Home Gov. Macquarie to Newcastle 1818 Colonial Events 1812



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Governor Macquarie's Visit

 

Newcastle 1812

 

 

Governor Lachlan Macquarie kept a Journal which can be read at Journeys in Time.....(The Original is held in Mitchell Library, Sydney. [ML Ref: A777])

In 1811 Governor Macquarie embarked on a voyage to inspect distant settlements. He first sailed to Hobart on the Lady Nelson, then an overland journey to Port Dalrymple; a voyage to Port Stephens followed and then to Newcastle where they arrived on 3rd January.  Governor Macquarie's Journal for this voyage begins in Sydney on 4th November 1811.

Also accompanying the Governor was his wife Elizabeth Macquarie, Captain Henry Antill, Lieut. John Maclaine (Macquarie's cousin/nephew), and Acting Surveyor-General James Meehan.

Bryan Overhand was Master of the Lady Nelson.

The 1st of January 1812 was spent in Port Stephens and on Friday 3rd January 1812 the Lady Nelson entered Newcastle harbour.

Lieutenant Thomas Skottowe of the 73rd regiment was in Command of the Newcastle Settlement in January 1812.

Governor Macquarie described in his journal their arrival in Newcastle.......At 11 a.m. Mrs. M. & myself with the Gentlemen of our Family set out in the Ship's Boat for Newcastle -- leaving the Vessel to follow us, being still between 2 & 3 miles from the Shore. We rowed in through the Channel formed by the main Land and Nobby's (or Coal) Island, and landed at the Settlement of Newcastle at 1/2 past 1 o'clock; Lieut. Skottowe the Commandant having received us on the Govt. Wharf from whence we proceeded to the Government House. ---I issued General Orders immediately on my landing respecting the inspection of the Settlement. ---I then went with Mrs. M. &c. to view the Coal mines, and took afterwards a long walk along the Beach and over the Hills in the vicinity of the Town and through the Town itself. ---Soon after the Lady Nelson had come in and anchored in the Harbour, we returned on board again, Lt. Skottowe accompanying us to Dinner. ---

He issued the following Government Order on Friday 3rd January 1812 -

Government and General Orders

Headquarters at Newcastle, in Hunter's River

Friday 3rd January 1812

His Excellency the Governor and Com'r of the Forces will inspect the detachment of the 73rd Reg't at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning on their usual place of parade. At 10 o'clock he will inspect the whole of the male and female convicts now present at Newcastle who are accordingly to be paraded in some convenient place for that purpose by their respective overseers; and the Governor hopes to see the whole of them clean and properly dressed on this occasion.

The Governor will immediately afterwards inspect the barracks of the soldiers, the provision stores, and the quarters and gardens of the convicts.

His Excellency, the Governor directs that tomorrow shall be considered as a holiday, and that the convicts shall be exempted from labour during the whole of the day.

His Excellency is further pleased to direct that an extra ration of one pounds and a half of fresh beef shall be served out tomorrow to each non-com officer and soldier of the 73rd Reg't and male convict in the settlement of Newcastle with the usual proportion to all the women and children.

His Excellency the Governor will proceed at one o'clock this day to inspect the Coal mines and Lime kilns at and in the vicinity of the settlement.....L. Macquarie.(1)

The Sydney Gazette later gave the following account:

From Port Stephens the Governor proceeded to Newcastle, where he viewed the Coal Mines, and those parts of the river where Lime is made. Proceeding to the first branch, at the distance of twenty miles from the Town, he was much gratified to find that this useful Settlement, already furnishing the colony with Cedar, Coals and Lime, also promises from the fertility of the soil higher up the River, to provided for the increasing Population of the Country, being fit for the purposes of Agriculture and Grazing.

On Sunday the 5th January 1812, the governor departed from Newcastle on his Return to Sydney, and arrived here on the following day, a highly gratified with his tour, and with the hope of deriving considerable advantage from the local knowledge he has thus obtained of the different subordinate settlements, since his departure from the Seat of Government.

They arrived in Sydney on 6th January 1812.

Following is a list of some of the many convicts who may have stood before Governor Macquarie at Newcastle in January 1812. .....

Male Prisoners.....
 
Charles Adams sent to Newcastle for 1 year in October 1811
 
James Ahern, Herbert Stiles and Hugh Maclean all arrived on the Eagle in 1811. They were sent to Newcastle to be employed in government work in February 1811
 
John Anson a lime burner, probably arrived on the Royal Admiral in 1800 was sent to Newcastle in August 1810
 
Garrett Armstrong arrived as a soldier of the NSW Corps on the Recovery in 1808. He was sent to Newcastle July 1811.
 
Edward Barnes, arrived on the Glatton in 1803. William Cairney, Edward Barnes, John McDonald, Dominic McEnire and James Maxwell were considered the principal leaders in a conspiracy to stealing the vessel Aurora and all were sent to Newcastle for 3 years to be kept at hard labour
 
Thomas Berry per Admiral Gambier sent in November 1811
 
Joseph Bonham arrived on the Indian. He was sent to Newcastle for two years in May 1811 for repeatedly robbing his master John Thomas Campbell. Later John Campbell petitioned for Bonham to be returned to Sydney.
 
John Brearly was tried in Lancaster in 1800 and arrived on the Earl Cornwallis in 1801. He was a miner and was first sent to Newcastle in April 1804.
 
Richard Brown arrived on the Providence in 1811. Sent to Newcastle for 1 year in October 1811
 
John Bryan sent in February 1811 sent to the coal mines. Served his sentence in June 1812 and was permitted to return to Sydney
 
John Burgess absconded from Newcastle with John Brearly in 1810 and was returned to Newcastle in August 1810
 
William Cairney was sent to Newcastle in October 1810 having been found guilty of being involved in conspiracy to steal the vessel Aurora. He absconded and was returned to Newcastle in February 1811. William Cairney, Edward Barnes, John McDonald, Dominic McEntire and James Maxwell were considered the principal leaders in a conspiracy to stealing the vessel Aurora and all were sent to Newcastle for 3 years to be kept at hard labour.
 
Thomas Camel per Duke of Portland sent to Newcastle for three years in November 1811
 
James Camm arrived on the Coromandel in 1804. He was sent to Newcastle in July 1811. In September 1811 Thomas Coyne, Joseph Rayfield, John Baker, James Camm and John Pierce were each punished with 48 lashes for running away from the lime burners and taking a boat from along side the Resource. He was punished again in 1812 for theft.
 
Edmond Castello, Felix McKenna, Thomas Copean, Carman Reago,  Felix Paitcho and Benjamin Grimshaw who had all been court-martialled and arrived on the Indian were to be sent to Newcastle in December 1810 but to receive no harsh treatment while there.
 
James Condon arrived on the Boyd in 1809. Sent to Newcastle in February 1811 to work in the coal mines
 
Thomas Copean, Felix McKenna, Carman Reago, Edmond Castello, Felix Paitcho and Benjamin Grimshaw who had all been court-martialled and arrived on the Indian were to be sent to Newcastle in December 1810 but to receive no harsh treatment while there.
 
William Cornwallis per Pegasus (free man) sent to Newcastle 1811 for 3 years
 
Thomas Coyne. Came free on the Anne in 1801 as a soldier of the NSW Corps. Sent to Newcastle in February 1811. (In September 1811 Thomas Coyne, Joseph Rayfield, John Baker, James Camm and John Pierce were punished with 48 lashes each for running away from the lime burners and taking a boat from along side the Resource)
 
Owen Divine per Minorca sent to Newcastle September 1811 to be kept at hard labour
 
Hugh Devlyn arrived on the Friendship sent to Newcastle in September 1811 for Life
 
Patrick Ducey arrived on the Atlas. Sent to work in the coal mines for one year they having been sentenced to hard labour for fraudulently obtaining certificates of freedom February 1811
 
Hugh Duffy per Rolla sent to Newcastle for receiving goods stolen from Thomas Abbott. Sent for 2 years in February 1811.
 
Anthony Dwyer was tried in Cashel and arrived on the Atlas in 1802. He was overseer of the lime burners and was sent to Newcastle in July 1810 when the lime kilns were newly constructed. He was one of the early settlers at Patterson's Plains.
 
Edward Edwards arrived on the Indian in 1810. He was sent to Newcastle in May 1811. By June 1812 he had served his sentence at Newcastle but was to remain in the settlement. He was acquainted with James Hardy Vaux
 
John Fitzgerald who arrived on the Anne in 1801 was first sent to Newcastle in 1806. He absconded many times and was in the hospital there when Governor Macquarie visited.
 
William Fitzgerald per Duke of Portland. Sent to Newcastle in July 1811. On the list of runaways in April 1812
 
Michael Fitzpatrick per Royal Admiral. Sent to Newcastle in July 1811. He was discharged from Newcastle in January 1814, his sentence having expired.
 
John Fitzwilliam per Royal Admiral sent to Newcastle in October for 3 years
 
James Frazer/ Frazier a soldier of the 73rd regiment who arrived on the Hindostan in 1809. Sentenced to 7 years hard labour for stealing clothes belonging to the Crown. Sent to Newcastle in February 1811. His children were among the pupils at the first school in Newcastle in 1816
 
Thomas Gorman alias Thomas Martin arrived on the Rolla in 1803. Sent to work in the coal mines for one year in February 1811 for fraudulently obtaining certificates of freedom.
 
William Gorman per Atlas 1802. Sent to Newcastle in July 1811. Punished with 50 lashes in April 1812 for selling his slops.
 
George Greaves arrived on the Boyd in 1809. He was sent to Newcastle in July 1811.
 
Benjamin Grimshaw, Thomas Copean, Carman Reago, Edmond Castello and Felix Paitcho  who had all been court-martialled and arrived on the Indian were to be sent to Newcastle in December 1810 but to receive no harsh treatment while there.
 
Samuel Hogg was sentenced to 7 years transportation in 1804 at Lancaster for stealing calico from a wagon. He arrived on the Fortune in 1806. He was sent to Newcastle on the Lady Nelson early in 1810 but with two others James Ratty and Edward Tobin, escaped en route. Hogg and Tobin surrendered themselves and were returned to Newcastle in July 1810. Samuel Hogg was apprehended with two others and returned to Newcastle in November 1811. Hogg drowned in the Hunter River in 1814.
 
Robert Johnson sent to Newcastle for one year in October 1811
 
Thomas Johnson sent in February 1811 - to be worked in the coal mines until further orders. Johnson was a free man who arrived as boatswain on the Indian until convicted at the criminal court of theft and sentenced to three years hard labour.
 
Francis Jones. Sent to Newcastle in July 1811
 
Henry Joice/ Joyce arrived on the Admiral Gambier in 1808. He was sent to Newcastle in May 1811. Being a very bad character he was to be employed in hard labour
 
Joel Josephs arrived per Indian. He was sent to Newcastle in July 1811;
 
Robert (?James) Kelly sent in February 1811 to work in the coal mines. By June 1812 he had served his sentence at Newcastle but was to remain in the settlement
 
Henry Kennedy per Anne sent in February 1810 considered a most undeserving prisoner and was still in Newcastle in 1816.
 
Francis Lawless arrived on the Boyd in 1809. Occupation bricklayer. Sent to replace Edward Young at the lime burners in February 1811. Returned to Sydney in February 1812.
 
Charles Lee. Sent to Newcastle in July 1811
 
Hugh Maclean, Herbert Stiles and James Ahern  all arrived on the Eagle in 1811. They were sent to Newcastle to be employed in government work in February 1811
 
Morgan Maloney per Boyd sent to Newcastle in November 1811
 
James Maxwell. William Cairney, Edward Barnes, John McDonald, Dominic McEnire and James Maxwell were considered the principal leaders in a conspiracy to stealing the vessel Aurora and all were sent to Newcastle for 3 years to be kept at hard labour.
 
John McCabe probably arrived on the  Tellicherry. He was sent to Newcastle in July 1811
 
John McDonald. William Cairney, Edward Barnes, John McDonald, Dominic McEnire and James Maxwell were considered the principal leaders in a conspiracy to stealing the vessel Aurora and all were sent to Newcastle for 3 years to be kept at hard labour.
 
Dominic McEntire/ McEnteer arrived on the Boyd in 1809; and William Cairney, Edward Barnes, John McDonald, Dominic McEnire and James Maxwell were considered the principal leaders in a conspiracy to stealing the vessel Aurora and all were sent to Newcastle for 3 years to be kept at hard labour.
 
Felix McKenna, Thomas Copean, Carman Reago, Edmond Castello, Felix Paitcho and Benjamin Grimshaw who had all been court-martialled and arrived on the Indian were to be sent to Newcastle in December 1810 but to receive no harsh treatment while there.
 
Joseph McKinley arrived on the Minerva 1800. Sent for three years July 1811
 
Michael (?Matthew) McMahon sent in February 1811 to work in the coal mines
 
Felix Paitcho, Thomas Copean, Carman Reago, Edmond Castello  and Benjamin Grimshaw who had all been court-martialled and arrived on the Indian were to be sent to Newcastle in December 1810 but to receive no harsh treatment while there.
 
James Pearce. By June 1812 he had served his sentence at Newcastle but was to remain in the settlement
 
John Pierce arrived on the Indian. Sent to Newcastle in July 1811 (In September 1811 Thomas Coyne, Joseph Rayfield, John Baker, James Camm and John Pierce punished with 48 lashes each for running away from the lime burners and taking a boat from along side the Resource;)
 
Benjamin Porter, a miner transported on the Duke of Portland in 1807. He was sent to Newcastle in September 1810. In February 1811 he was in Sydney for medical treatment and while there made a complaint to Governor Macquarie of the cruel treatment he endured at Newcastle. He was still in Newcastle in 1815.
 
Samuel Price probably arrived on the Indian in 1810. He was sent to Newcastle in May 1811. Being a very bad character he was to be employed in hard labour. He was punished with fifty lashesat Newcastle on 2nd January 1812 for stealing while at the lime burners.
 
Joseph Rayfield (Raphael) who arrived in the Calcutta in 1803 was sent to Newcastle in February 1811. In September 1811 Thomas Coyne, Joseph Rayfield, John Baker, James Camm and John Pierce were each punished with 48 lashes  for running away from the lime burners and taking a boat from along side the Resource.
 
Carman Reago, Felix McKenna, Thomas Copean, Edmond Castello, Felix Paitcho and Benjamin Grimshaw who had all been court-martialled and arrived on the Indian were to be sent to Newcastle in December 1810 but to receive no harsh treatment while there.
 
William Saunders per Boyd sent to Newcastle in December 1811
 
John Shea. Soldier of the 73rd regiment. Sent to Newcastle in July 1811 for the murder of William Maher at Norfolk Island.
 
Neal Smith/Smythe arrived on the Atlas in 1802. He was sent to Newcastle in the aftermath of the rebellion at Castle Hill in 1804. In 1811 he claimed that his sentence had expired, however Commandant John Purcell did not recommend that he be sent back to Sydney as he was 'one of the worst characters in the colony'.
 
Herbert Stiles/ Styles, James Ahern and Hugh Maclean all arrived on the Eagle in 1811. They were sent to Newcastle to be employed in government work in February 1811. Mentioned as being a very designing man at Newcastle who intended to steal a boat and escape.  Lieut Skottowe advised to keep a close watch on him - Sent to Newcastle in October 1811. With three other men, Herbert Styles absconded from Newcastle on the Speedwell in 1814. Select here to find out more.
 
Ralph Summers arrived per Canada sent to Newcastle in August 1811 for 7 years
 
Edward Tobin was tried in London. He arrived on the Anne in February 1810 and was sent to Newcastle on the Lady Nelson. He absconded with James Ratty and Samuel Hogg en route however surrendered himself and was returned to Newcastle in July 1810.
 
Lawrence Townshend per Tellicherry. Sent to Newcastle in July 1811
 
James Hardy Vaux was sent in May 1811. Being a very bad character he was to be employed in hard labour
 
Robert Whitmore who arrived on the Royal Admiral in 1792 was sent to Newcastle in February 1811. He had been Master of the vessel 'Chance' and was committed for trial after being accused by Henry Kable junior of having embezzled 280lbs of salt port out of 6 casks that were put on board on freight and taken to the Hawkesbury, where the deficit was discovered. He was sentenced to 7 years transportation. In 1817 he was employed as pilot at Newcastle. He was one of the early settlers at Patterson's Plains.
 
Henry Williams who had been sentenced to death in 1809, reprieved and sent to Newcastle. He absconded and was returned in February 1811. Still in the settlement in May 1812 claiming expiration of sentence

 

 
Female Prisoners......
 
Mary Budman per Mary Anne sent for 1 year in November 1811
 
Ann Butcher per Sydney Cove sent to Newcastle in December 1811
 
Hannah Chappel per Speke 1808. Sent in July 1811
 
Mary Donnelly arrived per Tellicherry sent to Newcastle August 1811 for 1 year
 
Catherine Fahey per Marquis Cornwallis. Sent to Newcastle in September 1811 for 12 months
 
Norah/ Honorah Fahey arrived per Providence sent to Newcastle in September 1811 for 12 months
 
Eleanor McGrath/McGraw sent to Newcastle in July 1811
 
Mary McLean per Experiment sent in December 1811
 
Anne Malkins per Canada sent to Newcastle September 1811 to be kept at hard labour
 
Hannah Porter arrived per Canada in 1810. Sent to Newcastle in September for 4 months
 
Margaret Skinner per Indispensable sent to Newcastle in October 1811
 
Elizabeth Wheary per Speke sent for 1 year in November 1811

 

 

Notes & Links:

Thomas Britiffe Skottowe was born c. 1787 in France, the son of Lydia Pococke and Thomas Britiffe Skottowe. Find out more about the ancestors and descendants of Thomas Britiffe Skottowe here

 

 

References:

(1) Governor Macquarie's' first visit to Newcastle 1812 - Historical Records of New South Wales, vol. VII, p. 486

Colonial Secretary Correspondence Image No: (NRS 936) Copies of letters sent to Van Diemenīs Land, Newcastle and Norfolk Island, 1810-1813 (Ancestry)

 

 

 

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