Hunter Valley Colonial Medical Practitioners

Henry White

Port Stephens

 

The Government Gazette of 1832 lists Henry White arriving in Australia on the Portland and Earl St. Vincent convict transports. The Earl St. Vincent arrived in Hobart in 1826.

Henry White was employed as a surgeon in London. He was involved in the South Sea Company and was accused of forging signatures. His trial took place at the Old Bailey on 15th September 1825 and he pleaded guilty to the lesser of three charges of forging a signature of a witness and was sentenced to 7 years transportation  Select here to read the case at the Old Bailey

He was first sent to a government farm at Emu Plains and then as assistant surgeon to an expedition to Western Port. The Westernport Settlement was established on November 24th, 1826 and abandoned on February 27th, 1828.

His health suffered and when the Westernport settlement was abandoned he was sent to Port Stephens to be assigned to the Australian Agricultural Company.

He was at Port Stephens in the years 1830 - 1832 and referred to by Company Commissioner Sir Edward Parry as 'troublesome'. In February 1832 he was transferred to Mr. Cox in Maitland, possibly in exchange for William Whitelaw, and later that year returned to Port Stephens.

His sentenced ended in October 1832 and he entered private practice, settling eventually at Windsor. He married in November 1842 to Mary Ann Townshend, the daughter of a prominent landowner. He is said to have fought a duel with an army captain around this time.

He discovered rich load of copper in March 1845.

 

 

Notes & Links:

Other convict surgeons in the Hunter Valley included Patrick Montgomery, Henry Turner Harrington, John Waugh Drysdale, George Bridge Mullins, Thomas Parmeter, William Whitelaw and Henry White

British Medical Journal Volume 295 19 - 26 December 1987., Transported to New South Wales; medical convicts 1788-1850

 

 

 

 

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