROOT - sex
ROOT FOR - barrack for a team
ROOTED – tired
ROOTY - a route march (soldier slang WW1)
RORT - scam
ROSES RED - bed
ROSEMARY - Rosemary is an emblem of remembrance. It is traditional on Anzac Day to wear a sprig of rosemary pinned to a coat lapel
ROUGH AS BAGS - a tough guy
ROUGH AS GUTS - vulgar; uncouth
ROUGH END OF THE PINEAPPLE - raw deal
ROUGH END OF THE STICK - bad side of a deal
ROUGH NUT - unsopisticated person
ROULETTES - Royal Australian Air Force's aerobatic display team established in 1970
ROUSEABOUT - odd job man on station esp. shearing time
RUBBADEDUB - a pub or bar (WW2)
RUBBER DUCKY - Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) introduced into Australia in the 1970s
RUG UP - dress warmly
RUG RAT - child
RUM REBELLION - an uprising on 26 January 1808 in which William Bligh Governor of New South Wales was deposed by members of the New South Wales Corps
RUN AROUND LIKE A CHOOK WITH ITS HEAD CHOPPED OFF - race around getting nowhere
RUN LIKE A HAIRY GOAT - perform badly in race
RUNNERS – trainers, sneakers
RUN RINGS AROUND - defeat another by physical prowess or intelligence
RUST BUCKET - old car
RYBUCK (RIBUCK) - correct or genuine. Jewish origin
RYBUCK SHEARER - expert shearer

S

SALTIE - saltwater crocodilele
SALVOS - Salvation Army personnel
SAN FERRY ANN - It doesn't matter c 1920s
SAND GROPER - person from Western Australia
SANDY BERET - Worn by qualified members of the Australian Special Air Service Regiment. Sand-coloured beret with metal gold and silver winged dagger badge on a black shield
SANDY BLIGHT - eye complaint
SANDSHOES - sneakers; tennis shoes
SANFAIRYANN - almost finished, but it does not matter (1918)
SANGER or SANGA - sandwich
SAO -charity biscuit - it used to be handed out by Salvation Army Officers
SARVO - this afternoon
SASR - The Special Air Service Regiment is a special forces unit of the Australian Army. Formed in 1957, motto 'Who Dares Wins'
SAUSAGE SIZZLE - community event where BBQ sausage and sauce are served wrapped in bread. Often fund raisers eg Bunnings sausage sizzle
SAV - short for Saveloy, a hot dog-like boiled sausage served in a bread roll with tomato sauce. A 'battered sav' is a battered saveloy which has been battered, deep fried and served with tomato sauce
SAVEE - Do you Know? (soldier slang WW1)
SAY IT DON'T SPRAY IT - WE WANT THE NEWS NOT THE WEATHER - dont spit when talking
SCAB - abusive term; non union worker
SCARED THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS OUT OF - frightened someone
SCHNITTY - chicken schnitzel bought from a pub
SCHOOLIES - week after year 12 finish school spent partying
SCHOOL OF THE AIR - School lessons by radio for outback children
SCORCHER - very hot day
SCROUNGE - pilfer ( soldier slang WW1)
SCRUBBER - promiscuous woman
SECRET BALLOT - Also known as Australian ballot - when a voter's choices in an election or a referendum are anonymous, forestalling attempts to influence the voter by intimidation, blackmailing, and potential vote buying. First implemented in 1856
SEE A MAN ABOUT A DOG - go to the toilet
SELECTOR - farmer who is was allowed to occupy a small portion of a squatter's holding and farm it
SEPPO - American - From septic tank (rhyming slang for Yank)
SERVO – Service Station / Garage
SETTLE PETAL - relax, chill out. Don't get so upset
SHADES - Sun glasses
SHAG - to have sex
SHAG ON A ROCK - lonely; isolated
SHAGGIN' WAGON - panel van
SHAKE IT - wishes to acquire (soldier slang WW1)
SHANDY - mixture of lemonade and beer
SHANGHAI - catapult made from fork of a branch and rubber strap
SHANK'S PONY - on foot
SHANTY - a rough bush house
SHARK BAIT -person swimming out further than others
SHARP AS A TACK - smart person
SHARPIES - youth group c. 1960's. Alternative to hippies
SHAZZA - Sharon
SHEARER'S STRIKE - In 1891 the Shearers Strike occurred in Queensland and a State of Emergency was declared. The Moreton Mounted Infantry was called-out to re-establish and maintain civil order and discipline. They were placed on full time duty for five months and served in the Barcaldine, Clermont, Longreach and Charleville districts
SHE ASKED ME WHAT TYPE OF CONTRACEPTIVE I USE. UNDERWEAR. KEEPING IT ON PREVENTS PREGNANCY. - Melina Marchetta, quote from movie Looking for Alibrandi
SHEILA – A woman
SHE'LL BE APPLES - all will be ok
SHE'LL BE RIGHT - In the face of adversity, everything will be ok
SHEMOZZLE - mixed up mess
SHE'S CACTUS - broken
SHE'S RIGHT MATE - everything is alright
SHICER - barren mine. Yiddish. Gold rush days
SHICKERED - drunk. Jewish origin
SHINDIG - party
SHIRALEE- swag
SHIRT-FRONTING - confront an opponent eg football. Brought back in use by Tony Abbott - ' Look, I’m going to shirt-front Mr. Putin … You bet I am'
SHIRTY - irritated and annoyed
SHIT HAPPENS - dismissive of misfortune
SHITHOUSE - something that is bad
SHIVOO - a party
SHONKY - of poor quality
SHOE-IN - certain to win, horseracing
SHONKY - of dubious quality
SHORTY - a tall person
SHOOTING STICK - rifle (soldier slang WW 1)
SHOOT STRAIGHT YOU BASTARDS. DON'T MAKE A MESS OF IT - reported to be the last words of Harry (Breaker) Morant - executed soldier and poet (Boer War)
SHOOT THROUGH – To leave
SHOOT THROUGH LIKE A BONDI TRAM - leave in haste
SHOTGUN - Claiming the front passenger seat (from stage coach days)
SHOUT - buy a drink for others in a pub
SHOW - party
SHOW PONY person who shows off
SHOW THE ROPES - show how things are done
SHUT YOUR FACE - impolite way of saying stop talking
SHYPOO - a sly grog shop
SICK AS A DOG - very sick
SICKIE – or ‘pull a sickie’- take a day off when you aren’t actually sick
SILENT COP - yellow metal or concrete dome used at intersections
SILLY AS A TWO BOB WATCH - act silly
SILLY GALLAH - foolish person
SILLY SAUSAGE - silly person
SILVER BODGIE - Bob Hawke called by the media because of his silver hair worn in the bodgie style
SILVERTAIL - insult invoking the class divide. Used to describe someone who is privileged or socially prominent
SINK THE BOOT IN - attack someone who is down
SIX BOB A DAY TOURISTS - in reference to daily wage for soldiers in WW1 of six shillings per day
SIX OF ONE, HALF DOZEN OF THE OTHER - whatever decision you make will not likely affect the outcome of the situation
SKEDADDLE - go away; leave
SKERRICK - the smallest bit
SKEWIFF - askew
SKINNY AS A RAKE - looking too thin
SKINT - no money
SKIPPY THE BUSH KANGAROO - Children's TV program 1968
SKITE - boast
SKITTLED - killed (soldier slang WW1)
SKULL – To down a beer
SKY THE RAG - give in; throw a towell into the air in token of surrender
SLAB – A carton of beers
SLACK - lazy
SLAG - promiscuous woman
SLAP UP - good
SLEDGE - to needle a player - on the cricket field etc
SLEEP OUT - verandah used as sleeping quarters
SLEPT LIKE A LOG - had a sound sleep
SLICK - quick
SLIDE NIGHT - evening when family or friends gathered to watch projected slides and movies of holidays and other events - 1950s and 1960s
SLING OFF AT - to jeer and mock another
SLING SHOT - catapult. Also called shanghai
SLIP SLOP SLAP - Cancer Council slogan
SLIPPERY AS AN EEL - sly character
SLOSHED - drunk
SLOUCH HAT - first worn by military forces in Australia in 1885. Looped up on one side so that rifles could be held at the slope without damaging the brim
SLOW AS A WET WEEK - too slow
SLY GROG - illegal alcohol
SMART ALEC - someone who thinks they know everything
SMART ARSE - some who thinks they know everything
SMASHED AVO - toast topped with mashed avocado served in cafes
SMOKES LIKE A CHIMNEY - heavy smoker
SMOKO - morning/ afternoon tea break
SMOOGE - to cringe; to fawn. Jewish origin
SMOOGER - one who fawns
SNAFFLE - take it up quickly; steal, grab or borrow
SNAG – Sausage
SNAGGER - a shearer who rushes, shearing a sheep roughly
SNAKE JUICE - strong drink
SNAKE-HEADED - quarrelsome in his cups
SNAKY - hostile, sly, angry comment or behaviour
SNARLER - dishonorable discharge (Army 1945)
SNAVVLE / SNAFFLE - take by stealth, capture, steal
SNINNY - young unmarried woman, a babe (WW2)
SNORKER - sausage (WW2)
SNOWED UNDER - having a lot of work to do
SNOWY MOUNTAINS SCHEME - hydro electricity and irrigation development begun in Ben Chiefley Government 1949
SNUFF - to die
SO HUNGRY COULD EAT A HORSE AND CHASE THE RIDER - Very hungry
SOLAR PLEXUS - William Lawless, Australian Boxing doyen and supporter of boxer Les Darcy
SO LONG - signifying good-bye
SONG AND DANCE - make a noise or fuss about something
SOOK - coward or timid person
SOOKY LA LA - Someone who whinges about things in a childish way
SOOL - to incite; time for a player or jockey or boxer to put forth his utmost effort to win
SOS - Member of the Signal Corp (military)
SOUTHERLY BUSTER - cool wind change after a hot day. NSW
SOUTHERN CROSS FLAG - Has a dark blue field with a central white symmetric cross consisting five eight-pointed stars, representing the Crux constellation. The design was first used in the Eureka Rebellion of 1854.
SO WINDY IT WILL BLOW A DROVER'S DOG OFF THE CHAIN - very windy
SOZZLED - drunk
SPAG BOG - spaghetti bolognaise
SPARKIE - electrician
SPARK WELL - be in good health (1918)
SPEEDO - speedometer on car
SPEEDOS - swimmers developed in 1928
SPEND A PENNY - go to the toilet - (female)
SPEWIN' - angry; disappointed
SPIFLICATE - hurt or punish someone
SPILL - deliberately create a vacancy in cabinet or political party
SPILL YOUR GUTS - tell all
SPIN A YARN - tell a tall story
SPIT THE DUMMY - tantrum
SPITTING CHIPS - angry, frustrated
SPLAYD - eating utensil that combines a spoon, fork and knife in one, invented in Sydney by William McArthur 1940's
SPONGER - a bludger
SPORT - slightly agressive term for someone disliked
SPOT ON - exact, true
SPRING HEEL - a man who on joining a fighting unit immediately finds a means of leaving it (WW1)
SPUD - potato
SPUD BARBER - man on kitchen fatigue (soldier slang WW2)
SPUNK - sexually attractive person
SPUNKRAT - sexually attractive person of opposite sex usually male
SPUNKY - full of spirit
SPRAG - to accost truculently
SPREAD - food on table
SPROGG - offspring
SPRUIK - deliver a long harangue about nothing in particular
SQUARE UP - settle accounts
SQUATTER - person who occupies uninhabited land or building
SQUEALERS - Provost Corps (military)
SQUIZ - have a look
STACK HAT - also crash hat - bicycle helmet
STAGER - one who fakes an injury or shows off (from Australian Rules football)
STAND A HAND - shout a drink c. 1892
STANDOVER MAN - extortionist
STARKERS- naked
STEADY ON - slow down
STEP THE GUTTER - pass the butter (soldier slang WW1)
STEW - a framed case (Army 1945)
STICK AROUND - wait around
STICK BY - support a person
STICK OUT LIKE A SHAG ON A ROCK - stand out; lonely
STICKY BEAK - nosy person
STIFF - too bad!
STILL KICKING - still alive
STINKER - very hot day
STINKING HOT - unbearable heat
STIR THE POSSUM - excite interest; liven things up
STOKED – Happy, Pleased
STOLEN GENERATION - referring to aboriginal children taken from their families
STONE THE CROWS - expression of amazement
STONEY BROKE - having no money
STONKER - exterminate, kill, strike out
STONKERED - very drunk or knocked out
STOP FAFFING AROUND - don't waste time
STOP MUCKING AROUND - stop wasting time
STOP WORRYING, NOBODY GETS OUT OF THIS WORLD ALIVE - Clive James
STOUCH - fight
STRAIGHT UP AND DOWN - honest person
STRAPPED FOR CASH - short of money
STRAW HAT PUSH - larrikin gang prevalent in Sydney 1870s - 1890s
STRAYA – Australia
STRETCH - name for a tall person
STREWTH - God's truth - mild oath expressing surprise
STRIDES - trousers
STRIFE - trouble
STRIKE A LIGHT exclamation of disappointment
STRINE - Australian Slang
STINGER - jellyfish
STRINGERS - gold digger slang - now and then a good payable prospect which induces men to raise a paddock of dirt when washed has little value
STRINGY-BARKER - small farmer
STRAIGHT TO THE POOL ROOM - something highly valued. From movie The Castle
STRIKE ME LUCKY - exclamation of astonishment
STUBBIES - men's shorts 1970's
STUBBY – a bottle of beer
STUBBY HOLDER – polystyrene insulated holder to keep beer cold
STUFFED – Tired
STUFF IT - exclamation of defeat
STUFF UP - blunder, failure
STUMPED - confused
STUMP JUMP PLOUGH - Invented by Richard and Clarence Bowyer Smith 1876. Allowed the plough to jump over stumps so the undercarriage was not damaged
STUMP ORATOR - or On the Stump. A politician who will speak from any available soapbox about any issue that comes up. Also used in America and UK
STUNNED MULLET - shocked look
SUCH IS LIFE - expression or resignation to life's misfortunes
SUCKED IN - tricked
SUCK UP TO - ingratiate oneself
SUGAR BABY - Militia man. No overseas service. c. 1940s
SUNBURNT COUNTRY - from Dorothea Mackellar's poem ‘My Country’
SUNDOWNER - itinerant worker/ swagman who often appeared at stations at sunset in search of work
SUNNIES– Sunglasses
SURFER'S - shorter version of Surfer's Paradise on the Gold Coast
SUSS - Suspicious
SUSS IT OUT - To figure out a tricky situation
SWAG – Single bed you can roll up, a bit like a sleeping bag.
SWAMPED BY ASIANS - prescient term used by Paul Hanson in maiden speech to parliament
SWEAT, DUST AND BEER..THERE'S NOTHING ELSE OUT HERE MATE! - quote from Ted Kotcheff's 1971 film Wake in Fright
SWEET - very good; satisfactory
SWEET AS - awesome
SWEET BUGGER ALL - nothing
SWIG - drink
SWING THE BANJO - to dig (soldier slang WW1)
SYDNEY DUCKS - also Sydney Coves. Thugs, scoundrels, thieves, ex convicts etc who headed to San Francisco during the Gold Rush where they set up nefarious grog shops and lodging houses
SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE - performing arts complex on situated at Benelong Point, Sydney Harbour
SYDNEY OR THE BUSH - All or nothing. In two-up to risk all on the toss of a coin
SYDNEY TO HOBART YACHT RACE - held on Boxing Day. Starts in Sydney and finishes in Hobart

T

TA - Thanks
TAB - betting agency
TAKE TO THE BUSH - become a bushranger
TAKE A TUMBLE - to understand, comprehend
TAILORS - machine made cigarettes
TALK UNDER WATER WITH A MOUTHFUL OF MARBLES - Very talkative
TALL POPPY SYNDROME - when successful, high achieving people are resented and critized in an attempt to 'cut them down to the size' of everyone else
TASMAN BRIDGE COLLAPSE - Part of the Tasman bridge that crossed the Derwent River at Hobart collapsed after the Lake Illawarra, bulk carrier ran into it on 5 January 1975
TASMANIAN TIGER - (thylacine) large carnivorous marsupial now extinct
TAR BOY - in a shearing shed, a boy who had the job of dabbing antiseptic Stockholm Tar on cuts on sheep
TALL POPPY - A conspicuously successful person. Jealous Australians often like to cut tall poppies down to size by denigrating them.
TART - promiscuous woman
TASSIE - Tasmania TEA – supper
TECHNICOLOR YAWN - vomiting
TEE-UP - make arrangement
TELL HIM HE'S DREAMING - unrealistic expectations
TELL YOUR STORY WALKING - Whatever you have to say, say it while you are leaving.
TEN POUND POMS - British citizens who migrated to Australia after WW2 under the Assisted Passage Migration Scheme
TENTERFIELD ORATION - speech given by Sir Henry Parkes, Premier of New South Wales at the Tenterfield School of Arts in 1889 when he called for the Federation of the Australian colonies
TERRA NULLIUS - A concept in international law meaning 'a territory belonging to no-one' or 'over which no-one claims ownership'.
THAT'S BULLSHIT. YOU JUST BULLSHITTED NASA - Quote from movie 'The Dish'Ross 'Mitch' Mitchell
THAT'S NOT A KNIFE - THAT'S A KNIFE - Crocodile Dundee
THAT'S THE SHOT - expression of encouragement or approval
THAT'S THE WAY THE COOKIE CRUMBLES - the way things are
THE ALICE - Alice Springs, Northern Territory
THE ASHES - The Ashes is a cricket competition played between Australia and England since 1882
THE BASTARD FROM THE BUSH - an anonymously-authored bawdy rhyme c. 1900s
THE BATTLE OF LONG TAN - the most recognised Australian battle of the Vietnam War. 18 men killed 24 wounded
THE BEST WAY TO HELP THE POOR IS NOT BECOME ONE OF THEM - Lang Hancock
THE BIG AUSTRALIAN - The Broken Hill Proprietary Company Limited (BHP)
THE BLACK LINE - 1830 - settler force attempted to corral Aboriginal people on the Tasman Peninsula
THE CROCODILE HUNTER - Steve Irwin
THE DISMISSAL - Refers to events on 11 November 1975 when the Prime Minister, Gough Whitlam of the Australian Labor Party (ALP), was dismissed by Governor-General Sir John Kerr, who then commissioned the Leader of the Opposition, Malcolm Fraser of the Liberal Party, as caretaker Prime Minister.
THE DREAMING - A western term used to describe the Aboriginal spirituality system.
THE FORGOTTEN PEOPLE - The middle class - Robert Menzies
THE GHAN - Train travelling from Darwin to Adelaide. Named for Afghan cameleers
THE GONG - Wollongong
THE GREATEST INHERITANCE THAT A MAN HATH IS THE LIBERTY OF HIS PERSON, FOR ALL OTHERS ARE ACCESSORY TO IT - Edward Weary Dunlop
THE HILLBILLY DICTATOR - Joh Bjelke-Petersen
THE LITHGOW FLASH - Marjorie Jackson defeated reigning Olympic 100 and 200 metres champion Fanny Blankers-Koen a number of times in 1949, thus earning this nickname
THE LONG PADDOCK - an historic web of tracks linking stock-breeding areas of inland NSW and Queensland etc
THE LUCKY COUNTRY - coined by Donald Horne with intent to portray Australia's climb to power and wealth as based almost entirely on luck rather than strength of political or economic system. 'Australia is a lucky country run mainly by second rate people who share its luck'. Has come to have a different meaning over the years.
THE MAITLAND WONDER - Boxer Les Darcy
THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER - poem by Banjo Paterson written in 1890
THE ODE - Part of a poem of remembrance by Laurence Binyon always used to commemorate Anzac Day - They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old; Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning we will remember them.
THE PAST IS SO RELIABLE, SO DELIGHTFUL AND THE BEST PLACE TO LIVE - Barry Humphries
THE PUSH - a band of larrikins
THE RACE THAT STOPS A NATION - The Melbourne Cup
THE RECESSION THAT AUSTRALIA HAD TO HAVE - said by Paul Keating during economic crisis in 1990
THE ROARING DAYS - Bush verse about the gold rush days by Henry Lawson
THE SENATE - The upper house of the Parliament of Australia
THE SYDNEY PUSH - The Sydney Push was a predominantly left-wing intellectual subculture in Sydney from the late 1940s to the early 1970s.
THE STORE - The Store, also known as the Newcastle and District Co-operative Society.
THE TOP END - northern most part of Australia
THIEVING IRONS - hands (WW1)
THERE IS WATER IN EVERY LANE, SO IT IS OK. Quote - Ian Thorpe on drawing lane five for the final.
THERE'S MOVEMENT AT THE STATION - first line Banjo Paterson's from the Man from Snowy River - now sometimes used to signify beginning of change
THEY'RE A WEIRD MOB - A 1966 Australian film based on the novel of the same name by John O'Grady under the pen name 'Nino Culotta'
THE STRAIGHT GRIFFIN - the truth; secret reliable information
THE UNDERTAKER - nickname for Paul Keating
THINGAMAJIG - a thing
THIS IS SCIENCE'S CHANCE TO BE DARING - Quote from movie 'The Dish'
TINNY – Can of beer or small boat
THICK AS A BRICK - dull; slow witted
THICK AS TWO PLANKS - dull; slow witted
THINGS ARE CROOK IN TALLAROOK - used to indicate that things are bad or unpleasant.
THIS IS GOING STRAIGHT TO THE POOL ROOM - Darryl Kerrigan in the movie 'The Castle';
THIS IS HALLOWED GROUND, FOR HERE LIE THOSE WHO DIED FOR THEIR COUNTRY. AT THE GOING DOWN OF THE SUN, AND IN THE MORNING, WE WILL REMEMBER THEM - General Sir John Monash - Inscription on the Rats of Tobruk memorial
THONGS – Flip Flops.
THORPEDO - nick name of Olympic swimmer Ian Thorpe
THREE SHEETS TO THE WIND - close to being drunk
THUNDER BOX - toilet
TICK - debt
TICKETS ON YOURSELF - to have a high opinion of oneself
TICKEY - threepenny piece (1913)
TICKLE THE TILL - rob someone
TICKLED PINK - very pleased
TICKLER - difficult to understand; puzzle
TIGHT ARSE - stingy person
TIN - medal (military)
TIN DISH - signifying good-bye
TIN HAT - steel helmet (soldier slang WW1)
TIN LIDS rhyming slang for kids
TINNED DOG - canned meat (goldfields)
TINNIE (TINNY) - can of beer
TINNIE (TINNY) - small aluminium boat
TINNY - Luck in gambling and competitions (WW1?) see Trove
TINTOOKIES - Australian children’s theatre puppet show 1950s
TIP - garbage dump
TIP TURKEY - also Bin Chicken - Ibis (bird) considered a pest in Australia because of scavenging
TO BANDICOOT - to fossick or to dig under a plant without disturbing the top (goldfields term)
TO BE DIRTY ON - to be very angry with
TO CLOCK - to strike with the fist
TOEY - nervous
TOE RAGGER - short sentence man
TOGS - swimsuit, swimmers, bathers
TO HAVE WHITE ANTS (Qld) - wrong in the head
TO LOB - arrive unexpectedly at someone's place
TOM THUMB - tiny open boat used by Matthew Flinders to explore the coast line around Sydney in 1796
TOOL - idiot, male
TOORAK TRACTOR - city-based 4WD or SUV that never sees off road driving
TOO RIGHT - agreeing
TOOTSY - foot; toe
TOP BLOKE - a good guy
TOP END - Northern Territory
TO PUT THE BITE ON - to borrow
TO PUT THE POT ON - to settle an enemy (c. 1920)
TO RAG - to tease
TO RAT -method of removing property from those no long able to use it (WW2)
TO RUBBISH SOMEONE - to insult them
TO SLING OFF - make uncomplimentary remark
TOSSER - a jerk
TOSS IN THE ALLEY - give up the ghost; die
TO WEAR - to be on the receiving end of misfortune
TRACKIE DAKS - tracksuit pants
TRADITIONALLY, AUSTRALIA OBTAINS ITS IMPORTS FROM OVERSEAS - Kep Enderby, Australian Politician
TRANNIE - portable transister radio
TRAP - police officer or trooper
TREACLE MINER - a man who boasts of his wealth
TREE HUGGER - environmentalist
TRIM - ship's cat who accompanied Matthew Flinders on his voyages to circumnavigate and map the coastline of Australia in 1801–03
TROUBLE AND STRIFE - the wife
TRUE BELIEVERS - stalwart Labour Party supporters
TRUE BLUE - patriotic ; genuine Australian
TUCKER – Food
TUCK-SHOP ARMS - flabby upper arms on women
TUG - a rogue; rough uncouth fellow
TURFED OUT - asked to vacate building
TURKEY - ineffectual person
TURN IT ON - provide beer at a party
TURN IT UP - expression of disbelief in what another is saying
TURON WIDOW - Woman left without her husband because he was at the goldfields
TWO UP – A gambling game played on Anzac day.
TWO BOB EACH WAY - hedge your bets; be uncommitted
TWO BOB'S WORTH - an opinion
TWO DADS - a person with a hyphenated surname (military)
TWO MICKS - Two tails (two-up)
TWOPENNY BUNGER - large firecracker
TWO POT SCREAMER - someone who can't hold their drink

U

UGG BOOTS - sheep skin lined boots
U-IE – to take a U-Turn when driving
ULURU - or Ayers Rock. Spectacular landmark in N.T. that stands 348 m above sea level. Sacred to the Aboriginal people of the area
UNDERGROUND MUTTON - rabbit
UNDER THE WEATHER - hungover
UNREAL - fantastic
UNREPRESENTATIVE SWILL - Paul Keating's description of the Senate
UP AGAINST IT - foiled, nullified, thwarted (1913)
UP HIM - to have a fight
UP SHIT CREEK - in trouble
UP THE CREEK WITHOUT A PADDLE - in trouble
UP THE DUFF - pregnant
UP THE SPOUT - gone; finished
UP THERE CAZALY - encouragement call
UP TO MUD - worthless, useless, no good
UP TO PUSSY'S BOW - couldn't eat anything more
UP TO PUTTY - no good (soldier slang WW1)
UP YOU - brush off towards another with different views
UP YOURSELF - person who has high opinion of themselves
USEFUL AS - completely useless
UTE - Utility car - designed in 1934 by Lewis Bandt at Ford in Geelong

V

VAN DIEMEN'S LAND - Name used for Tasmania until 1856
VEE DUB - volkswagon car
VEGANESE - Terminology sprouted by vegans to describe their moral superiority
VEGGIES - vegetables
VEGEMITE - Australian savoury spread made from yeast extract. Invented in 1923 by Dr. Cyril P Callister a leading food technologist
VEGEMITES - Aussie children
VERBAL DIARRHOEA - non stop talk
VICTA - rotary lawn mower. Invented by Mervyn Victor Richardson in 1952
VILLAGE BIKE - promiscuous woman
VOLLEYS - sandshoes
VON BLINKED - drunk (vin blanc corruption WW1)

W

WACKO - exclamation expressing anticipation, approval or delight
WACKO THE DIDDLIO - exclamation of pleasure, esp on seeing attractive woman (WW2)
WAFFLE - talk at length
WAFFLE BURGER - fried savoury takaway food made at Coolangatta 1960s
WAGGING - plaing truant from school
WALKABOUT - indigenous journey; rite of passage
WALK TO BOURKE BACKWARDS - Bob Katter re the gay population in North Qld.
WALLABY BRIGADE - Poem published 1894 about the army of itinerant workers who tramped the bush of Australia between the gold rush years of the 1850's and the First World War
WALLY - forgetful person
WALTZING MATILDA - carrying a swag
WANDERING JEW - Stew (soldier slang WW1)
WANKER - contemptible person
WATCH IT SPORT - threat
WATERING HOLE - pub
WATTLE AND DAUB - early Australian hut made from a woven lattice of wattle branches which has been is daubed with wet clay, sand or straw
WATTLE DAY - Now held annually on 1st September. First proposed in 1909 by Mr. J.H. Maiden, Mrs. Clunies-Ross and Mrs. Kettlewell with a view to stimulating Australian national sentiment and connecting it with love of the beautiful native flora
WE ARE ON THE CREST OF A SLUMP - Gold Coast rugby league coach Phil Economidis after a rough trot.
WE KNEW YOU WOULD FIGHT WELL; WE EXPECTED YOU TO FIGHT WELL; BUT WE DID NOT EXPECT YOU TO ASTONISH THE WORLD - address by French Premier M. Georges Clemenceau thanking Australian troops at the end of WW1
WELCOME TO COUNTRY - acknowledgment of traditional custodianship of the land at the commencement of functions, meetings and presentations of government departments and various organisations
WELL MAY WE SAY 'GOD SAVE THE QUEEN', BECAUSE NOTHING WILL SAVE THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL - Gough Whitlam in 1975 at the dismissal
WELLIES - wellington boots
WE'LL ALL BE ROONED SAID HANRAHAN - a dismissive response to predictions of disasters or hard times from poem 'Said Hanrahan' by bush poet John O'Brien
WERE YOU BORN IN A TENT? - Shut the door!
WE'RE WINNIN' - when tucker is plentiful (Soldier slang WW1)
WET AS WATER - ineffective
WHACKLING OUT - thinking deeply about something (1918)
WHAT DO YOU DO FOR A CRUST? - what do you do for a living?
WHAT DO YOU THINK THIS IS? BUSH WEEK? exclamation when someone does something wrong
WHAT'S THE DAMAGE? - how much is owed?
WHAT'S YOUR POISON? What would you like to drink
WHEN I STAND UP IN PARLIAMENT, THE LABOUR BENCHES WHISTLE - Scott Morrison's thoughts on what the ALP thinks of him
WHEN YOU LEFT THE LODGE, DID YOU GET YOUR BOND BACK? - Norman Gunston to John Gorton
WHERE THE BLOODY HELL ARE YOU? -advertising campaign launched by Tourism Australia in 2006
WHERE THE BULL FEEDS - grass (c. 1920s)
WHINGEING POM - An immigrant from England who moans about trifling inconveniences in Australia and constantly compares them to the equivalent 'back home'
WHIPPERSNAPPER - a child
WHIP THE CAT - cry over spilt milk
WHISKEY AU GO GO - The Whisky Au Go-Go nightclub in Fortitude Valley, Queensland, caught fire after two drums of fuel were set alight on 8 March 1973 Fifteen patrons died from asphyxiation
WHITE ANT - cut in on another's property by subterfuge
WHITE AUSTRALIA POLICY - a set of historical policies in 1901 that aimed to forbid people of non-European ethnic origin from immigrating to Australia
WHITE SHOE BRIGADE - (Qld 1980s) wealthy business people and property developers; politically conservative
WHIZZ BANG - German shell (WW1)
WHOLE SHEBANG - ALL
WHO LET FLUFFY OFF THE CHAIN - who farted?
WHOOPDY DO - big deal; sarcastic
WHOPPER - a lie
WHY IS IT SO? - Professor Sumner Miller catch phrase
WIDOW MAKER - tree, deadwood falling branch from eucalyptus gum tree
WIDE BROWN LAND - from Dorothea Mackellar's poem ‘My Country’
WIDGIES AND BODGIES - youth subculture in the 1950s
WIFE BEATER - blue singlet worn by men (American origin?)
WIGWAM FOR A GOOSE'S BRIDLE (going to get) - dismissive reply to an unwanted query
WILLIES - a feeling of disquiet
WILLY-WILLY - small whirlwind; also called cock-eyed bob or dust-devil
WINDBAG - a talker out of his turn (soldier slang WW1)
WINGED KEEL - Wing at the base of sailing boat keel. Invented by Ben Lexcen. First used in 1983 America’s Cup on Australia II.
WINTER WILL GROW DARK AND COLD / BEFOR THE WATTLE TURNS TO GOLD - from a poem by James McAuley
WITCHETTY GRUB - large, white, wood-eating larvae of moths. Bush tucker
WITHIN COOEE - Within ear shot
WOBBLER - soldier toadying for stripes (WW2)
WOG - a flu or virus. WOG - derogatory term for new migrants 1960s and 1970s
WOMBAT TRAIL - election campaign trail by leaders of the National Party
WON'T HAVE A BAR OF - refuses to take part
WOODBINE - English soldier ( WW1)
WOOLOOMOOLOO YANK - flashy dresser (WW2)
WOOMERA ROCKET RANGE - Unique military testing range covering 122 188 square kilometres in north-west South Australia. Largest land testing range in the world
WOOP WOOP - the back of nowhere; fictitious
WORLD SERIES CRICKET - one day cricket games for TV introduced by Kerry Packer
WOULDN'T BE DEAD FOR QUIDS - happy to be alive
WOULDN'T GIVE THE TIME OF DAY - dismissive
WOULDN'T HAVE A BAR OF IT - would have nothing to do with it
WOULDN'T TOUCH IT WITH A TEN FOOT POLE - having nothing to do with it
WOULDN'T WORK IN AN IRON LUNG - doesnt work
WOULD TO GODDER - for the man who 'would to god' he could go to the front, but preferred to stay at home (WW1)
WOWSER - boring conservative person; killjoy
WRAP YOUR LAUGHING GEAR 'ROUND THAT - to eat something
WUSS - weak ineffectual

Y

YA – You
YABBER - talk a lot
YABBY - small freshwater crayfish
YACKA - YAKKER - work; hard yacka. Jewish origin
YAHOO - show-off; fool
YARN - long story; talk
YEAH - NAH = No
YIKE - (getting into a ) dog-fight (RAAF)
YOBBO - uncouth, usually male
YONKS - very long time
YOU'RE NOT ROBINSON CRUSOE - not the only one
YOU'RE TERRIBLE MURIEL - line from iconic Australian movie Muriel's Wedding starring Toni Collette, Rachael Griffiths and Gabbie Millgate
YOUR SHOUT - turn to buy a drink
YOUS – (youse) plural of you!

Z

ZAC - sixpence
ZILCH - nothing
ZIT - pimple
ZONKED - tired



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