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CONVICT SHIP ALEXANDER 1816
 

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Embarked: 84 women
Voyage: 152 days
Deaths 3
Surgeon's Journal: no
Previous vessel: Ocean arrived 30 January 1816
Next vessel: Guildford arrived 8 April 1816
Master William Hamilton  
Surgeon Superintendent John W. Hallion

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The Alexander was the next convict ship to leave Ireland after the Francis & Eliza and the Canada departed in December 1814. The Alexander departed Ireland on 4th November 1815, sailed via Rio de Janeiro and arrived in Sydney on 4 April 1816

Three women died on the passage out. - Margaret Donolan died 20th January 1816; Jane Reid died 20th November 1816 and Anne Talbot died 22nd January 1816.

(House of Commons Papers)

Sixty female prisoners who came by the Alexander were conveyed to Hobart Town on the brig Kangaroo, under Captain Jeffreys. The rest remained in Sydney.   The Principal Superintendent of Convicts William Hutchinson announced on 6th April that 'a quantity of female prisoners' had arrived on the Alexander and those colonists desirous of a housekeeper should apply to his Office.  

The Alexander was one of two convict ships bringing female prisoners in 1816, the other being the Mary Ann.  

John W. Hallion was employed as Surgeon Superintendent. He was also employed as surgeon on the convict ship Isabella in 1818.     

The Alexander departed Port Jackson bound for England on 23 June 1816.  

 
Notes and Links:
  
1).  Hunter Valley convicts and passengers of the Alexander

2). Dougald McFarlane - arrived free on the Alexander. Later mentioned in the Colonial Secretary's correspondence as being a prisoner at Newcastle - sent in 1819 and employed there for five years.

3). Some of the women who remained in New South Wales and were later mentioned in the Colonial Secretary's Correspondence include:

Anne Birking. Arrived as Anne Ellis, wife of Richard Birking. Tried in Tipperary. Requesting permission to marry in 1819

Catherine Clarke - Tried in Cork City in 181Resident at Evan in 1824. Married Michael Burke c. 1820 at Parramatta

Isabella Davies - Servant to Mr. Chalker. Requesting permission to marry at Parramatta in 1818

Agnes Foley - Tried in Dublin City in 1814. In 1823 requested permission to proceed to Port Dalrymple to join the service of Lieut. Thomson

Mary Foy (Stott) - Tried in Dublin City in 1814. On the list of prisoners sent to Newcastle in 1819 and 1821

Catherine Goff - Tried in Drogheda in 1815. On the list of prisoners sent to Newcastle in 1817. Requesting permission to marry in 1818

Catherine Hall - On list of prisoners transported to Newcastle in 1821

Bridget Lamb - Tried in Dublin City in 1815. Sent to the Derwent and transported to Newcastle in 1818

Mary Martin - Tried in Dublin City in January1815. Country servant aged 22. Correspondence re loss of certificate of freedom in 1824

Margaret Perry - Tried in Meath in 1815. On list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle in May 1816. Requesting to marry at Parramatta in 1820

Margaret Poole - On list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle in Nov. 1817

Margaret Rochfort - Tried in Cork City in 1815. Affidavit re loss of certificate of freedom in 1824

Mary Smith - Tried in Dublin City in 1815. Correspondence re permission to marry John Ferguson at Windsor in 1816 and re permission to marry Owen Divine at Sydney in 1817.

Martha Wales - Tried in Co. Down in 1815. Employed in the Female Factory in August 1817. Re permission to marry at Parramatta in 1817 and 1820

Ann Ward - Tried in Dublin City in 1815. Instructions that she be re-landed from the Kangaroo and not sent to VDL in April 1816. Requesting permission to marry at Liverpool in 1819.  

4). The Alexander  was one of nine convicts ships arriving in New South Wales in 1816 the others being the
Fanny, Mary Anne, Ocean, Guildford, Atlas, Elizabeth, Mariner and Surry. Approximately 1,415 prisoners arrived in NSW in 1816.