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Convict Ship Indispensable 1796

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(Convicts and passengers from this ship only)


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Select from the Links below to find information about Convict Ships arriving in New South Wales, Norfolk Island and Van Diemen's Land between the years 1788 and 1850

A B C D E F G H I
                 
J -K L M N - O P - Q R S T - V W - Y


Embarked:  133 females
Voyage: 5 1/2 months
Deaths 2
Surgeon's Journal: no
Tons: 351
Previous vessel: Marquis Cornwallis arrived 11 February 1796
Next vessel: Lady Shore
Master William Wilkinson
Follow the Female Convict Ship Trail
The Indispensable arrived at Portsmouth on 5 October 1795 and soon began embarking convicts.

The women had been gathered from throughout England - Southampton, Middlesex, Cumberland, Stafford, Lincoln, Lancaster, York, Nottingham, Wiltshire etc. They were probably brought in chains on carts or carriages from the various counties. Those tried in London were probably held in Newgate prison.

The Indispensable was the next convict ship to leave England for New South Wales after the departure of the Sovereign in May 1795 and the next convict ship to leave England with female prisoners after the Surprize in May 1794.

Only two convict ships arrived in New South Wales in 1796 - the Marquis Cornwallis and the Indispensable.

Having loaded her prisoners and provisions, the Indispensable departed England on 11 November 1795(1)

She called at Rio de Janeiro for fresh supplies before continuing on to Port Jackson. One hundred and thirty-one prisoners arrived in Port Jackson on 30 April 1796 two women having died on the voyage out. The Indispensable brought enough provisions for the women for nine months after arrival. A muster of the women who arrived on the Indispensable and Marquis Cornwallis took place on 9th July in Sydney. By the time of the arrival of the Indispensable about 1200 female prisoners had been embarked in England and Ireland but there were not nearly so many in the colony, as some had lost their lives on the voyage out and others after arrival. A (very) few had managed to escape.



From the chart below it can be seen that less than 950 women were accounted for by 1796......




Some of the women were sent to Parramatta on arrival. A new gaol was built there in this year and weaving looms were to be established. Other women remained in assigned service in Sydney, living in huts with the families or forming relationships with men then in the colony.


Notes about some of the women of the Indispensable......

Mary Brown a soldier's wife is listed in the 1816 Muster as having arrived as a Free passenger on the Indispensable.

Sarah Bird age 24 was tried at the Old Bailey 16 July 1794 and sentenced to 7 years transportation for Grand Larceny. She later became the first female innkeeper in Australia.


Convict Sarah Fisher of the Indispensable died in Sydney in February 1797 just ten months after stepping off the ship. Sarah was 30 years old when she was tried at the Southwell and Scrooby Liberty at Nottingham on 16th July 1795 and sentenced to 7 years transportation to Botany Bay. She had survived the great flood of Nottingham the previous March and a voyage half way round the world but the perils of Botany Bay proved too much. She was buried in the Old Sydney Burial Ground as were many others in these first few years.

Two other women from Nottingham also arrived on the Indispensable - sisters-in-law Maria and Elizabeth Hainsley. The three women had probably all made the journey by carriage and in chains from Nottingham to London. There were only three other women in the colony who had been tried in Nottingham at this time - Jane Woodward and Mary Stubbins arrived in 1791 and Mary Green in 1792.

Convict Mary Cox was a single woman of 22 years when she was tried at Middlesex Gaol Delivery on 20th May 1795 and sentenced to 7 years beyond the seas for stealing clothing belonging to her employer. She had been employed as a servant in an Inn. Her trial can be found at The Proceedings of the Old Bailey Online.......My master used me very ill at the time that he sent for the constable to take me up, and so did my mistress; and when I came here to the prison, I had the black and blue in my arms where he pinched me, and threw me down, and he served another poor girl the same before, that old cotton gown my mistress said that she would give it me, and how it came in my box I don't know. I told her the work was too hard for me without she could get a woman to help me to clean the house, as the house had been white washed, and painted all over. Mary Cox was granted a Certificate of Freedom in 1810 and later married Edward Swadling.

Seven other prisoners of the Indispensable were tried on the same day among them 16 year old Margaret Stocker who was sentenced to 7 years transportation. Margaret married Isaac Cornwall in 1797.

Only two of the women were tried in Northumberland Jane Trotter and Mary Weir. Jane Trotter was granted 30 acres of land by Col. Paterson and in 1810 petitioned Gov. Macquarie to retain the grant. Mary Weir later married John Larkham at Parramatta.

The Indispensable transported one of the few females who managed to make their escape from the colony. Mary Ann Fielding was 19 when she was tried at the Old Bailey on 1st July 1795 and sentenced to 7 years transportation. She had been accused of stealing a pair of shoes. She claimed innocence..... I was coming through Widegate-alley, and I had got a joint of meat in my apron, and a man came and laid hold of me, and then some gentleman that is here, came and brought something out. I know nothing about it, I am as innocent as a child that is just born; I never was guilty of any such thing in my life - but her pleas fell on deaf ears even though her mother was in court and she was given a good character by another. According to Clare Anderson in The Limits of British Colonial Control in South Asia .. Mary Ann Fielding escaped to Calcutta on the Marquis Cornwallis in 1796. In 1800 a Proclamation in Bengal stating that convicts escaped from New South Wales would be apprehended and detained in custody was published. (1)

Mary Ann Fielding returned to England where she returned to her mother only to find her lying dead. She was given into custody and again appeared before the Judges at the Old Bailey on a charge of returning from custody. (Old Bailey Online) She was sentenced to death for her crime but was reprieved and later transported on the Nile in 1801.

Most of the women had committed petty crimes such as the ones listed above and arrived under a seven year sentence, however there were several who had been sent for life -

Frances Moulton Cranmer - On 1st July 1795 received a sentence of transportation for life Middlesex. Later married Francis Cox.

Mary Thorpe - Convicted Middlesex Gaol Delivery. Married Jeremiah Buffy in 1817

Mary Mullet - Summer Assizes - At Winchester Assizes the following prisoners received sentence of death.....Mary Mullett convicted of a burglary at the Lent Assizes, but respited on the score of pregnancy. She received a reprieve and was sentenced to transportation. (The Times 6 August 1794)

Sarah Eldridge - Old Bailey - The trials being ended the Recorder proceeded to pass sentence on the convicts and in a pathetic speech pronounced judgment of death on John Rabbitts, Charles Beazley, William Brown alias Bartlett, Sarah Eldridge, John Alexander, Henry Goodrif, Jeremiah Love and William Thomas (The Times 11 December 1793)......Sarah Eldridge, capital convict whose judgments had been respited during his Majesty's pleasure, was pardoned on condition of transportation to New South Wales for the term of her natural life. Four other convicts also respited rejected clemency and were remanded to the cells in execution of their former judgement. (The Times 8 May 1794)

Ann Lamb - On Saturday 19 prisoners were tried at the Old Bailey, eight of whom were convicted of felony, three of misdemeanours, and eight were acquitted. The same day sentence was passed, when Russell Farmer, William Ball, Mary Finlayson, Maria Perres alias Ferres, Ann Lamb, and Ann Clark received judgement of death. (The Times 16th December 1794)

Mary Boucher - Mary Boucher, George Higeson, Robert Armstrong, Abraham Abrahams, Mary Thorpe, Alexander Loraine and Samuel Evans, capital convicts who had been respited during his Majesty's pleasure received sentence to be transported for the term of their natural lives to NSW (Times 22 July 1794)

Esther Spencer - On Saturday 17 prisoners were tried at the Old Bailey, two of whom were capitally convicted viz Esther Spencer for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Jacob Ruffey two silver salt cellars, two silver salt spoons and other articles; Elizabeth Thomas for privately stealing from the person of Edward Lee, a canvas bag containing 13s. The same day sentence was passed when Elizabeth Thomas, William Leeson, John Downs, James Ample William Wood, Thomas Doyle and Esther Spencer received judgement of death (The Times 22 July 1794).

Ann Clark - On Saturday 19 prisoners were tried at the Old Bailey, eight of whom were convicted of felony, three of misdemeanours, and eight were acquitted. The same day sentence was passed, when Russel Farmer, William Ball, Mary Finlayson, Maria Perres alias Ferres, Ann Lamb, and Ann Clark received judgement of death. (The Times 16th December 1794)

  


The following letter was published in the Sporting Magazine in December 1798.....

BOTANY BAY.
 

Letter from a Woman, lately transported to, that Settlement, to her Father.

I take the first opportunity of informing you of my safe arrival in this remote quarter of the world, after a pretty good passage of six months. Since my arrival I have purchased a house, for which I gave twenty pounds, and the following articles, which are three turkie's, at 15s. each; three sucking pigs, at 10s.; a pair of pigeons, at 8s.; a yard dog, 2l, two Muscovy ducks, at 10s. each; three English ducks, at 5s. each; and a goat, five guineas; six geese, at 15s. each. I have got a large garden to the house and a licence. The sign is the "Three Jolly Settlers." I have met with tolerable good success since in the public line. I did a little trade on the passage here in a number of small articles, such as sugar, tea, tobacco, thread, snuff, needles, and every thing that I could get any thing by. The needles are a shilling a paper here, and fine thread is sixpence a skain. I have sold my petticoats at two guineas each, and my long black cloak at ten guineas, which shews that black silk sells well here: the edging that I gave is. 8d. per yard for in England, I got 5s. for here. I have sold all the worst of my cloaths, as wearing apparel brings a good price. I bought a roll of tobacco at Rio Janeiro of 541b. weight, which cost me 20s. which I was cheated out of: I could have got 12s. a pound for it here. I likewise bought a cwt. of sugar there, and also many other articles. Rum sells for is. 6d. per gallon there, and here, at times, 2I. Any person coming from England with a few hundred pounds laid out at any of the ports that shipping touch at coming here, are likely to make a fortune. Shoes that cost 4s. or 5s. a pair in England, will bring from 10s. to 15s. here. On our passage here we buried only two women and two children. The climate is very healthful, and likewise very fertile, as there are two crops a year of almost every thing; and I really believe, with the assistance of God,' by the time that I have paid the forfeit, according to the laws of my country, I shall acquire a little money to re turn home with, which I have not the smallest doubt of, and to be a comfort to you at the latter end of your days. Any person that should have a mind to come out here as a Settler, by applying at the Secretary of State's Office, may have a free passage, and likewise two men and a farm here, which is great encouragement. I should be very glad to hear from you the first opportunity : I live by myself, and did not do as the rest of the women did on the passage, which was, every one of them that could, had a husband. I shall conclude with giving my kind love to my brothers and sisters, nieces and nephews, so am, dear Father, your ever Dutiful, loving, and affectionate Daughter till death. S. B.  




Notes & Links:

1). Hunter Valley convicts/ passengers arriving on the Indispensable in 1796

2). Convict Ships bringing prisoners to New South Wales in 1796 - Marquis Cornwallis and Indispensable.

3). Colonial Events 1796


References:

(1). Anderson, Clare., The Limits of British Colonial Control in South Asia