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Convict Ship Andromeda 1834


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Embarked: 175 women
Voyage: 115 days
Deaths 3
Surgeon's Journal - yes
Tons 408
Previous vessel: Roslin Castle arrived 15 September 1834
Next vessel: Henry Tanner arrived 26 October 1834
Captain Ben Gale
Surgeon Superintendent Henry Kelsall
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The Andromeda was built in Sunderland in 1819. Convicts were transported to Van Diemen's Land on the Andromeda in 1826 and to New South Wales in 1830, 1833 and 1834

The Andromeda departed Deal bound for Cork on 30th April 1834.

According to the Annual Report of the British Society for the promoting the reformation of female prisoners, the Irish convicts by the Andromeda were supplied with the usual Requisites by the Ladies committee; and gratifying intelligence had been received from Cork of the good effect that followed the Christian Labours of a few benevolent ladies there, who attended to the poor convicts at the time of their embarkation.

The Freemans Journal reported on 21st May........Saturday morning one hundred and seventy eight female convicts, from the Penitentiary in this city, and thirty eight free settlers, embarked on board the Waterloo steamer, Capt. Cotter, to be shipped on board the Andromeda convict ship to be conveyed to New South Wales whither they will take their departure very speedily. The majority were young women, in apparently good health, and seemed fully sensible of their degraded situation. The free settlers were the wives and children of convicts, whose conduct was such in their exile as induced the government, on the necessary recommendation, to grant them this indulgence. Other transports are shortly expected to convey male convicts, who are duly arriving in this city from different counties in Munster, Leinster and Connaught, convicted at the last assizes, - Cork Herald (Freemans Journal Wednesday 21 May 1834 p. 4)

One hundred and seventy six women were originally embarked on the Andromeda at Cork harbour. One woman, Mary Oates was re-landed and when they set sail for Sydney on 25th May 1834, 175 female prisoners were on board.

Free passengers included
Mary Manning with two children;
Martha Morron with two children;
Margaret Mason with two children;
Margaret Sheedy with three children;
Mary Ann Nixon or Welsh with one child;
Catherine Kiernan with three children;
Mary Cassack with three children;
Catherine Stanton with one child;
Johanna Neville with one child;
Mary Lyons or Hynes with two children;
Maria Ann Moran with one child;
Catherine O'Donnel with three children;
Margaret Kennedy with two children; and
Mary Shilrick or Sullivan.

There were also twenty-one children, families of the female prisoners, all under the age of five years. All were in a clean and healthy condition on embarking.

Henry Kelsall kept a Medical Journal from 16 May 1834 to 7 October 1834........For the first three weeks slight catarrhal complaints were numerous but these disappeared as the climate became warmer.   When the ship had been about a week at sea, half a pint of lemonade was served daily to the prisoners and free people which they enjoyed very much.  The lime juice lasted until after we passed the Cape of Good Hope, when the weather being colder a gill of wine was given every day to each individual and occasionally some preserved soup to the women who were suckling, and to the infirm.  Within the Tropics, I found a gill of the common ships wine, quite sufficient to produce inebriation in most of the women. The passage from the Cape towards Bass Straits was very boisterous; there being a continued storm nearly the whole way. The ship very leaky and the lower deck nearly always afloat; notwithstanding which and the coldness of the weather the women were generally healthy, and in good spirits.

Arrival of the convict ship Andromeda in 1834 - Sydney Herald 18 September 1834.  Find out more about the voyage of the Andromeda at Free Settler or Felon


On 17th September the Andromeda entered the heads of Port Jackson and the women had their first glimpse of Sydney Harbour. Two or three women had died on the passage out -  
Ellen Roche age 48, a poor feeble woman, she had given herself up to despair from the day of embarkation, from having been debarred taking a farewell of her husband at the gaol;
Bridget Costello age 50, a feeble and emaciated old woman who suffered from ascites and died on 17th September 1834. She was buried on shore at Sydney.
An infant, Honor Moloney aged 2 ½ died of phthisis as well.
Caroline Gosney had spent several years in the East Indies where she acquired Hepatitis. She was sent to the hospital in Sydney on arrival.

According to the shipping indents, one hundred and seventy two women were mustered on board on 22nd September 1834. Sick on board: 1; died at sea: 1; died in Sydney Harbour: 1; re-landed: 1.

The convict indents include such information as name, age, religion, education, marital status, family, native place, trade, offence, when and where tried, sentence, previous convictions, physical description and occasional notes as to colonial sentences and deaths. There is no information in the indents as to where or to whom the women were assigned after arrival.

The prisoners were landed on the morning of Tuesday 7th October at the Dockyard. They were assigned to various applicants and a few were forwarded to Parramatta by the Experiment steamer where they would have been admitted to the Female Factory.

The oldest women on the Andromeda were Frances Fielding, Margaret Letham and Ellen Long who were all sixty years of age. The youngest were Susan Flynn and Mary Ann Nowlan who were both aged 14.

Those bringing children with them included Mary Callaghan who brought 2 children, Mary Neil, Ellen Nix, Catherine Ryan, Rose Steven, Bridget Sinnett and Eliza Wilson who each brought one child.

The Andromeda was one of three convict ships bringing female prisoners to New South Wales in 1834, the others being the Numa and the George Hibbert. A total of 453 female convicts arrived in the colony in 1834.

Henry Kelsall was also employed as surgeon on the convict ships Margaret in 1837,  Waterloo in 1842 and the Cape Packet to Van Diemen's Land in 1842.

Catholic Priest William Bernard Ullathorne had been in the colony for eighteen months at the time of the arrival of the Andromeda having arrived in Australia on the Sir Thomas Munro in February 1833. He travelled extensively visiting the Hunter River, Bathurst, Norfolk Island and the Illawarra district all the while observing, absorbing impressions, gathering information and working as a Parish Priest. When he returned to England on an extended visit in 1836, he published The Catholic Mission in Australasia in which he wrote in part, of the fate awaiting females condemned to transportation.........

These few lines, dear reader, give a little information respecting the lot of the transported convict, and the labours and wants of the Australasian Mission.......What shall I say of the female convict, acknowledged to be worse, and far more difficult of reformation, than the man? Her general character is immodesty, drunkenness, and the most horrible language. On board the ship in which she sails, there is generally to be found some two or three grey-headed hags, the very incarnation of crime, who become the priestesses of initiation to the younger and more simple-minded during the voyage. Assigned to service, she becomes the object of persecution, either to her master—for they are assigned to all classes—or to some favourite servant. Does she defend herself—her life is made a torment. She is harassed, threats are held out—the police court is at hand, a tale is readily made out—truth is never looked for from a prisoner in self-defence—the police court is amused, the town echoes the laugh- of the police reporter, and the woman is doubly punished. Does she fall—she is returned to the factory, care is taken of her at the public expense—she remains nursing her child for two years, it is then separated from the mother, (who returns to service,) and is placed in an orphan school—no enquiry is made, and she returns again and again. I have baptized fourteen of these children at one time, whose mothers seldom gave any sign that they felt ashamed, or were conscious of any reason for such a feeling.
 
Notes & Links:  

1).  Recorder's Court - Catherine Hand, Anne Boylan and Dorothea Kennedy, were indicted for stealing a fowling piece and writing desk. Guilty Hand, an old offender, was sentenced to seven years' transportation; the other two seven months' imprisonment. John Prender, William Prender, Michael Hand and Anne Henrietta, were indicted for feloniously taking a coat, the property of...Byrne. Byrne stated that at about half past one o'clock on Sunday night he went into a house of bad character, where he slept, and upon waking in the morning his clothes were not to be found. The male prisoners were drinking in the house, and refused to let him got out; at length they gave him an old pair of shoes, upon which he went out and acquainted a person named Hill of the robbery. Joseph Hill saw Byrne on the morning after the robbery, he (Byrne) had then no hat or coat; he described the persons who refused to let him out ( he (Hill) then went and had them arrested, when they were searched, and duplicates for Byrne's clothes found upon one of them; the female prisoner had been with him in the house at a very late hour. Guilty. All old offenders. Transportation for seven years. - Freeman's Journal 11 July 1833

2). County of Antrim Assizes - Crown Court - Friday - Mary Crawford, for stealing at Belfast, in February, several shirts the property of John... and others - Guilty. 7 years transportation. - Belfast Newsletter 15 March 1833

3). County Armagh Assizes, Monday Third day - Jane Irwin aged 18, was indicted for stealing two cows, the property of George McCulloch at Keadymore on 4th May last. It appeared that the prosecutor was uncle to the prisoner, who, after having committed several depredations on the former, at length threatened to take his cows; this threat she carried into effect on the morning of the day specified; she was making arrangements to have them butchered when overtaken, about five miles distant, by the prosecutor. The prisoner  protested that stealing was not her intention; that she only wished to compel her uncle to support her, as her father and mother had turned her out of doors. The Jury found her guilty and she was sentenced to be transported for life....Mary Marshall, for stealing a cloak, the property of Mary Hewitt - Guilty; to be transported seven years....Bridget Kelly, for stealing wearing apparel, the property of her mistress, Rachael Spencer at Armagh, on 12th June - Guilty; transported 7 years. - Belfast Newsletter 30 July 1833



4). The following forty-four women have been identified residing in Newcastle and the Hunter Valley.

Maria Austin

Born in Tipperary c. 1807. Occupation Needlewoman. Maria was tried in Dublin on 2 March 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing a rug. She was described in the indents as 5ft 1in, with a ruddy complexion, dark sandy to grey hair, bluish eyes. 3 blue dots back of left hand and the bell of her left ear split. She was sent to Newcastle in 1833/34 where she married Thomas Bye a convict who arrived on the Waterloo in 1829. In 1837 at Newcastle they were both sentenced to 14 days in solitary confinement for drunkenness

 
Bridget Baldwin

Born at Carrick on Suir Co. Waterford. Tried in Tipperary October 1833. Sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing a cloak. Occupation servant. Stated to be married. She was sent to the factory for a month in 1835. In 1837 she was assigned to C.J. Brackenreg in Sydney. In 1838 an application for Bridget to marry Jonathan Farrow who had arrived free was refused. In 1840 an application to marry ticket of leave holder Henry Phanton was also refused. She was admitted to Newcastle gaol under a charge of drunkenness in April 1841 and was returned to government service.  Bridget was granted a Certificate of Freedom in June 1846.

 
Catherine Brady

Born c. 1819. Nurse girl from Dublin. Could not read or write. Tried October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing a ribbon. Two prior convictions. 4ft 11in, pale complexion, brown hair, grey eyes. Weak sighted, 4 moles back of left cheek, scar lower left arm. Assigned to William Harper at Oswald in January 1835, Catherine was sent to Newcastle gaol for 14 days in March 1835 and assigned to the service of Mrs. Hughes at Newcastle in May 1835. On 15th July 1835 she was sent by the Sydney Police to the 3rd Class Female Factory, Parramatta for a month. At Windsor in 1836 she married 34 year old Owen Sullivan who arrived on the Brampton

 
Catherine Carroll

Born c. 1812. Nursemaid from Waterford. Sentenced to 7 years transportation on 28 November 1832 for vagrancy. 5ft4in, ruddy and freckled complexion, light sandy hair, grey eyes, scar outer lower left eye, 3 blue dots back of left hand, another back of right. In April 1835 at Newcastle, Catherine married Thomas McDonnell who had arrived on the Asia in 1825. She was granted a Certificate of Freedom dated 11 March 1840.

 
Deborah Coffee

Age 19. Could not read or write. Nursemaid and straw plaiter. Tried in Limerick August 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing money. 4ft 11 1/2in, ruddy freckled complexion, dark brown hair, grey eyes, broad featured, nose short and broad, backs of hands freckled. Admitted to Sydney gaol in August 1835 and sent to the 3rd Class Female Factory, Parramatta for 2 months. In 1838 she was granted permission to marry Charles Hooper at Campbelltown. In June 1840 she was sent to Sydney from Newcastle to be admitted to the Female Factory. In May 1845 she was granted permission to marry John Metcalf at Newcastle. There is no record in BDM NSW of either marriage taking place. On 26th September 1845 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol under sentence of 48 hours in the cells for drunkenness and on 29th September admitted again for vagrancy. She died in Maitland in April 1846.

 
Mary Coleman

Age 25. Maid of all work from Kildare. Tried March 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for assault and robbery. 5ft 3in, fair and freckled complexion. Lost front upper tooth, scar back of left hand. In October she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 14 days in the cells. In October 1834 she was assigned to Major Rhode at Maitland. In May 1835 she re-assigned to Mrs. Gleeson at Maitland. She was returned to Newcastle in July and re-assigned to Mrs. Turner of Maitland. In March 1835 an application to marry William Daley at Maitland was approved.

 
Mary Daley

Age 20. Maid of all work from Co. Cork. Tried November 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing clothes. Ruddy complexion, Little fingers of both hands crooked. Scar back of left little finger. Light brown hair, blue eyes. Admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland in May 1835 under sentenced of 14 days in the cells. Assigned to William Cox of Maitland on release. She was granted permission to marry James Thomas at Maitland in February 1836. James Thomas arrived on the Agamemnon in 1820

 
Jane Delahunt

Age 20. Reads and writes. Maid of all work from Dublin. Sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing carpeting. Lost one front upper tooth, Scar left cheek. Admitted to Newcastle gaol under sentence of 2 months hard labour. Sent to the Female Factory at Parramatta 22 November 1835. Permission to marry Benjamin Price was refused in 1838 as Price had stated on arrival that he was married with 5 children. Jane was sent to the Female Factory for 2 months and 14 days in July 1840. Jane was granted a Certificate of Freedom dated 10th October 1840.

 
Alice Devine

Age 17. Nurse maid from Dublin. Tried in Kilkenny 19 July 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for passing base coin. 5ft 2 1/2in, Fair ruddy complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes, Scar left eyebrow, right little crooked. Nail left little finger split. Apprehended after absconding from service of P.J. Kelly at Maitland in August 1836 She was admitted to Sydney gaol and afterwards returned to Maitland. Granted a Ticket of Leave dated 11 November 1839 for the district of Liverpool. Ticket of leave cancelled in April 1840 for highly disorderly conduct. Sent to the Female Factory at Parramatta 12 February 1841. Granted a Certificate of Freedom on 9th April 1845.

 
Alicia Dixon

Age 19. Maid of all work from Dublin. Tried 1 October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing. Ruddy complexion, several pock marks right arm, dark brown hair, grey eyes. In November 1834 Alicia was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland. She was returned to govt service and then assigned to John Brown at Patrick Plains on 1 January 1835. In February 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Patrick Plains under sentence of 4 days in the cells. She was re-assigned to Mrs. Frost at Maitland 25 March 1835 and on 20th June 1835 admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 12 months confinement and then to be returned to government service. Alicia was re-assigned to Thomas Prentice at Maitland 4th August 1835. She was granted permission to marry Cornelius Croakley at Maitland in October 1836. In May 1840 she was described as a washerwoman when she absconded from John and Catherine Colbert. She was apprehended and thrown into Newcastle gaol in August 1840 and from there returned to government service. Her husband Cornelius Croakley was apprehended but not tried for house breaking in this same month. Alicia absconded again and was sent to Newcastle gaol in September 1840. In May 1841 she was apprehended after absconding from George Bridge at Wollombi. She was granted a Certificate of Freedom in October 1841. She was granted permission to marry James Reed at East Maitland in December 1845. James Reed arrived on the Mangles in 1837. In June 1848 two children were baptised in the Cassilis district - James Cokley Reed and Mary Jane Cokley Reed, the parents names James and Alicia Reed.

 
Mary Ann Dunn

23 years old and single. Mary Ann Dunn was tried in Dublin in February 1833 and sentenced to transportation for life for stealing saddlery. Her occupation was recorded as 'all work'. She had a previous conviction of 1 year imprisonment. She was 5ft 2 with a ruddy complexion and brown hair. She was granted permission to marry Henrick Darby at Campbelltown in 1837 although this marriage may not have taken place. By 1837 she was assigned to Captain P. King at Penrith.  This was almost certainly Captain Philip Parker King who became Commissioner of the A.A. Company at Port Stephens in 1839. Mary Ann married William Saunders at Port Stephens in May 1841. William Saunders had arrived free on the Currency Lass. Mary Ann Dunn was granted a ticket of leave for the district of Port Stephens in October 1842 and a Conditional Pardon in 1846.

 
Elizabeth Dunnin

Age 17. Nurse girl from Co. Armagh. Tried December 1832 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing clothes. 4ft 10in, ruddy complexion, brown hair, Scar on forefinger right hand etc. In November 1834 Elizabeth was admitted to Newcastle gaol under a sentence of 10 days in the cells. She had been assigned to Mary Ann Brunker who ran a store at Newcastle.  In 1837 Elizabeth was assigned to Harriet Silk at Maitland. In April 1838 she married Stephen Davis at Christchurch Newcastle. Stephen Davis arrived on the Royal Charlotte in 1825. In November 1840 Elizabeth Davis she was sent for trial in Maitland for larceny and sentenced to 8 months in the 3rd Class Female Factory, every 4th week in solitary confinement. She was admitted to Newcastle gaol again in 1844

 
Mary Evans

Age 22. Housemaid and nursery maid from Tipperary. Tried in July 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing bank notes. Left little finger crooked, Ruddy complexion, brown hair and eyes. In June 1835 she was granted permission to marry Charles Ashby. Charles Ashby arrived on the Camden in 1831 and was assigned to Henry Dumaresq at Invermein. Mary Evans was granted a Ticket of Leave in November 1835 for the district of Invermein. Charles Ashby was employed as a miller at Maitland and later Muswellbrook. At least one of their children was buried in the old cemetery at East Maitland. Mary's Certificate of Freedom in July 1840 was listed at Muswellbrook.

 
Bridget Finn

Age 25. Tried in Kilkenny in October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for house breaking. 5ft, ruddy complexion, brown hair. Bridget was assigned to John Portus in Maitland in 1836/37.  In May 1836 she was granted permission to marry William Bentham however two years later William Bentham was granted permission to marry another woman.

 
Eliza Fitzsimmons

Age 17. Nurse girl from Dublin. Tried October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for picking pockets. 5ft, ruddy complexion, Cast inward in left eye, dark brown hair, brown eyes. On 30 December 1834 Eliza was admitted to Newcastle gaol having been returned to govt., service. She was re-assigned to Mr. Cox at Maitland on 27 January 1835.  In March 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 7 days in the cells and to be returned to government service. She was re-assigned to Walter Rotton on 30 April.  On 20th June 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 14 days solitary and to be returned to government service. She was re-assigned to Thomas Prentice at Maitland 4th August 1835. In January 1836 she was assigned to Mr. Langham at Newcastle when she was charged with theft and disorderly conduct after she struck at Mrs. Langham with her fist and stole tobacco. At Maitland in June 1836, she was granted permission to marry Peter Byron a convict who arrived on the Speke in 1826 and had been working as a shepherd for George Blaxland near Merton. Theirs was not always a happy union and Eliza was left to manage when her husband was sent to No. 3 iron gang at Newcastle Stockade for 2 years in 1845.

 
Margaret Flood

Age 19. Nursery maid and house maid from Dublin. Tried October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing clothes. One previous conviction of 7 months. On 10th March 1835 Margaret Flood was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 10 days in the cells and then to be returned to service. Sent to her master 8 April.  On 21st April she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 14 days in the cells and to return to her mistress. On 4th July 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland having been returned to government service. Re-assigned to Mary Ann Hewson at Newcastle 9 July. On 22 July 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol having been returned to government service. She was married to William Pacey in August 1835. William Pacey arrived on the Countess of Harcourt in 1828. Their children were William, Samuel, Clara, Alfred, James and George. Margaret Flood died in January 1851 at Dungog. An inquest found she died of natural causes accelerated by drunkenness.

 
Bridget Flynn

Age 22. Nursemaid from Waterford. Tried 4th April 1833 in Cork and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing shoes. 5ft 2in, ruddy complexion, brown hair hazel eyes. Scar right upper lip etc. In 1837 she was assigned to D. Woodriffe at Penrith. In August 1837 she was granted permission to marry James Hay who arrived on the Lady Harewood in 1831. She was granted a ticket of leave for the district of Maitland in November 1838. When she received her Certificate of Freedom in September 1845 she was recorded as the wife of James Hay.

   
Susan Flynn

Age 14. Nurse girl from Dublin. Tried January 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing a shawl. Two prior convictions. 4ft 10, ruddy freckled complexion, dark brown hair, chestnut eyes, two pockmarks between eyebrows. scar centre forehead.  On 3 October 1834 Susan Flynn was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Sydney. She was assigned to Mr. McDonogh at Maitland 17 January 1835.  On 13th March 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 6mths imprisonment. Her conduct was noted as noisy and disorderly. Thomas Hogan was granted permission to marry her in April 1835; William Dymock was granted permission to marry her in August 1835; She was assigned to Lieut. Campbell 28th regt., at Green Hills 15 September 1835. Christopher Motley was granted permission to marry her and they were married at Christchurch Newcastle in January 1837. Witnesses at the marriage were Patrick and Mary Rice.   In October 1838 Susan was apprehended after absconding from service of William Kelman at Patrick Plains.  In August 1840 she received a Certificate of Freedom. When she was arrested in December of that year she was described as a 'smart looking young woman'. In the following years she was in and out of Newcastle and Sydney gaols and the factory at Parramatta for crimes such as theft, drunkenness, obscene language, making a nuisance of herself and being a rogue and a vagabond. The Maitland Mercury recorded her death in December 1863.... Death of a well known character - An old character of the name of Susan Flynn, better known in Maitland, Singleton and along almost all the Northern Road, by the name of old Suke Flynn, was found dead in her bed yesterday morning (16th). The deceased had been stopping at Mr. Thurlow's Hotel here for some short time past and was in a very feeble and emaciated condition when first coming here, and was attended by Dr. Burrell. She had been for years a most dissolute character, and her constitution was completely shattered from the effects of intemperance and disease.

 
Margaret Fowler

19 years of age. Nurse and house maid. Tried in Dublin in October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing clothes. One prior conviction of 7 months. Margaret Fowler was in and out of gaol over the next twenty three years. She was often apprehended for drunkenness, obscene language, assault, vagrancy and keeping a disorderly house. Her death was reported in the Maitland Mercury which had reported so many of her misdemeanours in previous years....September 1857 Durham Street Tragedy - An inquest was held yesterday morning at the Race Horse Inn by Dr. McCartney touching on the death of Margaret Fowler. Eliza Gunter deposed that she resided in Durham Street and knew both the deceased and the two prisoners Mary Clarke and Mary Sylvester. On Sunday last Mary Clarke and the deceased had some words when they went out to fight; witness could not say which of them proposed to fight; they fought several rounds like men; after a little the deceased fell down and Mary Clarke on the top of her; the latter then said " now I have got you I'll kill you' after great scuffling they again got up; the deceased was then very bloody they again went to fight when in about four minutes the deceased fell down but rose again and walked a few steps when she again fell and rose no more. The coroner found that Margaret had met her death by falling on a broken bottle whilst fighting with Mary Clark in Durham Street Maitland and Mary Clark was committed for trial for her manslaughter.

 
Bridget Gleeson

Single woman aged 24 with one child. Tried at Waterford on 21st October 1832 and sentenced to transportation for 7 years for picking pockets. In March 1836 Bridget was admitted to Sydney Gaol from Newcastle. She was sent to the Female Factory at Parramatta. She was refused permission to marry Thomas Aspel at Newcastle in 1836. She was granted permission to marry Patrick Kain in April 1838 at Castlereagh.

 
Caroline Gosney

Age 22. Nursemaid from Edinburgh. Tried in Roscommon in March 1833 and sentenced to transportation for life for stealing jewellery. 5ft, fair complexion, sandy brown hair, hazel eyes. Genteel looking.  In Maitland in 1839 she was refused permission to marry Allan Ramsay who arrived on the Clorinda as she had stated she was married on arrival in the colony . She was granted a ticket of leave for the district of Maitland in October 1843. She was granted a conditional pardon in 1849. She died in Sydney in 1873.

 
Mary Griffen

Age 23. Tried in Cork 16th August 1833 and sentenced to transportation for 7 years for stealing gowns. 4ft 10, ruddy complexion, brown hair, blue eyes. On 16th January 1835 Mary was admitted to Newcastle gaol after being returned to govt., service. She was re-assigned to Rev. Threlkeld at Newcastle on 24 January 1835. As a single woman, she gave birth to a son William Condon Griffen, who was baptised at Christchurch Newcastle on 9 December 1835. Later in December 1835 she married James McDonald at Christchurch. Witness at the marriage was William Condon. James McDonald arrived on the Countess of Harcourt in 1828 and had been assigned to George Sparke at Woodlands as had William Condon.  Mary was assigned to John Thomas at Newcastle in 1837. She was granted a ticket of leave for the district of Newcastle on 24th July 1839.

 
Mary Gunning alias Grandoe or Gradridge

Age 25. Tried in Galway in October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing clothes. 4ft 11, ruddy complexion, light sandy brown hair, large features. In 1837 she was assigned to John Brown in Sydney. On 22 December 1840 she appeared before Magistrate Lieut. Scheberas in Maitland and was sentenced to 10 days in Newcastle gaol for drunk and disorderly conduct. In April 1841 she was apprehended at Newcastle for being drunk and disorderly and on 10th April she was sentenced to 14 days solitary confinement for being absent without leave from her place of assignment. She was granted permission to marry Thomas Collins at Armidale in August 1847. Thomas Collins arrived on the Andromeda in 1833

 
Elizabeth Hunter

Age 17. Born in Belfast. Tried in Antrim 13 March 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing gowns. 4ft 11, ruddy freckled complexion, sandy hair, scar on centre of forehead.. On 28th April 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 14 days in the cells and to be returned to government as her master J. Madden of Maitland was considered an improper person to have an assigned servant.  Elizabeth was re-assigned to Mrs. Ryan at Maitland 25 May. In June 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 28 days solitary confinement. She was re-assigned to John B. Squire at Anvil Creek on 29 August. In 1837 she was assigned to John Butler Hewson at Newcastle. In August 1840 she was granted a Certificate of Freedom. She was 30 years old in 1847 when she was granted permission to marry Thomas Williams at Paterson. Thomas Williams arrived on the Aurora in 1833.

 
Jane Irwin

Age 19. Born in Pennsylvania, America. Laundress and housemaid tried in Co. Armagh 22 July 1833 and sentenced to transportation for life for cow stealing. 5ft 2, dark sallow complexion. Front upper teeth pronounced. On 3 March 1835 Jane was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 14 days in the cells and return to government service. She was re-assigned to Thomas Murphy at Paterson 23 May. In December 1836 at Newcastle she was assigned to Dr. Mallon when she was charged with disorderly conduct having been found in bed with 2 men by constable John Butler Hewson.  She was sentenced to 14 days in the cells. Jane was granted permission to marry William Handibo at Maitland in 1837. She was granted permission to marry Michael Duffy in 1837 at Maitland.  She was refused  permission to marry Michael Holan in Wollongong in 1839.  In November 1842 she was granted a ticket of leave for the district of Windsor and also in this year permission to marry William Trott at Windsor. She was granted permission to marry Thomas Gribble at Wilberforce in 1847. Note - these marriages may not have taken place.

 
Bridget Kelly alias Walsh

Age 20. Widow with 1 child. Occupation washerwoman. Tried in Armagh 22 July 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing in a dwelling house. 5ft 1, ruddy freckled complexion. Granted a ticket of leave in July 1839. At Maitland in February 1840 Richard Stark age 40 who arrived on the Royal Charlotte, was granted permission to marry Bridget Kelly. At Raymond Terrace in February 1841 Daniel McCullum age 35 arrived on the 'John' was granted permission to marry Bridget Kelly.

 
Catherine Kent

Age 16. Needlewoman from Dublin. Tried 26 January 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for shop lifting. 5ft 2in, dark freckled complexion. Mole on back of left cheek bone. On 11th November 1834 Catherine was admitted to Newcastle gaol under sentence of 14 days in the cells and to be returned to govt., She was re-assigned to William Harper at Oswald on 23 January 1835. On 3rd March 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 14 days in the cells and returned to government service. This time she was assigned to Walter Rotton at Maitland. On 23 April 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 28 days in the cells and then return to government service. She was re-assigned to John Brown at Patrick Plains 18 June. On 25th July 1835 Catherine was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Patrick Plains under sentence of 14 days in the cells and return to government. This time she was to be married to Thomas Phillips of Darlington who arrived on the England in 1826. She was discharged from gaol on 24 August 1835 and married Thomas Phillips on the same day.

 
Margaret Letham

Age 60. Married with 5 children. Tried in Co. Tyrone in April 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for receiving stolen goods. 5ft 3in, sallow complexion, brown grey hair, hairy mole top of chin. She received a ticket of leave for the district of Maitland in November 1838. It may have been Margaret who was accidentally killed at East Maitland on 28 December 1854.

 
Catherine McCabe

Age 30. Tried in Co. Galway October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for 7 years for stealing clothes. Brown freckled complexion. Lost a front tooth. Catherine was admitted to Sydney gaol on 19th January 1835 under sentence of 14 days confinement and was sent to the Female Factory at Parramatta on 20th January 1835. In March she was returned to the the factory, 3rd Class division. She was granted permission to marry James Maher at Maitland in January 1838. James Maher arrived on the Governor Ready in 1829

 
Sarah McHugh/ McCue

Age 24. Laundry maid from Co. Mayo. Tried 25 July 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for picking pockets. 5ft 1in, ruddy complexion. At Maitland in February 1836 she was granted permission to marry William Barnett who arrived on the Recovery in 1819.

 
Agnes McQuade

Age 18. Maid of all work from Dublin. Tried in December 1832 and sentenced to transportation for 7 years for picking pockets. Ruddy freckled complexion, brown hair. In Maitland in June 1836 permission was granted for the marriage of Agnes to Robert Furze who arrived on the Nithsdale in 1830. Robert was employed as a constable at Paterson.

 
Rose Mitchell

Age 25. Married with 1 child. Dairy maid. Born in Co. Galway. Tried in Co. Clare in August 1833 and sentenced to transportation for 7 years. Sallow complexion, brown hair and eyes. Front teeth projecting. Dixon Belsey an overseer employed by John Smith at Newcastle applied to marry Rose in May 1835 however the marriage to Belsey did not take place as Rose was already married. He married another women the following year.  On 3 September 1835 Rose was admitted to Sydney Gaol and was to be sent to the 1st Class at Parramatta Female Factory. She was granted a ticket of leave for the district of Windsor in 1838 and a Certificate of Freedom in September 1842.

 
Hannah Moloney alias Cannon

Age 19. Kitchen maid from Tipperary. Tried in July 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for picking pockets. 5ft. Brown freckled complexion. In March 1835 Admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 14 days in the cells and return to government service. Re-assigned to William Nowland at Maitland 26 May. In April 1836 Hannah applied for permission to marry Neil Tinney at Newcastle. Neil Tinney was 48 years old and had arrived on the Phoenix in 1826. In 1840 she applied for permission to marry James Cannon who arrived on the Ferguson in 1829. Hannah was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Dungog in May 1850 under sentence of 12 months hard labour.

 
Jane Monaghan

Age 26. Laundress and kitchen maid from Galway. Tried in Mayo in July 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for picking pockets. In November 1834 Jane was assigned to Mrs. Turner. She was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 14 days in the cells and then return to govt., service. In January 1835 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol under sentence of 14 days in the cells and return to government. She was re-assigned to Alexander Larrymore at Williams River on 13 March. In December 1835 Jane was assigned to William Sparke when she was charged with disorderly conduct and sentenced to 7 days in the cells In August 1836 she married Thomas Rogers from Merton who had arrived on the Hebe in 1820.

 
Cecily Mongan

Age 23. Born in Co. Mayo. Tried in Galway in October 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for shop lifting.  4ft 11in, freckled arms. In February 1835 admitted to Newcastle gaol from Newcastle district under sentence of 14 days in the cells and return to government service. Re-assigned to John Bourke at Lochinvar 27 March 1835. In Maitland in November 1836 Cecily applied for permission to marry Patrick Mahon

 
Eleanor Moore

Age 22. Maid of all work from Waterford. Tried 1 January 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing money. One prior conviction of 3 months. Dark ruddy complexion, scar on right side of forehead. Eleanor was assigned to Mr. Coulson in Maitland in 1837. She was granted a ticket of leave for the district of Maitland in April 1839 and in July 1840 married William Baker at Maitland. William Baker had arrived on the Portland and had also been assigned to Mr. Coulson. Eleanor was granted a Certificate of Freedom in July 1847

 
Mary Mucklevaney (McElvaney)

Age 15. Nurse girl from Waterford. Tried 1 January 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing a penknife. One prior conviction of 3 months. 4ft 11. Dark ruddy complexion. Married Peter Clynch at Maitland in July 1835. Peter Clynch arrived on the Henry Porcher in 1825. Under the name of Mary Clinch, she was sentenced to transportation for life at the Supreme Court Maitland in March 1843 for uttering forged cheque to defraud Alfred Skinner. The sentence was commuted to 7 years.

 
Catherine Mulowney

Age 19. Kitchen maid from Co. Meath. Tried in Drogheda in March 1833 and sentenced to transportation for 7 years for highway robbery. 5ft 1in, full featured, mole on left cheek and left side of chin. Applied to marry John Cunningham in March 1835. John Cunningham arrived on the Sir Godfrey Webster in 1826.

 
Catherine Murphy

Age 24. Maid of all work from Waterford. Sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing a watch. Ruddy and freckled. Scar on each side of nose. In March 1835 admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland under sentence of 28 days in the cells and return to government service. Re-assigned to Dr. Brooks at Newcastle on 27 May 1835. In June re-admitted to Newcastle gaol having been returned to government service, not being the sort of servant required. Re-assigned to Phillip Joseph Cohen at Maitland on 6 June 1835. On 30th June 1835 admitted to Newcastle gaol 30 June under sentence of 4 months confinement . Re-assigned to William Dun at Paterson on 6th November. In September 1837 Catherine was on the List of Runaways apprehended during the previous week having absconded from John Ludwig. At Newcastle in 1838 she applied to marry free emigrant James Malowney

 
Mary Neill

No. 235.  Age 32. Single woman with one child on board. Born in Wicklow. Maid of all work. Tried at Kildare in March 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for sheep stealing.. 5ft 1, sallow, freckled complexion, brown hair, grey eyes. Lost part of front upper tooth. Eyebrows meeting. Scar back of left forefinger.   Assigned to Mr. Templeton at Concord in 1834.  At age 36 applied to marry Richard Payne at Maitland in 1838. Richard Payne arrived on the Lady Harewood in 1832 and resided in the Paterson district. When Mary received a Certificate of Freedom in September 1842 she was residing at Paterson

   
Mary Neill

No. 288. Age 26. Maid of all work from Waterford. Convicted of vagrancy on 23 November 1832. One prior conviction of 3 months. Sallow complexion, sandy hair, hazel eyes. Scar back of ball left thumb. Assigned to John Smith at Newcastle. In January 1836 when Mary applied to marry Timothy McCarty (per Jane 1831), it was stated on the application that John Smith being the Master of both had agreed to keep the couple employed until Timothy McCarty obtained his ticket of leave. Mary died at Newcastle in October 1836 and was buried in the Christ Church burial ground.

 
Mary Robinson alias Ryan

Age 17. Nurse maid from Kilkenny. Tried April 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing clothes. Nose a little cocked. Scar over right eyebrow. Wart back of right middle finger. Assigned to Newcastle in 1834. In July 1835 she was granted permission to marry William Fowler at Maitland. Granted a ticket of leave in November 1838 for the district of Penrith, however this cancelled when she failed to attend a muster in September 1839. Granted a Certificate of Freedom dated 22 February 1844, wife of William Fowler who arrived on the Marquis of Huntley in 1830

 
Eleanor Smith

Age 22. Born in Co. Westmeath. Laundress. Tried in Co. Armagh June 1833 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing calico. 5' 1 1/2"; ruddy, freckled and a little pock pitted complexion. Brown hair, hazel eyes,  Previous conviction of 6 months. On 21st March 1837 Absconded from the Female Factory at Parramatta. On 18th July 1839 absconded from Rev. G.K. Rusden at Maitland. Eleanor married James Honey at Newcastle in October 1839. James Honey arrived on the Guildford in 1822 and had been employed as a constable in Maitland at various times. In August 1840 she was admitted to Newcastle gaol from Maitland on a charge of larceny.

 
Ellen Wilby

Age 20. Kitchen maid born in Kilkenny. Tried 9th March 1833 and sentenced to transportation for life for highway robbery. Lost part of upper front tooth. Brown hair, blue/grey eyes. She was assigned to R. Ormiston in Sydney in 1834. In June 1837 she was assigned to Mrs. Hannell at Newcastle when she was sentenced to 14 days solitary confinement in Newcastle gaol. In August 1837 she absconded from W. Green of Maitland. In October 1837 at Maitland she was granted permission to marry William Lamb who arrived on the Sesostris. She was granted a ticket of leave for the district of Maitland in January 1845.


The Andromeda departed Sydney for Westernport in January 1835. The Colonist reported in June 1835..... She left Launceston the latter end of May, and which put into this port (Sydney) a short time since in a leaky state, took in a considerable part of her cargo (180 tons of Mimosa bark) at Western Port, an inlet situated on the southern coast of New Holland. Whilst taking in the bark, and when the shipment was nearly completed, a numerous tribe of aborigines made their appearance, of whom twelve were invited on board and treated in a most hospitable manner by Captain Gales; but, unfortunately, his kindness was thrown away ; for, on the following morning, after the crew had gone onboard, the' blacks proceeded to demolish the bark cart, carefully extracting from the fragments every particle of iron, with which they retired into the interior, taking with them at the same time, the implements used in the process of barking. So soon as Captain Gales was made aware of his loss, his crew, each armed with a musket, set off in pursuit of the thieves, but was only fortunate enough to come up with two blacks, who, after one of them had received a blow on the head from one of the sailors, made their escape. On the following day, the blacks amply revenged the indignity to which their countrymen had been subjected; for having fallen upon a sailor who was barking a tree at some little distance from his companion, they succeeded in planting five spears in his arm, one of which having pierced through the arm, inflicted a dreadful wound in his side, which, at the time, it was thought would prove mortal. The poor fellow was immediately taken in a state of in-sensibility on board the ship, where the spears were cut out. We are glad to learn, that the poor man was completely recovered before the Andromeda left Launceston. As a warning to the owners of' ships of heavy tonnage, we may mention, that the leaky state of the Andromeda, is attributed to injuries which she received in the Tamar, having laid aground whilst at Launceston every ebb tide, and having grazed the bottom twice, while coming down the river. - The Colonist June 1835.




 


 

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