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Convict Ship Pyramus 1836

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A B C D E F G H I
                 
J -K L M N - O P - Q R S T - V W - Y



Embarked: 120 women
Voyage: 116 days
Deaths: 0
Surgeon's Journal: Yes
Previous vessel Bengal Merchant arrived 9 December 1836
Next vessel Earl Grey arrived 31 December 1836
Captain George Nanthaniel Livesay
Surgeon Superintendent Obadiah Pineo

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The Pyramus was built at Sunderland in 1822.  Convicts were transported to New South Wales on the Pyramus in 1832 and 1836 and to Van Diemen's Land in 1838.

The Pyramus was the next convict ship to leave Ireland for New South Wales after the departure of the Captain Cook in July 1836 and the next convict ship bringing female prisoners from Ireland after the Thomas Harrison departed in February 1836.

One hundred and twenty female convicts and 31 children belonging to them were conveyed by the Waterloo Steamer to the Pyramus convict ship at Cove from the penitentiary in Cork on 23rd August 1836. Besides these there were eight women and 21 children who were all considered free settlers, and were wives and children of prisoners already in New South Wales. (1)

The Pyramus departed Cork on 20th August 1836.

Obadiah Pineo kept a Medical Journal from 23 July 1836 to 29 December 1836.......

He referred to the females on the Pyramus as exceedingly troublesome, but not half so hardened as many of the Englishwomen brought out. He was kept busy in preventing the women from quarrelling and in maintaining their health. Most of them were young and healthy, some were middle aged but none were old. One of the infants accompanying a convict mother died and another was born on the voyage.

Many women left children behind in Ireland. The following women brought their children with them........

Elizabeth Lawless (1 child) Mary Linehan (2 children) Marcella Mite ( 1 child)
Mary Ryan (2 children) Judith Shea ( 1 child) Margaret McKergan ( 3 children)
Judith Deering (3 children) Mary Driscoll (1 child) Sally Durkin ( 1 child)
Mary Moyles (1 child) Ann Flood (2 children) Celia Ward ( 1 child)
Catherine Carty (1 child) Maria Johnson (1 child) Mary Sullivan ( 1 child)
Ellen Gordon (2 children) Mary Prestage ( 1 child) Mary Cox ( 1 child)
Bridget Doherty ( 2 children) Catherine McGowan (2 children) Mary McNamara ( 1 child)
Mary Christie ( 1 child) Edith O'Neill ( 1 child) Eliza Molloy ( 2 children)
Bridget McMahon ( 5 children)    

The women were kept on deck all day with the exception of the two schools which the children were encouraged to attend. Obadiah Pineo thought that the Irish learned quickly and 'much may be done with them by way of management and a little coercion' and were less hardened in crime than the English or Scottish.

There was not even one case of scurvy. Keeping the prisoners on deck all day and using chloride of lime and alternately vinegar was considered useful in keeping the women in good health. The voyage took 116 days and they arrived in Port Jackson on 14th December 1836.

Their first Christmas in Australia was celebrated on board as they weren't landed until Monday morning 26th December when they were assigned to the various applicants.

Many women had relatives either on board with them or already in the colony. The following information is from the Remarks column in the convict indents:

Eliza Tully or Carr and Sarah Tully were sisters, both on board
Ann Whelan - Husband Patrick Byrne came out about 5 years previously; Elizabeth Hanlon came per Roslin Castle in 1836
Jane or Bridget McMahon - Brothers John McManus came 4 years previously and Edward McManus about 3 years previously
Ellen Gordon or McLally - Husband Roger Gordon or Duffey came per Captain Cook in 1836
Catherine Clarke - Husband Richard Murphy in 1833; Brother Thomas Clark in 1835
Honora Shea - Son Daniel Shea in 1836; daughters Judith or Mary Shea and Margaret Shea both on board the Pyramus
Judith Coakley - Sister of Denis Coakley
Mary Driscoll - Husband Cornelius Driscoll came 6 years previously; Mother Mary Walsh and Sister Ellen Walsh arrived 6 years previously
Catherine Dignum - John Dignum about 3 years previously
Mary Rooney - Brothers Christopher Rooney 4 years previously and John Rooney 6 years previously
Ellen Corcoran - Husband William Corcoran five years ago
Ann Floyd - Husband Matthew Wilkinson came per Waterloo in 1836; Sister Bridget Daly in 1836
Sally Durkin - Husband Patrick Durkin convicted at the same time
Celia Ward - Husband James Ward convicted at the same time
Margaret Cullen and Mary Cullen both on board; Sister Ann Cullen came 3 years previously
Ann Hagan - Sister Mary Hay arrived 4 years previously
Catherine Shaw -  Brother John Scan or O'Donnell 6 years previously; husband John Shaw came per Captain Cook in 1836
Bridget Smyth - Sister Ellen Riley and Mary Mustard arrived 5 years previously
Bridget Doherty - 1st husband Patrick Gallagher came about 5 years previously
Edith O'Neill - Sisters Mary and Anne James came about 6 years previously

On disembarking, thirty one women were forwarded on the Steamer Tamar to Newcastle. See below for the names of those sent directly to Newcastle.  Select here to find out what happened to some of the women who were  later sent to Newcastle and the Hunter Valley.

Obadiah Pineo was about fifty-nine years old on this voyage. His first appointment as Surgeon Superintendent on a convict ship was on the England which arrived in Port Jackson on 28 September 1835. He returned to London on the Norfolk in February 1836 and embarked on this voyage of the Pyramus. He returned to England and joined the Lord Lyndoch in April 1838. Select here to find out more about Obadiah Pineo.

The Sydney Gazette reported that the Pyramus was to depart Sydney in January/February for New Zealand to take in spars at Hokianga for London.   Rev. Frederick Wilkinson and family took their passage on the Pyramus. They returned to New South Wales on the Margaret in 1839.


Notes & Links:

1). Belfast Quarter Sessions - Tuesday - Elizabeth Gafney, for stealing a cloth waistcoat, on 1st May, the property of Jane Gordon at Belfast. Guilty; to be transported for seven years. The prisoner has been twelve times on the Police Books. - Belfast Newsletter 14 July 1835.

2). The Pyramus was one of five convict ships transporting female prisoners to New South Wales in the year 1836, the others being the Roslin Castle, Thomas Harrison, Elizabeth and Henry Wellesley. . A total of 668 female prisoners arrived in the colony in 1836.

3). Captain George Livesay had previously commanded the convict ship George Hibbert in 1834.

4). A List of women who were sent from the Pyramus directly to Newcastle Gaol arriving there on 27th December 1836.......
 
Catherine Anderson
Servant from Dublin. Assigned to Henry Didsbury at Newcastle on 29th December 1836.
 
Bridget Burke
Servant from Galway. Assigned to James Reid at Newcastle on 29th December 1836
 
Ellen Curtis
Servant from Dublin. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27th December 1836
 
Judith Coakley
Servant from Cork. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836
 
Judith Cuffe
Servant from Dublin. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836
 
Mary Anne Collins
Servant from Dublin. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836. Assigned to W. Dutton of Maitland on 30th December 1836
 
Catherine Carmody
Servant from Tipperary. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836
 
Margaret Cullen
Servant from Dublin. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836
 
Mary Christy alias Smith
Servant from Tyrone. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836
 
Mary Ann Donaldson
Servant from Edinburgh. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836. Assigned to Rev. Wilton at Newcastle on 29th December 1836.
 
Judith Deering
Servant from Carlow. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836.
Mary Driscoll
Servant from Cork. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836
 
Eliza Doherty
Servant from Donegal. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836. Assigned to Lieutenant Jonathan Warner at Lake Macquarie on 29th December 1836.
 
Catherine Dignam
Servant from Dublin. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836
 
Margaret Davidson
Servant from Dublin. Sent to Newcastle gaol for assignment on 27 December 1836. Assigned to Morpeth area on 2nd January 1837
 
Margaret Devine
Servant from King's County. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to Mrs. James Reid at Newcastle 2nd January 1837
 
Ann Floyd
Servant from Co Clare. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to Edward Denny Day at Maitland on 2nd January 1837
 
Julia Murphy
Servant from Limerick. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to Rev. L. Threlkeld at Lake Macquarie on 31 December 1836
 
Honora Buckley.
From Co. Kerry. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to H.C. Semphill on 29 December 1836
 
Mary Donnelly
From Co. Caven. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to Mrs. Radford at Newcastle on 28th December 1836
 
Ellen Corcoran
From Cork. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment.
 
Rachael Alexander
From Co Armagh. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment
 
Susan Connolly
From Dublin. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to J.H. Crummer, Police Magistrate at Newcastle 31 December 1837
 
Mary Cullen
From Kilkenny. Admitted to Newcastle for assignment.
 
Mary Cox or Connolly
From Co. Mayo. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to John Thomas at Newcastle on 28 December 1836
 
Mary Cleary
From Tipperary. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment.
 
Anne Dunn
From Tipperary. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment
 
Mary Halleran
From Limerick. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to Col. Henry Dumaresq on 30th December 1836
 
Marcella Mite
From Kings Co., Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment
 
Sarah Perkins
From the Isle of Man. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to John Smith at Newcastle on 28th December 1836
 
Bridget Smith (Smyth)
From Caven. Admitted to Newcastle gaol for assignment. Assigned to George Wyndham at Hunters River on 6th January 1837
 

5). Lucy Cooper (an Australian Tale) attributed to John Lang,  first appeared as a serial in Sharpe’s London Magazine in 1846. It is a tale about a convict girl with the fictional name of Lucy Cooper who was said to have arrived on the Pyramus in 1836.  Lucy Cooper was the first novel written by an Australian native born author. More about John Lang at the Australian Dictionary of Biography

Lucy Cooper - An Australian Tale - Chapter 1...........

 
   

 Click on text above to continue Chapter 1 or select from the links below for the next chapters......

Lucy Cooper - An Australian Tale - Chapter II

Lucy Cooper - An Australian Tale - Chapter III

Lucy Cooper - An Australian Tale - Chapter IV

Lucy Cooper - An Australian Tale - Chapter V

 

6). Click on the text below to read the evidence of Rev. Frederick Wilkinson before the select committee to report on the present state of the Islands of New Zealand published 1838....

 

 References:

(1). Kerry Evening Post 24 August 1836 page 4






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