Hunter Valley Inns & Hotels

The Scone Inn

 


Thomas Glanfield had formerly been innkeeper at the Golden Fleece Inn at Scone.

He took over the Scone Inn in October 1845. .....Thomas Glanfield in returning thanks to his friends and the public generally, for the liberal patronage he enjoyed during his stay at the Golden Fleece, St. Aubin's begs to apprise them that he has, at the instance of many, removed into a new and more commodious premises in the township of Scone, where he intends to conduct his business as formerly. (1)

In March 1846 he announced improvements....The Scone Inn, Family Hotel, and Mail Coach House was established by Thomas Glanfield about two years ago at the instance and invitation of a large majority of influential and leading settlers in the neighbourhood and adjacent districts. Under this support, and public custom generally it has attained that satisfactory hostelry reputation which calls upon the Proprietor to discharge his duty of thanks by a public acknowledgment. The recommendation which T.G. submits for general observation is, that the Establishment is large and commodious - entirely a new buildings and replete with every comfort recognised in the familiar and domestic Family Hotel and Posting House in the mother country.

Gentlemen from New England and Liverpool Plains districts will find the stabling and paddocks affording the best accommodation whether required for single boxes for stud horses or not. (2)

He announced he was leaving the colony to return to England in June 1848

Auctioneer Mr. Crofton was advertising to sell: All the Stock in Trade, household furniture, horses and cattle belonging to Glanfield.  Amongst the furniture were cane bottom  chairs, dining and dressing tables, sideboard, chests of drawers, wash stands, sofas, beds, bedsteads and bedding, Looking glasses, fenders and fire irons, glass and earthenware a large assortment of Culinary utensils.

The Stock in Trade consisted of an assortment of wines and spirits ale beer and porter both in wood and bottle about 200 weight of prime Negro head tobacco, bar kegs taps empty casks stack of hay a quantity of corn, poultry, one horse dray and harness. Also a number of Horses and mares, milking cows, bullocks steers and heifers were for sale.

Thomas French was granted a publicans' license for the Scone Inn in October 1848.

 

Notes and Links:

Mr and Mrs Glanfield arrived on the Duchess of Kent from London via the Cape on 5th January 1838 (Sydney Monitor)

Witness in court case Maitland Mercury 11 July 1846

 

 

References:

(1) Sydney Morning Herald 22 October 1845

(2) Sydney Morning Herald 23 March 1846

(5) Maitland Mercury 21 June 1848


 

 

 

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