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Newcastle 1822

Newspaper Extracts


The Sydney Gazette 25 January 1822

ESCAPEES FROM NEWCASTLE

The Undermentioned Prisoners having absented themselves from their respective Employments, and some of them at large with false Certificates, all Constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost Exertions in apprehending and lodging them in Custody

From Newcastle

Richard Bradburn, Charles Clifford, Patrick Tully, J. Thomson, Samuel

Radcliffe, Michael Magrath, Charles Launders, John Ladone, William Wood, Thomas Randall, J. Johnstone, J. Roberts, Henry Bell, Charles Lepis alias Edwards, Richard Beardsley, Charles Ryden, J. Whelan, J. McCarthy, James Topp, J. Boyd, James Mole.

MAJOR MORISSET'S HOSPITALITY

Mr. William Smith, of the First Public School, Sydney, in the name of the party lately from the Northward on the discovery of land, requests us to publicly convey the grateful thanks of the same party to Major Morisset, 48th Regiment, the Commandant at Newcastle, for the very kind reception, and comfortable accommodations, the abundant refreshments, and the able assistance afforded them in inspecting the branches of Hunter’s River.


The Sydney Gazette 1 February 1822

 

ESCAPEES FROM NEWCASTLE

The public advertisement of last week informed us, that upwards of 20 prisoners, of the most atrocious class, had made off into the woods from Newcastle; and by the arrival in the early part of this week of the Government vessel Newcastle from Port Macquarie, we learn that thirteen desperadoes very recently absconded from that settlement, carrying with them arms, ammunition etc. The same information states; that the Commandant, Captain Allman, 48th Regiment, promptly sent a party of military in pursuit, which was successful in retaking the whole of the gang, but not without bloodshed, one being severely wounded, and another shot dead; the name of the latter is White. Such means have been adopted consequent on this unfortunate transaction, as will probably prevent the recurrence of such a fruitless procedure for some time to come, at least. As to the lawless banditti from Newcastle, if they are not harboured or encouraged by the settlers in the out stations, they will not long go unapprehended. It is to be hoped that all will esteem it a public duty, of the greatest import, to strain every exertion to safely lodge those absentees once more in custody, as from their enlargement what can be expected but rapine, bloodshed, and murder? Surely no one, in possession of a glimmering of humanity, will afford protection to, or countenance, such determined characters.


The Sydney Gazette, 15 February 1822

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

The Undermentioned Prisoners having absented themselves from their respective Employments, and some of them at large with false Certificates, all Constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost Exertions in apprehending and lodging them in Custody

From Newcastle

H. Bell, Richard Beardsley, Charles Ryden, James Topp, J. Boyde, J. Richards, Charles Riley, Joseph Saunders, Francis Ewer, Hugh McGuire, D. Hennesy, James Holmes, Joseph Savage

 


 

The Sydney Gazette 8 March 1822

 

MAJOR MORISSET TO HEADQUARTERS BY BOAT

On Wednesday morning Major Morisset of the 48th Regiment, Commandant of His Majesty’s Settlement of Newcastle, arrived in Sydney Cove in an open boat, on a visit to head quarters. This Gentleman was only eleven hours on the water, having left Newcastle the previous evening.

SHIPPING

On Monday the brig Queen Charlotte, Captain Henry preparatory to her departure for the Society Isles, sailed on a trip to Newcastle.

 

CRIMINAL COURT

Sydney

Sarah Ward, guilty of stealing wearing apparel, the property of Mary Starkey sentenced to 3 years transportation.

Sarah Porter was indicted for stealing from Mr. Thomas Henry Hart in Pitt Street, a silver coin, value 3/-. The prisoner was detected in the act of taking the money from the drawer by Mrs. Hart, which she had opened by means of a skeleton key; this instrument was produced in Court. Her criminality being rendered thus undoubted, the prisoner was remanded for sentence. (The late mistress of this unhappy girl, whose parents are living in Sydney, previous to leaving the Court, was in the kind act of interceding for the prisoner, when a volley of petrifying abuse suddenly issued forth against Mrs. Hart, and the language was so truly horrible as to raise feelings of indignation in the minds of the Court, rather than those of mercy. The prisoner was withdrawn by force)

Elizabeth Finley (Finlay), guilty of receiving stolen property sentenced to three years transportation

Henrietta Bray was convicted of the following crime; the prisoner was a laundress, and had a quantity of cloths delivered to her in the professional way, which, instead of returning to the owner, she thought proper to sell, at a very low price. A good short was disposed of for two dumps. Her sentence was three years transportation. It is to be desired that this example will have a beneficial tendency.

Margaret Quinn found guilty of receiving stolen poultry and sentenced to twelve months transportation.

Edward Bedford, found guilty of an infamous assault was sentenced to seven years transportation

James Brooks and Cornelius Bye were indicted for stealing from King’s Wharf goods belonging to Gregory Blaxland valued at £60. Found guilty and sentenced to seven years transportation

Mathew Butler was found guilty of entering the dwelling of Elizabeth Peake and sentenced to seven years transportation

Peter Ryan was indicted for stealing two casks of port value £10, the property of Mr. Joseph Underwood; and John Kelly was also indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen. Found guilty and sentenced to 14 years transportation each.


 

The Sydney Gazette 29 March 1822

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

The Undermentioned Prisoners having absented themselves from employment and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody.

John Richards per Mariner; aged 32 years; Native Place Coventry; 5’ 6 ¼”; grey eyes, sandy hair; fair pale complexion; Absconded from Newcastle

Charles Spratt (Sprott) per Fanny; aged 22; Native of Ayrshire; 5’ 10 ½”; hazel eyes, black hair; fair pale complexion; absconded from Newcastle

Joseph Saunders per Baring; aged 30; Native of Herefordshire; 5’ 9 ½”; hazel eyes; black hair; dark sallow complexion; Absconded from Newcastle.

Francis Ewer per Ocean; aged 26; Native place London; 5’ 8”; grey eyes, dark sandy hair; fair ruddy complexion; absconded from Newcastle.


 

The Sydney Gazette 5 April 1822

PUNISHMENT OF JOHN GAHAGAN

John Gahagan sent twice to Newcastle previously. For attempting to bribe Superintendent of Convicts W. Hutchinson, sentenced to 100 lashes in the public market place.

 


The Sydney Gazette 3 May 1822

REWARD FOR CAPTURE OF  BUSHRANGER - SAMUEL MEDWORTH

Twenty Pounds Reward – Conditional Pardon. Whereas on Friday last, a Government Cart was stopped on the Liverpool road, by three ruffians who, in the most wanton and unprovoked manner shot with a blunderbuss, Stephen Woodcock, a Government Overseer in Charge of the same; A Reward of Twenty Pounds is hereby offered to any Free White Person who shall apprehend or give such information as may lead to the Apprehension of the Offenders; or, a Conditional pardon to any convict who shall perform the like Service. The Assassins are supposed to be the same who shot Hayes, in the House of Thomas Lewis in a short Time since

The following is their description:

1.     The man who fired the Blunderbuss, is about 5 ft 6 inches high, and had on a blue jacket

2.     A man about 6 feet high large brown whiskers and long visage; had on a pair of dark Parramatta blanket trowsers, smock   frock, and glazed hat; supposed to be Samuel Medwith, (Medworth) who was sent to Newcastle with Cunningham from Colonel Johnston’s Service

3.     A man rather above 5ft 6 inches high; had on a loose frock

 

The following articles were taken from the Cart; nine government blankets; one iron pot; one frying pan; one shovel; two suits of slops; three pairs of shoes; 20lbs of sugar; 1 lb of tea; 1 ½ lb of tobacco; half a gallon of rum; a certificate of freedom, for John Miller, per Ocean pasted on a piece of check very dirty; and a light drab coat belonging to the deceased Woodcock.


The Sydney Gazette 10 May 1822

PRICE OF COAL

Coals will be delivered on board Merchant vessels at Newcastle at 8/- the ton; the King’s dues on Exportation will be the same as those hitherto levied on home consumption.


 

The Sydney Gazette 24 May 1822

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

The Undermentioned Prisoners having absented themselves from employment and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody.

Charles Spratt per Fanny; 22 yrs old; native of Ayrshire; 5 ft 101/2 in; hazel eyes; black hair; fair pale complexion; absconded from Newcastle

Joseph Saunders per Baring (2); 30 yrs old; native of Herefordshire; 5ft 2 ½ in; hazel eyes; black hair; dark sallow complexion; absconded from Newcastle

J. Squires per Somersetshire; 28 years old; native of Cambridge; 6 ft 1 in; absconded from Newcastle

James Metcalfe per Atlas (4); 39 years old; native of Wakefield; 5 ft 4 in; hazel eyes; light hair; dark sallow complexion; absconded from Newcastle.


The Sydney Gazette 14 June 1822

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from employment and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody.

Joseph Mayer, per Baring (2); 30 yrs old; native of Biddulph; 5 ft 3 in; grey eyes; sandy hair; freckled complexion; absconded from Newcastle

Moses Prosser, per General Hewitt, 42 years old; Native of Kent; absconded from Newcastle

William Harper absconded from Newcastle

Patrick Laverty, per Guildford (2); 55 yrs old; Native of Antrim, 5ft 7 ½ in; grey eyes; grey hair; sallow complexion; absconded from Newcastle

George Bull, per Prince of Orange; 28 years old; Native of Tunbridge; 5ft 5 ¼ in; blue eyes; fair hair; florid complexion; absconded from Newcastle

William Brouce, per Prince of Orange; 21 years old; Native of Somersetshire; 5 ft 5 ¾ in; hazel eyes; brown hair; fair ruddy complexion; absconded from Newcastle

Joseph Powell, per Somersetshire; 27 years old; Native of Shrewsbury; absconded from Newcastle

Abraham Hewitt per Juliana; absconded from Newcastle

John Gough, per Marquis of Wellington; aged 30 years; black complexion; has been shot in the mouth and lost all his front teeth.

Any Persons harbouring concealing or maintaining any of the said Absentees will be prosecuted for the Offence.


 

The Sydney Gazette 12 July 1822

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from employment and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody.

Thomas Brooks per Grenada;

John Heyburn per Minerva;

John Creardon per Lord Sidmouth.

Taken a few days since being runaways from Newcastle which place they left about a fortnight since.

 


 

The Sydney Gazette 2 August 1822

ECLIPSE

There will be an eclipse of the sun visible all over the Colony on Saturday 17th August next.


 

The Sydney Gazette 16 August 1822

GOVERNMENT MEDICAL APPOINTMENTS

Government and General Orders

His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint until his Majesty’s Pleasure shall be known:

Francis Moran Esq. M.D. to be an assistant surgeon on the Colonial Medical Establishment of New South Wales vice assistant surgeon Evans who retires.

The Governor at the recommendation of Principal Surgeon is pleased to direct that assistant Surgeon Brooks shall proceed to take charge of Medical Duties at Newcastle, assistant surgeon Moran succeeding assistant surgeon Brooks in the Medical Duties at Sydney.


The Sydney Gazette 30 August 1822

Captain Welsh, owner of the brig Thalia, about three weeks since, was induced to visit Port Stevens, at which place the vessel is taking in cargo. He had been informed, from respectable authority, that spirits had been smuggled and drank in abundance, and that the crew had been permitted (through the mismanagement of the Commander) to mutiny in consequence. From those representations Captain Welsh dispensed with the further services of the Commander. But to his astonishment on his arrival at Port Stevens he found that the crew were at their required and usual labour and no appearance of drunkenness; but on the contrary they had been actively engaged in their duty. Captain Welsh has received a letter from the chief officer and crew, which he has forwarded for publication. Upon a perusal, the Reader will perceive that another victim is to be added to misrepresentation in the person of Mr. Garrett. When will calumnies cease?

Port Stevens 1st August 1822

“We, the crew of the brig Thalia cannot but express our astonishment and surprise at the malicious reports that have been circulated to the great prejudice of Capt. Garrett. We, at the same time, declare we are at a loss to find out on what grounds such reports could have been framed; and conceive, that the person who has sent them forth into the world, could have no other intention than to secretly attempt Capt. Garrett’s ruin, to promote his own views; for he cannot, in any way, publicly declare that Captain G.’s conduct to us deserved such aspersions. We know nothing of any serious quarrels, at any time, between Captain Garrett and ourselves at Newcastle or elsewhere; some trifling altercation between Captain Garrett and the cook excepted, in which the latter acknowledged he was in fault. We know nothing of Captain Garrett having split the cook’s skull open, or having hurt him in any wise; and, with regard to ourselves, we have not neither had any reason to complain of ill usage, or occasion to murmur for want of provisions since Captain Garrett joined the Thalia; and to the truth of which we, the undersigned are ready to make oath, if required.

Thomas Oakley, William Verrill, Thomas Dillon, W.R. Boyce, R. Janeway, J. Harris, George Johnson, Thomas Elliott, G. Farris, (cook), M. Morison, James Corlett, J. Hastings, W. Blackmore, J. Scallan (Chief Mate)  


 

            

The Sydney Gazette 20 September 1822

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from employment and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody.

From Newcastle  –

Thomas Digby per Fortune (1813);

Henry Collins (Collings) per Fortune (1813);

William Harper per Indefatigable; aged 70; native of Kent

 

WRECK

The following strange and lamentable circumstance was forwarded to us from Newcastle for insertion;

‘During the heavy gale that blew from the south west quarter on Sunday evening about five o’clock an open boat was discovered making for this harbour having on board apparently no more than two men. In her endeavour to enter the inner passage the violence of the surf upset her and the two men perished. The boat has been recovered. On her stern she has a board with ‘Magnet, Thomas Wilson 67’ marked on it.

 

 

The Sydney Gazette 28 September 1822

WRECK

We are enabled to explain the seeming mystery that enveloped the article from Newcastle inserted in the last Gazette. About 14 days since, perhaps 3 weeks (or so goes our information), two men, viz Thomas Wilson, the owner of the boat in question and one John King left Cockle Bay for the Five Island; but owing to the strong westerly and South Westerly winds were driven away to the northward; and in endeavouring to gain Hunter River as has been unfortunately related, the boat overturned and the two poor men were consigned to a watery grave.

 

CRIMINAL COURT

Peter George, a foreigner, was indicted for stealing sundry items of wearing apparel, the property of John King. Guilty.

 

 

The Sydney Gazette 11 October 1822

MAJOR MORISSET TO HEADQUARTERS

Major Morisset of the 48th Regiment, Commandant of the settlement at Newcastle this week paid a visit to Head Quarters in his barge. This gentleman will return to his government in a few days.

 

PARSONAGE ROBBED

On the 24th ult. in the absence of the Reverend Mr. Middleton from Newcastle, the parsonage house was broken into and plundered of wearing apparel and other property to a considerable amount exclusive of a large quantity of dollars. The thieves eluded detection up to the last arrival from the settlement but yet there are some hopes entertained of bringing the offenders to justice.

 

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from employment and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody.

Thomas Digby per Fortune

Henry Collins per Fortune

John Stone per Tottenham, aged 31; native of Nottingham; 5’4”, blue eyes, brown hair, dark sallow complexion.

Isaac Patterson per Dromedary, aged 26; native of London; 5’6”, hazel eyes, sandy hair, sallow complexion.

 

HARBOURING BUSHRANGERS

George Mollison, A settler at Hawkesbury was indicted for harbouring, encouraging and maintaining bushrangers the whole of whom had been convicted for felony at the present sitting of Court. The prisoner was found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years transportation.

BURGLARY

Christiana Young was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling house of Joseph Tuzo. Found guilty and remanded.

ASSAULT

John Kable and Charles Kable were next found guilty of an outrageous assault upon the Windsor Police and sentenced to twelve months transportation to Newcastle.

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

Charles Spratt, John Antonio, Henry Bridge, Daniel Clarke, Felix Patshaw, Thomas Dwyer, George Hasler, and Thomas Till were indicted for stealing a whale boat, the property of the Crown, from the Settlement of Port Macquarie; and John Doyle, for aiding assisting in the felony. The prisoners had been either sent from Head quarters to Port Macquarie or from Hunter’ River (Newcastle) to that Settlement; which fact, together with that of absconding on the night of the 25th August in a whale boat, was clearly proved. In substantiation of this crime we hasten to given the evidence of the approver Michael Doras; who, after solemn admonition from His Honour the Judge Advocate, proceeded to state as follows: He said he was one of those that effected their escape from Port Macquarie in the boat; that the design had been planned, at the instance of the prisoner Daniel Clarke, about three months before; in whom was vested the title and authority of Captain. It was the intention of the commander to make Cape Barren, and then to increase the size of the ship, by rising upon her. Three weeks provisions had been provided for the voyage; and, till the evening of departure arrived, the oars etc were secreted on the premises of the prisoner, John Doyle. Being prepared, they put to sea viz the eight prisoners at the bar, Spratt, Antonio, Bridge, Clarke, Patshaw, Dwyer, Hasler and Till; leaving in their haste to set off the latter prisoner Doyle behind. The number that had designed to embark upon this wretched expedition amounted to twenty-five about 15 being fortunately unprepared. The sail was manufactured from a hammock and two blankets. About two in the morning the little barque got into the offing. When about 25 miles from Port Macquarie it came on to blow, and the boat was upset; by this disaster nearly all the provisions were lost. The boat being guilty of lightwood soon became righted and the voyagers put into land, where they remained till morning. They were compelled to mount the vessel upon their shoulders and carry her for three miles along the beach ere they could venture into the ocean again. In the evening they made the land as the captain thought it most prudent to got coastwise. Upon this occasion they had to cast anchor, it being impracticable to land on account of the natives, where they were confined for three days owing to a north west gale. After this Port Stevens was made, in which place 2 days passed away; from thence they glided by Newcastle, and reached Broken Bay in safety, nearly starved. The prisoner till then advised, as he knew a settler of the Hawkesbury River, to make for that only haven, in order to procure provisions and other articles to facilitate the primary object of reaching Cape Barren. – Having brought the prisoners Doyle excepted, safe among the farm houses upon the Banks of Hawkesbury it is necessary to say, that some of the party became terrified with the dangers just escaped, and the privations endured, and burnt the vessel – the captain’s only hope; and thus all expectation of effecting a further escape vanished. Some of the prisoners were apprehended, while others more prudently surrendered. – Notwithstanding the fact stated by the approver, and corroborated by a cloud of other testimony, two of the prisoners viz Dwyer and Hasler, wished to persuade the Court that they had actually walked from Port Macquarie!

The whole of the above prisoners together with a man named John Finlay, were also charged upon a second count in the indictment, with feloniously entering the dwelling house of Mr. Andrew Clink, settler at Portland head upon the 3rd of September. Upon this charge all the prisoners were found not guilty. Upon the first count in the information the prisoners were adjudged guilty. Remanded


 

The Sydney Gazette 25 October 1822

ABSCONDING PRISONERS

The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from employment and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody. From Newcastle:

John Stone per Larkins; aged 20; native of Nottingham; 5’9”, Government servant to Miss Walsh

Alexander Shaw per Sir William Bensley; aged 23; native of the Isle of Mull; 5’5”, ruddy complexion

Samuel Evans per Coromandel; aged 21; native of Liverpool; 5’6”; hazel eyes, brown hair

Joseph Slater per Baring; aged 21; native of Birmingham; 5’6”

Thomas Davis per Fortune